Plate Tectonics

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Plate Tectonics

  1. 1. Plate Tectonics <br />Ilkerender, “Kathmandu, Nepal, Himalayas, Everest”, May 5, 2008 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-Non Comercisl-NonDerivs<br />
  2. 2. What are Plate Tectonics? <br />Theory proposed in 1960’s and 70’s<br />Multiple individual plates<br />Located in the lithosphere<br />Move at different speeds<br />Move in different directions<br />
  3. 3. Major plates<br />African Plate<br />Antarctic Plate<br />Indo-Australian Plate<br />Eurasian Plate<br />North American Plate<br />South American Plate<br />Pacific Plate<br />
  4. 4. Dr.JohnBullas, “PlateTecto_web”, November 2, 2007 via Flickr, Creative Commons Atribution-Non Commercial-NoDerivs<br />
  5. 5. What is a Plate Boundary? <br />Two plates meeting head to head<br />Three different types of plate boundaries<br />Different geographic features associated with each<br />
  6. 6. Convergent Boundaries <br />TomDoyle, “Table Top Mt.Unalaka Island”, June 13, 2007 via Flickr, Creative Commons Atribution-Non Commercial-NoDerivs<br />
  7. 7. Convergent Boundaries<br />Plates collide<br />3 different situations<br />Oceanic – Continental<br />Oceanic – Oceanic<br />Continental - <br /> Continental<br />Ryan VandenAkker, “convergent boundary” October 3, 2010 via Paint<br />
  8. 8. Geographic Features<br />Mountains<br />Volcanoes<br />Earthquakes<br />Island Arcs<br /> Mono, “SieraVelluda- 3585 mts’’, October 7, 2006 via Flickr, Creative Commons Atribution-Non Commercial-NoDerivs<br />
  9. 9. Examples<br />Himalayas; Asia<br />Aleutian Islands; Northern Pacific Ocean<br />Andes; South America<br />Mariana Trench; Western Pacific Ocean<br />Pontic Mountains; Northern Turkey<br />
  10. 10. Transform Boundaries<br />Karabrugman, “the san andreas fault” March 23, 2010 via Flickr, Creative commons Attribution-NonComercial- NoDerivs<br />
  11. 11. Transform Boundaries<br />Plates “slide” past one another in opposite directions<br />Transform fault- the fracture zone between plates<br />Ryan VandenAkker, “transform boundary” October 3, 2010 via Paint<br />
  12. 12. Geographic Features<br />Transform Faults<br />Reoccurring earthquakes<br />Usually lack volcanoes<br /> Frank Officeier, “San Andreas Fault 2” May 23, 2007, Creative commons Attribution- NonComercial- NoDerivs<br />
  13. 13. Examples<br />San Andreas Fault Zone; North America<br />Alpine Fault; New Zealand<br />Dead Sea Transform Fault; Middle East<br />Chaman Fault; Pakistan<br />North Anatolian Fault; Turkey<br />Queen Charlotte Fault; North America<br />
  14. 14. Divergent Boundaries<br />Debcha, “Southwest Rift”, June 30 2007, Creative commons Attribution-NonComercial- NoDerivs<br />
  15. 15. Divergent Boundaries<br />Plates move away from one another. <br />Space in-between fills with magma and hardens. <br />Ryan VandenAkker, “divergent boundary” October 3, 2010 via Paint<br />
  16. 16. Geographic Features<br />Mid-ocean ridges<br />Continental Rifts<br /><ul><li>Rift Valleys</li></ul>Volcanic Islands<br /><ul><li>Hot Spots</li></ul>Dale Ghent, “La Cumbre lava flow”, April 23 2009 via Flickr, Creative commons Attribution- NonComercial- NoDerivs<br />
  17. 17. Examples <br />Mid-Atlantic Ridge; Atlantic Ocean<br />Great Rift Valley; East Africa<br /><ul><li>Red Sea Lift
  18. 18. East African Rift</li></ul>East Pacific Rise; Pacific Ocean<br />Explorer Ridge; West of Canada<br />Baikal Rift Zone; Southeast Russia<br />GakkelRidge; Arctic Ocean<br />Pacific-Antarctic Ridge; Southern Pacific Ocean<br />West Antarctic Rift; Antarctica<br />Galapagos Rise<br />

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