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‘CIMPLY’ DIFF “CULT” 2 CURE
LANG’AGE HABITS: IMPACT
OF E-TXTIN
 LOL
 BTW
 BRB
 Morow / 2mrw
 TTYL
 TGIF
 ROFL
 People fiddling with mobile phones
everywhere,
 Sending SMS -quickest, easiest and most
reasonable way to communicate,
...
 Almost half the urban children in India
now have access to mobile telephones.
 69 Million children under the age of 18
...
 Primary motive -relationship building,
sustenance, enrichment and social interaction.
 Used as a source of information ...
 Many researchers have studied the language of
the text messages.
 Three alternatives possible-
Positive, Negative & Non...
 Descriptive, Analytical and Empirical in
nature,
 Comparative Literature- Language and
Linguistics, Praxis and Gnosis,
...
 Text messaging is the practice whereby users of
mobile and portable devices exchange brief
written messages via cellular...
 E-texting- common lexical
& stylistic characteristics,
 Use of abbreviations,
 Letter Number
Homophones-Gr8,
 Non sta...
 Lexical shortenings (e.g. Sun for
‘Sunday’),
 Use of Capitalization,
 Use of punctuation marks,
 Blank spaces are oft...
 One-sentence text
messages,
 The omission of auxiliary
verbs,
 Omission of personal
pronouns and function
words,
 The...
 Code Switching,
 Use of English with other
regional language/s- For
example: “Arre, na, not
now” and “Movie mast
songs ...
 Characterized by brevity,
 Sentences are short &
choppy,
 From a single word to a
single sentence, and at
times, few s...
 Use of consonant
clusters (as in THX) is
peculiar,
 use of z as in girlz, the
k in skool,
 as phonological
approximati...
 Style is the image of
man.
 Local stylistic norms,
colour & culture creeps
into the text messages,
 capitalization (SE...
 Mukta Nain- “…It is essential that students are
persuaded not to use such language even while
interacting informally.”
...
 A Harried Mother: “It is hard to decipher the
words my son uses. He & his friends have
almost a language of their own, a...
 Impact-Positive –Crystal
 Negative-Siraj and Ullah, Rosen et al
 Negative Impact
 negative influence on standard writ...
 Educators,
academicians, linguists,
thinkers and parents—
 Texting is harming
students’ writing skills
and grammar,
 S...
 Affects their English usage in class work,
assignment work and examinations, formal &
informal situations,
 It takes it...
 Positive Effect-??? Hence Rejected
 Negative Effect-Hypothesis validated
and true
 None- It is not a separate language...
 Crystal, D. (2008). Txtng: The Gr8 Db8. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
 Hård af Segerstad, Ylva, Language Use in Swed...
 Crispin Thurlow and Michele Poff, Handbook of the Pragmatics of CMC,
Text Messaging , Berlin & New York: Mouton de
 Gru...
 Texting and Instant Messaging,
 http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/teaching_learning/texting_and_instant_mess
aging
...
 Textese’ creeps into answer scripts,
http://gulfnews.com/news/world/india/textese-
creeps-into-answer-scripts-1.1140615
...
Impact of e texting
Impact of e texting
Impact of e texting
Impact of e texting
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Impact of e texting

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All & sundry use English for text messaging. They use ‘techniques’ & appear ‘message-savvy’ & adopt ‘cults’. Their primary motive is relationship building, sustenance, enrichment and social interaction. Many researchers have studied the language of the text messages. They have opined that textese English can have a positive or negative or no effect whatsoever on the English of the students. This presentation is an attempt to show how textese English has had a negative impact/adverse effect on students in India.

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Impact of e texting

  1. 1. ‘CIMPLY’ DIFF “CULT” 2 CURE LANG’AGE HABITS: IMPACT OF E-TXTIN
  2. 2.  LOL  BTW  BRB  Morow / 2mrw  TTYL  TGIF  ROFL
  3. 3.  People fiddling with mobile phones everywhere,  Sending SMS -quickest, easiest and most reasonable way to communicate,  Essence-Brevity and economy,  English is the language of texting,  All & sundry use English for text messaging,  Use ‘techniques’ & appear ‘message-savvy’ & adopt ‘cults’,
  4. 4.  Almost half the urban children in India now have access to mobile telephones.  69 Million children under the age of 18 reside in the country’s urban areas and a whooping 30 million have a mobile handset.  Children (8-18) spend more time on mobile rather than in watching TV.
  5. 5.  Primary motive -relationship building, sustenance, enrichment and social interaction.  Used as a source of information and reminders,  Used to interact with automated systems as well,
  6. 6.  Many researchers have studied the language of the text messages.  Three alternatives possible- Positive, Negative & None  Some Linguists are of the opinion that the more students write, the more they improve upon their writing skills. Therefore, its increased use rather enhances the literacy of users, especially the youth instead of harming it (Crystal, 2008).
  7. 7.  Descriptive, Analytical and Empirical in nature,  Comparative Literature- Language and Linguistics, Praxis and Gnosis,  Review of Literature-Surveys, Research Projects and Reports, Published Papers (Journals and Books )and Comments/ Views of Experts,
  8. 8.  Text messaging is the practice whereby users of mobile and portable devices exchange brief written messages via cellular networks.  While the act of sending a text message is termed “texting”, the sender is called a “texter.”  It is used in place of voice calls in circumstances where it may be impossible or inexpedient (Dansieh).  technically & practically restricted, the limit is almost always 160 characters per message,
  9. 9.  E-texting- common lexical & stylistic characteristics,  Use of abbreviations,  Letter Number Homophones-Gr8,  Non standard spelling-Luv,  Phonetic spellings,  Splitting of compounds,  Vowel/s omission,  Using conventional and unconventional abbreviations,  all caps or all lower case ,  exchanging longer words for shorter ones ,  Use of acronyms ,  Employing Emoticons,  Use of innovative spellings,  Practice of reduction techniques ,  Phonetic reductions,  Syllabograms or rebus writing (e.g. as with the English b4 for ‘before’),  Unambiguous abbreviations (e.g. u for ‘you’; r for ‘are’),  Vowel deletions ,
  10. 10.  Lexical shortenings (e.g. Sun for ‘Sunday’),  Use of Capitalization,  Use of punctuation marks,  Blank spaces are often omitted,  Apostrophes and sentence-final punctuation are omitted,
  11. 11.  One-sentence text messages,  The omission of auxiliary verbs,  Omission of personal pronouns and function words,  The subject pronoun is deleted (syntactical reduction),  Openings and closings are frequently dropped,  Nouns being used as verbs-messaged, googled, texted,  Sentences without verbs,  Parts of speech being made redundant,  Single word sentences,  Violations in concord- no subject verb- agreement,
  12. 12.  Code Switching,  Use of English with other regional language/s- For example: “Arre, na, not now” and “Movie mast songs bekar”,  Culture Related terms,  Appellations,  Honorifics,  Social Deixis,  Devnagari being written in Roman Script,  There is a hybrid of speech and writing styles in terms of format, grammar and style,  Hybridization of languages,  Use of slangs, etc
  13. 13.  Characterized by brevity,  Sentences are short & choppy,  From a single word to a single sentence, and at times, few sentences,  Multiple clauses are rare,  Distinct, unique, novel, unorthodox linguistic forms employed,  Missing letters, contractions (middle letters are missing), in G-clippings & others as in dropping the final letter,  In the use of acronyms, missing end letters, letter/number homophones, ‘misspellings’ & typographical variations, non-conventional spellings, & accent stylizations.
  14. 14.  Use of consonant clusters (as in THX) is peculiar,  use of z as in girlz, the k in skool,  as phonological approximations such as Americanized forms like gonna, bin, & coz,  g-clippings like jumpin, havin,  letter-number homophones- 2d8,  Minimum uses of caps,  Variations in punctuation,  onomatopoeic, exclamatory spellings (e.g. haha!, arrrgh!,  typographical-cum- linguistic devices for adding prosodic impact (e.g. fast, fast, run, run, ),  playful, chatty, and friendly tone ,  Humour & Chain Messaging,
  15. 15.  Style is the image of man.  Local stylistic norms, colour & culture creeps into the text messages,  capitalization (SEE, WAIT, COME, etc),  multiple punctuation (what???!!!),  Lexical items such as ello (‘hello’), goin (‘going’), and bin (‘been’) –phonological approximation,  Overuse of punctuation,  The loss of typographic contrastivity, italics, bold, underlined, etc is noteworthy.
  16. 16.  Mukta Nain- “…It is essential that students are persuaded not to use such language even while interacting informally.”  Bose- “It surely is creeping up as a problem.”  Nain- “We have been trying to tell them that using such abbreviated words is actually destroying language.”  Sunanado Sanyal (Academician): “…The onus is on teachers and parents. Schools must deal with the ‘textese’ problem strictly; otherwise the problem will get compounded with time.”
  17. 17.  A Harried Mother: “It is hard to decipher the words my son uses. He & his friends have almost a language of their own, and it is also reflected in his answer sheets.”  Bipul Bhadra (Sociologist): “It is best that children are kept away from cell phones until they first learn the basic grammar and begin to use English or some other language with felicity. It may sound impractical, but unless there is prohibition on SMSing and Internet chatting, the problem can not be cured.”
  18. 18.  Impact-Positive –Crystal  Negative-Siraj and Ullah, Rosen et al  Negative Impact  negative influence on standard writing, spelling & grammar,  Neography has emerged as an alternative orthography ,
  19. 19.  Educators, academicians, linguists, thinkers and parents—  Texting is harming students’ writing skills and grammar,  Spellings of the students- atrocious,  Use of abbreviations- negative effect,  Lack of proper punctuation, shoddy grammar-adverse effect on reading and writing habits,  A definite language change and stylistic diffusion is noticed in their writing.  Affects their vocabulary,
  20. 20.  Affects their English usage in class work, assignment work and examinations, formal & informal situations,  It takes its toll on their lexis and structure and results in non-conformity with grammatical rules  Language usage is habit based.  Youth lingo and cult,  Huge no. of messages-deep rooted habits,  AT THE COST OF STANDARD LANGUAGE
  21. 21.  Positive Effect-??? Hence Rejected  Negative Effect-Hypothesis validated and true  None- It is not a separate language/lingo. It has adverse impact and hence rejected.  SMS Lingo enhances the literacy of users-proved wrong and hence rejected.
  22. 22.  Crystal, D. (2008). Txtng: The Gr8 Db8. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Hård af Segerstad, Ylva, Language Use in Swedish Mobile Text Messaging. In Mobile Communications:  Re-negotiation of the social sphere, Rich Ling and Per E. Pedersen (eds.), Ed. 2005, 313 - 334. London:  Springer.18  Shortis, Tim, Gr8 txtpectations: The creativity of text spelling. English Drama Media, 2007a,  Shortis, Tim, Postmodernism and its insinuations on media and society. Journal of  Development Communication 18 (1-10): 2007 b,  Siraj, Syed Abdul and Farish Ullah , Postmodernism and its insinuations on media and society. Journal of Development  Communication 18 (2): 1-10. 2007,
  23. 23.  Crispin Thurlow and Michele Poff, Handbook of the Pragmatics of CMC, Text Messaging , Berlin & New York: Mouton de  Gruyter, 2011, http://faculty.washington.edu/thurlow/papers/thurlow&poff(2010).pdf  Solomon Ali Dansieh, International Journal of English Linguistics, SMS Texting and Its Potential Impacts on Students'  Written Communication Skills, Vol. 1, No. 2; September 2011, www.ccsenet.org/ijel,  Internet linguistics, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_linguistics#cite_note-  No_LOL_Matter:_Cyber_lingo_shows_up_in_academia-10  Text messaging, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_messaging#Effect_on_language  John Myhra, Negative Effects Of Texting In The Classroom, http://56wrtg1150.wikidot.com/negative-effects-of-texting-inthe-  classroom
  24. 24.  Texting and Instant Messaging,  http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/teaching_learning/texting_and_instant_mess aging  http://www.FitTheModel.com.  http://www.FitTheModel.com  Text Messaging and its Effects on Teens' Grammar,  http://www.bamaed.ua.edu/edtechcases/Case%20Numbers/text%20messaging%20 and%20grammar_Case%20  11.pdf  Russell, L. (2010). The effects text messaging on English grammar. [Online] Available:  http://www.ehow.com/list_5828172_effects-text-messaging-english-rammar.html (April 20, 2010).  The Journal for ESL Teachers and Learners.VOL. I, 2012,59,  Text Messaging Abbreviations & Shortcuts, http://www.illumasolutions.com/omg- plz-lol-idk-idc-btw-brb-jk.htm  http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://savedelete.com/wp-content/  http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://therebelreport.org/wp-content/, Textese’ creeps into answer scripts, http://gulfnews.com/news/world/india/textese-creeps-into-answer-scripts-1.1140615 Txt lingo creeps in2 ans scrpts, teachers worried, http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-in-school/txt-lingo-creeps-in2-ans-scrpts-teachers-worried/article4
  25. 25.  Textese’ creeps into answer scripts, http://gulfnews.com/news/world/india/textese- creeps-into-answer-scripts-1.1140615  Txt lingo creeps in2 ans scrpts, teachers worried, http://www.thehindu.com/todays- paper/tp-in-school/txt-lingo-creeps-in2-ans- scrpts-teachers-worried/article4384006.ece

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