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2019 CALL Research Conference: Thinking small about social media assisted language learning

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This is the presentation version of this slide show. When I tried to upload a revised version I discovered that Slideshare no longer allows for replacement of slides once uploaded, and I can't change the TinyURL that points to this link. However, please find the updated version of these slides at https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1iqCH3O-b5XELHiUx77qhmC6_7DlBASB8_KET2Flrp1U/edit?usp=sharing

The video of Vance giving this presentation is here: https://youtu.be/bwG-4nNKSkE

Also, there are show notes for this presentation, Learning2gether.net episode 415, at https://learning2gether.net/2019/07/10/thinking-small-about-social-media-assisted-language-learning-vance-stevens-presenting-at-the-2019-call-research-conference-hong-kong/

This presentation makes a case for SMALL as a more appropriate acronym than CALL to reflect the reduced significance of the microprocessor in language learning and emphasize instead the most salient affordances computers bring to the process. Early CALL theorists note that the term might not transition to an era of network based learning. Since social media is an enabler of the meaningful and authentic communication so critically necessary to effective language learning, the presentation encourages language practitioners to "think SMALL" and model for one another the use of social media and Web 2.0 in language learning. The accompanying paper shows how engagement in communities of practice spills over into changes in teaching practices and reports results of a survey of teacher perceptions of how effectively students and teachers are able to transition use of social media in their personal lives to their professional ones, for the purposes of both teaching and learning.

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2019 CALL Research Conference: Thinking small about social media assisted language learning

  1. 1. Thinking SMALL about social media assisted language learning Why not call CALL “SMALL”? Vance Stevens Presented at the CALL Research Conference in Hong Kong July 10, 2019 The slides for this presentation are here http://tinyurl.com/call2019vance
  2. 2. A question of emphasis About my subtitle, is it … ? • Why not call CALL “SMALL”? • Maybe we should? • Or … Why NOT call CALL “SMALL”? • Maybe we shouldn’t? I neither advocate nor suggest • Any changes in acronym or disruption to the established order where the term CALL has served us so well • That any follow-on to this CALL Research Conference on the theme of social CALL should be the SMALL Research Conference … That would be ridiculous The portal for this presentation is here http://tinyurl.com/call2019vance
  3. 3. This talk is in 3 parts 1. Background regarding the case for SMALL 2. Why teachers must model productive social media techniques with one another 3. Survey of extent to which teachers are preparing students to engage in collaborative work models
  4. 4. The back story: Normalization of Computers With normalization, the C in CALL is decreasingly descriptive (Bax, 2003 and 2011) •Would a better acronym more accurately characterize the role of computers in language learning? •Levy and Hubbard reposted in 2005 with Why call CALL “CALL”? in language learning and in our lives in general
  5. 5. Why call CALL “CALL”? Because • it reliably describes what we do • the term had been in use for two decades at the time the article was written But there’s a longevity clause: “perhaps … the label CALL cannot ultimately make the transition from pre-network to network-based teaching and learning,” (pp. 143-144)
  6. 6. When was CALL not called “CALL”? … when it was CAI John Higgins’s picture is from https://eurocall.webs.upv.es/textos/history_of_call.pdf Let there be CALL John Higgins, 1983
  7. 7. I argued against Higgins in 1983 (I’m glad I lost :-) Why? Because … • CAI was predominant in the literature at the time • CAI described what we were doing • The term had been in use for decades past Now there are many contenders to replace CALL “perhaps … the label CALL cannot ultimately make the transition from pre-network to network-based teaching and learning,” (pp. 143-144)
  8. 8. So, why not call CALL “SMALL”? Now that • we find ourselves in just such an age of network-based teaching and learning • and gathered together here at a CALL Research Conference on Social CALL It is worthwhile to consider how we have re-positioned ourselves • whether or not some chose to call it SMALL • albeit subsumed under the umbrella term, CALL.
  9. 9. SMALL at TESOL 2019 Atlanta https://learning2gether.net/2019/03/13/call-is-academic-session-on-small-research-practice- impact-of-social-media-assisted-language-learning-webcast-from-tesol-2019-atlanta/
  10. 10. SMALL 2009 to present Stevens (2014) and notes on SMALL http://tinyurl.com/small2014 - All references are here https://advanceducation.blogspot.com/2019/07/why-not-call-call-small.html TESOL Denver, 2009 2010 http://ow.ly/1C9dG TESOL Dallas, 2013
  11. 11. SMALL in Google Scholar A Google Scholar search on the string "social media assisted language learning" turns up • no hits when filtered through 2009 • filtered through 2010 it produces one hit for Stevens (2010) • Filtered through 2011 there is an additional hit on Mashinter, (2011), who cites Stevens, Cozens, and Buckingham (2010) as her source for the term Even a search through the current year 2019 produces only 10 references
  12. 12. Part 2: Why teachers must model productive social media techniques with one another to increase their knowledge and awareness of the affordances of social media in their own communities of practice There is no time to cover this in greater detail today, but see slide 15 in this presentation https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1ls3ZeIEk9vssYXBxoVbzn0_K99Wz9vc xWJU_v3wmgSA/edit?usp=sharing Here, find more background on the importance of social media in communities of practice of educators learning how to use social media in their own learning in collaboration with one another In order to be in a position to use social media with their students Here, I will add one more such story …
  13. 13. How modeling SMALL with peers precedes teachers using it with students: An example
  14. 14. Part 3: Survey of extent teachers are preparing students to engage in collaborative work models To address this question, I created a survey • to establish a benchmark of educator perceptions of their competence and effectiveness in using social media in language learning • vis à vis that of their students If we don’t have time to cover all these selected results, find a fuller report in the conference proceedings, and a draft of my submission to those proceedings here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1AVhvkr8moLB_BgLbvhO2UY2v4-VQVOlNfyjU6l58-IU/edit?usp=sharing
  15. 15. Interplay between student and teacher use of SMALL Of 60 respondents to a poll sent out to educators through my own social media networks (all reported their occupations as relating to education) • Most tended to use social media with their students and in their own learning, though many did not use social media for either • 74% said they used social media in learning from their peers; 19% said they didn’t • Two thirds said they used social media with their students; almost a quarter said they didn’t • To the question “Social media holds compelling potential for language learning.” 85% agreed, 13% neutral, and one respondent said it could be, but was not worth the privacy risk
  16. 16. How does social media work out in class? • To the statement, “Social media generally distracts from learning in the classroom” • 22% agreed, 25% were neutral • 47% disagreed (8% strongly), with other answers pointing out that it depends on how social media is used in class • Almost 60% reported mostly positive experiences using social media with their students in their teaching, • whereas 20% said they had never used social media with students • 82% reported mostly positive experiences using social media in personal learning
  17. 17. Educators’ perceptions of colleagues’ use of social media The survey asked if teachers in general might use social media themselves but not know how to use it effectively in their teaching. • Surprisingly, 85% agreed (20% agreed strongly) Only 8% disagreed, and 5% (3 respondents) were neutral. So educators responding to this survey felt that many of their colleagues were familiar with social media for their own purposes, but were not up to speed on its use with students
  18. 18. To the statement “students might use social media themselves but not know how to use it effectively in their learning” • Strong agreement with this (78%) • 12% were neutral • and 8.3% disagreed (but none strongly) Educators’ perceptions of their students’ use of social media
  19. 19. Some reasons educators do NOT use social media with their students? • Privacy laws prevent this; College does not allow • I'd like students to talk with each other face-to-face • Not sufficiently strong pedagogical purpose for which to use it • Does not seem relevant • I have enough trouble getting them into the main system where they can access the things I need to do • No need, we have other ICT like Moodle, Google+, emails • Moodle provides enough opportunities for interaction • I use social media for personal, social reasons and for professional development • Students tend to use it for social, personal reasons and teachers engaging them there may intrude into their personal space • It can also blur personal/professional boundaries and appear inappropriate
  20. 20. Are we out of time? In Conclusion I don't anticipate seeing the formation of a social media assisted language instruction consortium in my lifetime. • However, as the presentations at the 2019 CALL Research Conference on Social CALL should suggest, this appears to be a robust and viable interest in CALL in this new age of 'network-based teaching and learning’ • Certainly a prime and current focus in our using computers in language learning should be on what computers do best for language learners, which is to facilitate communication among them and with native speakers of a language, largely through social media The portal for this presentation is here http://tinyurl.com/call2019vance
  21. 21. More information: I have written out my remarks at this blog post https://advanceducation.blogspot.com/2019/07/why-not-call-call-small.html • A “long” version of the chapter I submitted to the conference proceedings containing my findings is shared publicly here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1AVhvkr8moLB_BgLbvhO2UY2v4- VQVOlNfyjU6l58-IU/edit?usp=sharing • You can find these slide with all links working at https://www.slideshare.net/vances/ • The recording of my presentation in Zoom will be posted at my blog • There is a TINYURL pointing to these slides, where all these links are, here: http://tinyurl.com/call2019vance More notes on SMALL http://tinyurl.com/small2014 - All references are here https://advanceducation.blogspot.com/2019/07/why-not-call-call-small.html

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