20496266 brand-elements-name-logo-and-jingle

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  • Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomatopœia ) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or "pop," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the greek words "onoma" (name) and "poio" (verb meaning "to create") thus it essentially means "name creation". onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:Asked about the name "Kodak", George Eastman replied, "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child's first 'goo'—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!" David Houston, inventor of many patents bought by George Eastman, lived in North Dakota and may have suggested the word "Nodak" to Eastman
  • Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomatopœia ) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or "pop," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the greek words "onoma" (name) and "poio" (verb meaning "to create") thus it essentially means "name creation". onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:Asked about the name "Kodak", George Eastman replied, "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child's first 'goo'—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!" David Houston, inventor of many patents bought by George Eastman, lived in North Dakota and may have suggested the word "Nodak" to Eastman
  • Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomatopœia ) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or "pop," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the greek words "onoma" (name) and "poio" (verb meaning "to create") thus it essentially means "name creation". onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:Asked about the name "Kodak", George Eastman replied, "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child's first 'goo'—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!" David Houston, inventor of many patents bought by George Eastman, lived in North Dakota and may have suggested the word "Nodak" to Eastman
  • Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomatopœia ) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or "pop," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the greek words "onoma" (name) and "poio" (verb meaning "to create") thus it essentially means "name creation". onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:Asked about the name "Kodak", George Eastman replied, "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child's first 'goo'—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!" David Houston, inventor of many patents bought by George Eastman, lived in North Dakota and may have suggested the word "Nodak" to Eastman
  • Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomatopœia ) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or "pop," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the greek words "onoma" (name) and "poio" (verb meaning "to create") thus it essentially means "name creation". onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:Asked about the name "Kodak", George Eastman replied, "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child's first 'goo'—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!" David Houston, inventor of many patents bought by George Eastman, lived in North Dakota and may have suggested the word "Nodak" to Eastman
  • Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomatopœia ) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or "pop," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the greek words "onoma" (name) and "poio" (verb meaning "to create") thus it essentially means "name creation". onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:Asked about the name "Kodak", George Eastman replied, "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child's first 'goo'—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!" David Houston, inventor of many patents bought by George Eastman, lived in North Dakota and may have suggested the word "Nodak" to Eastman
  • Summary Overview There are several characteristics of a good brand name. Some successful brand names are exceptions to all or many of these guidelines, but many of them originated when they faced little competition. Key Issues Among the characteristics of a good brand name are the following: Short and simple. Easy to spell and read. Easy to recognize and remember. Easy to pronounce. Can be pronounced in only one way. Can be pronounced in all languages required. Suggests product benefits. Meets packaging/labeling needs. No undesirable imagery. Always timely (does not become outdated). Adapts to any advertising medium. Legally available for use. Discussion Question: Think of a popular brand name. How does it measure up on these characteristics of a good brand name? A respected name builds brand equity --the value of the brand’s overall strength in the market. This slide relates to material on pp. 260-261.  Indicates place where slide “builds” to include the corresponding point. 
  • Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomatopœia ) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or "pop," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the greek words "onoma" (name) and "poio" (verb meaning "to create") thus it essentially means "name creation". onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:Asked about the name "Kodak", George Eastman replied, "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child's first 'goo'—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!" David Houston, inventor of many patents bought by George Eastman, lived in North Dakota and may have suggested the word "Nodak" to Eastman
  • Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomatopœia ) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or "pop," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the greek words "onoma" (name) and "poio" (verb meaning "to create") thus it essentially means "name creation". onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:Asked about the name "Kodak", George Eastman replied, "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child's first 'goo'—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!" David Houston, inventor of many patents bought by George Eastman, lived in North Dakota and may have suggested the word "Nodak" to Eastman
  • Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomatopœia ) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or "pop," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the greek words "onoma" (name) and "poio" (verb meaning "to create") thus it essentially means "name creation". onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:Asked about the name "Kodak", George Eastman replied, "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child's first 'goo'—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!" David Houston, inventor of many patents bought by George Eastman, lived in North Dakota and may have suggested the word "Nodak" to Eastman
  • Cultural blunders are funny to us, but not to businesses who spend big bucks marketing their products worldwide. How can you learn from their red faces? Read on. Did you know that in Germany latte means erection? If you are Starbucks you better know. And if you are Rolls Royce you better know that mist means manure in German, especially since one of your cars is named the Silver Mist. What if your specialty is baby food? Stay away from France if your name is Gerber: it’s a French word for vomiting. Although some of these translations might seem funny to us, they can be a nightmare to companies reaching out to a global audience. After all, the last thing you want to do as a business is be the laughing stock of your potential customers. Even worse? Offend them and have them shun you. This is precisely what happened to U.S. retail giant Nike. Muslim customers in the Middle East boycotted Nike after it launched a shoe in the mid-nineties with a symbol that was supposed to suggest a flame. To Muslims, the design suggested Arabic script for Allah. Placing Allah close to the sole of the foot, a part of the body considered unclean in that culture, was a form of blasphemy. As a result Muslims boycotted Nike until they made amends. If these cultural blunders can happen to super-sized corporations like Nike, what about the little guys? Needless to say, one has only to go as far as their mouse to discover that Lost in Translation is not just a great movie starring Bill Murray. Multilingual websites are rampant with mistakes and cultural gaffes. And many companies don’t even know just how lost in translation they are. The nuances of translation are far-ranging. A literal word in one language, for example, may have no equivalent in another language, or could have a completely different "meaning" or effect in the translated language. A great translation is one that finds true equivalence – linguistically, conceptually and culturally.
  • Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomatopœia ) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "buzz," or "pop," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the greek words "onoma" (name) and "poio" (verb meaning "to create") thus it essentially means "name creation". onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:Asked about the name "Kodak", George Eastman replied, "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child's first 'goo'—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!" David Houston, inventor of many patents bought by George Eastman, lived in North Dakota and may have suggested the word "Nodak" to Eastman
  • 20496266 brand-elements-name-logo-and-jingle

    1. 1. Cultivating Brand EquityStep 1: Selecting Brand elements Symbols CriteriaStep 2: Creating Associations Integrated marketing communications Effective advertising communication Effective promotion, pricing, placement
    2. 2. Brand Elements Summarize associations Aid retrieval of brand information Simplify new learning 2
    3. 3. Brand Elements Brand URLs namesSlogans Elements Logos Characters Symbols
    4. 4. Brand Elements Choice Criteria:General ConsiderationsMemorable Adaptable Easily Recognized Flexible & Easily Recalled UpdateableMeaningful Protectable Credible & Suggestive Legally Rich Visual & Verbal Competitively Imagery TransferrableAppealing Within & Across Product Fun & Interesting Categories Aesthetics Across Geographical Boundaries & Cultures
    5. 5. Brands. What’s in a Name ?
    6. 6. Brand Name “Is there a particular type of name that will guarantee brand success ?
    7. 7. Some strong Brands Coca Cola IBM Schweppes Marlboro Kodak Mercedes Lexus Provided there is a consistent effort over time to give meaning to this name
    8. 8. Brand name must be chosen with a view to the brands future and destiny, not in relation to specific market and product situation at the time of its birth
    9. 9. Descriptive NamesMost of the time managers want the brand name to describe what the product does The denotative names Brands don’t describe the products Brands distinguish the products
    10. 10. The Brand NameThe name must serve to add extra meaning to convey the spirit of the brand It must convey brands durable uniqueness and not just the characteristic of the temporary
    11. 11. The Brand Name The Brand is not a product.Brand name therefore should not describe what the product does but reveal a difference.
    12. 12. The Brand NameThis uniqueness has to do much more withthe other facets of brand identity than with the physique Its culture, its personality, its relationships etc
    13. 13. Thinking about a new brand Short & Simple Easy to Spell & ReadEasy to Recognize & Remember Easy to Pronounce Can Pronounce in Only One Way Can Pronounce in All Languages Suggests Product Benefits Meets Packaging/Labeling Needs No Undesirable Imagery Always Timely Adapts to Any Advertising Medium Legally Available for Use
    14. 14. Brand Name• Short and simple• Easy to spell and read• Easy to recognize and remember• Easy to pronounce• Can be pronounced in only one way• Can be pronounced in all languages (for international markets)• Suggestive of product benefits• Adaptable to packaging / labeling needs• No undesirable imagery• Always timely (does not get out-of-date)• Adaptable to any advertising medium• Legally available for use (not in use by another firm)
    15. 15. Brand Name Types Actual words Energizer Coined (Descriptive) Microsoft Coined (Abstract) Maytag Acronym Names GE
    16. 16. Logos and Symbols Word Marks: Abstract Logos: Literal Logos:
    17. 17. The Brand Name A brand name that simply describes theproduct and products function will not beable to differentiate the brand from copies or generic products descriptive brand name boils down to making a brand a generic product in the long run
    18. 18. Consider Copy Phenomena Like Vibramycine or TerramycineRanitidine is zantac whereas cimetidine is Tagamet
    19. 19. Think internationally Suze is a bitter French vine just almost means sweet in German.Nike cannot be registered in many Arab countries 1300 common words in 7 European languages
    20. 20. ThinkChoose abstract names which, having no previous meaning can thus create their own.
    21. 21. Punch Lines  More car per car……….TATA Indica V2  Spoil yourself…………..TATA Indigo  Lets make things better……Philips  For a special journey called life…..Chevrolet  The difference is German engineering….Corsa  Express yourself……Airtel  For Managing Tomorrow…..Business Today
    22. 22. Coke gets it wrongThe name Coca-Cola in China was first rendered as Ke-kou-ke-la. Unfortunately, the Coke company did not discover until after thousands of signs had been printed that the phrase means “bite the wax tadpole” or “female horse stuffed with wax” depending on the dialect.
    23. 23. Coke gets it right?Coke then researched 40,000 Chinese characters and found a close phonetic equivalent “ko-kou- ko-le”, which can be loosely translated as “happiness in the mouth”.(competition in 1930s)
    24. 24. Pepsi and KFCIn Taiwan, the translation of the Pepsi slogan “Come alive with the Pepsi Generation” came out as “Pepsi will bring your ancestors back from the dead.”Also in Chinese, the Kentucky Fried Chicken slogan “finger-lickin’ good” came out as “eat your fingers off.”
    25. 25. Divided by a common languageIn an effort to boost orange juice sales in predominantly continental breakfast eating England, a campaign was devised to extol the drink’s eye-opening, pick-me-up qualities. Hence the slogan, “Orange juice. It gets your pecker up”.
    26. 26. Sanitary & Phytosanitary (SPS)regulationssanitary (human and animal health) measures and phytosanitary (plant health)Often used as non-tariff barrier (NTB) eg fireblight – big dispute with AustraliaEssential to preserve good reputation of exports Eg Listeria in NZ cheese to Holland

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