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Workshop #13: Scenario Based Design_handoutsB

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In this workshop, you’ll learn to create scenarios and other types of stories to identify product opportunities, form design hypotheses and focus the design and evaluation of new user experiences. Drawing on your existing ability to tell a story, we’ll cover character development, motivation, internal dialog and story arc – all in the context of creating great user experiences.

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Workshop #13: Scenario Based Design_handoutsB

  1. 1. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris Shane Morris @shanemo shane@automaticstudio.com.au SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX SINGAPORE 2016 WORKSHOP STORIES ELEMENTS OF A SCENARIO EXERCISE: CHARACTER SCENARIO CONTENTS EXERCISE: PLOT SCENARIO RULES EXERCISE: SCENARIO SCENARIO REVIEW EXERCISE: REVIEW NEXT STEPS WRAP-UP AGENDA USABILITY TESTING STORIES
  2. 2. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris STORIES "Evidence strongly suggests that humans in all cultures come to cast their own identity in some sort of narrative form. We are inveterate storytellers.“ Owen Flanagan, Consciousness Reconsidered wikipedia.org/wiki/Narrative ELEMENTS OF A STORY CHARACTER SETTING CONFLICT PLOT THEME ME, AND THE CHILDREN PROJECT OFFICE ME VS THE DEVELOPERS HOW I OVERCAME ADVERSITY USABILITY TESTING stories and user experience Stories describe people’s behaviour OVER TIME Which is exactly what we are in the business of doing… User Experience Designers design behaviour over time Future ways for people to behave. SCENARIOS SCENARIOS ARE “DAY IN THE LIFE OF…” STORIES THAT CAPTURE THE INTENDED EXPERIENCE OF PEOPLE USING A NEW PRODUCT OR SERVICE. Scenarios help project members and stakeholders focus on how the system will be used in the ‘real world’. Scenarios are often used to start imagining how behaviour will change with the introduction of a new product. For this reason, they describe the whole context and environment of use, not just the features and behaviour of the product. TO MAKE SCENARIOS MORE RELEVANT, THEY DESCRIBE A PARTICULAR SITUATION AND CONTEXT. For example, they might describe the way one particular person might solve a problem with the product. This does not imply that all people/situations will be the same. SCENARIOS DO NOT INCLUDE DETAILS OF WHAT THE PRODUCT ACTUALLY LOOKS LIKE. The ‘look and feel’ will be addressed later, once issues of workflow and user behaviour have been addressed. SO WHAT ARE THEY?
  3. 3. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris LET’S SEE ONE! Jason and Grace are a busy working couple living in the inner city. Jason works as a civil engineer and drives a lot to different construction sites for work. Grace works as a lawyer at a big city law firm and is completing an MBA. With less and less time for exercise, Jason and Grace have at least been trying to improve their eating habits. They thought about those home-delivered pre-cooked meals but, as Grace says: "They just seem so sterile!". On Wednesday night, Jason gets home from work around 7pm. He collects the mail on the way in and dumps it on the table. Grace isn't home yet. She messaged him to say she was on her way and asked him to organise dinner. There's no way Jason is going to cook at this hour, so it looks like take away again... That's when Jason notices the flier from a new pizza company called “Virtuous Circle” on the table. Apparently, they offer the convenience of fast food with the nutritional value of home cooked. Intrigued, Jason loads up Virtuous Circle's mobile app. Jason immediately gets to work ordering the pizzas. Interestingly, the app starts by asking how many people he is ordering for. Jason browses the pizza options. Grace is vegetarian, so he filters the list to make things easier. The Black Bean Salsa pizza looks good. He adds one medium to the order. When he does, he sees a running total of calories, carbohydrates, fat and salt for their order - represented as a percentage of the daily recommended intake for 2 people. Hmm, the salt level is a bit higher than the average - and Grace has been told to watch her blood pressure. Jason finds an alternative - Broccoli and Rocket. He adds that and removes the Black Bean Salsa from the order. Cool. He then finds a pizza for himself: Lamb Lahmahjoon. He checks the ingredients. Jason is allergic to onions, so he removes the shallots. He replaces them with baby spinach then adds the second pizza to their order. The nutritional information for the whole order checks out - so he proceeds to pay. When he does, he is alerted to Virtuous Circle's introductory offer of a small Summer Berries dessert pizza for $6. Before Jason adds it he can see how it will affect the scores for the meal. They're still in the green zone, so he goes ahead. Jason enters his payment details and watches while his credit card is validated. Sitting down in front of the TV, he can easily keep an eye on the progress of his order. He watches as their order moves from 'received' to 'preparing' to 'cooking' and finally to 'on its way'. The app alerts him when the order is 5 minutes away. Time to set the table! ELEMENTS OF A STORY CHARACTER SETTING CONFLICT OR CHALLENGE PLOT THEME CHARACTERS Jason and Grace are a busy working couple living in the inner city. Jason works as a civil engineer and drives a lot to different construction sites for work. Grace works as a lawyer at a big city law firm and is completing an MBA. With less and less time for exercise, Jason and Grace have at least been trying to improve their eating habits. They thought about those home-delivered pre-cooked meals but, as Grace says: "They just seem so sterile!". On Wednesday night, Jason gets home from work around 7pm. He collects the mail on the way in and dumps it on the table. Grace isn't home yet. She messaged him to say she was on her way and asked him to organise dinner. There's no way Jason is going to cook at this hour, so it looks like take away again... That's when Jason notices the flier from a new pizza company called “Virtuous Circle” on the table. Apparently, they offer the convenience of fast food with the nutritional value of home cooked. Intrigued, Jason loads up Virtuous Circle's mobile app. Jason immediately gets to work ordering the pizzas. Interestingly, the app starts by asking how many people he is ordering for. Jason browses the pizza options. Grace is vegetarian, so he filters the list to make things easier. The Black Bean Salsa pizza looks good. He adds one medium to the order. When he does, he sees a running total of calories, carbohydrates, fat and salt for their order - represented as a percentage of the daily recommended intake for 2 people. Hmm, the salt level is a bit higher than the average - and Grace has been told to watch her blood pressure. Jason finds an alternative - Broccoli and Rocket. He adds that and removes the Black Bean Salsa from the order. Cool. He then finds a pizza for himself: Lamb Lahmahjoon. He checks the ingredients. Jason is allergic to onions, so he removes the shallots. He replaces them with baby spinach then adds the second pizza to their order. The nutritional information for the whole order checks out - so he proceeds to pay. When he does, he is alerted to Virtuous Circle's introductory offer of a small Summer Berries dessert pizza for $6. Before Jason adds it he can see how it will affect the scores for the meal. They're still in the green zone, so he goes ahead. Jason enters his payment details and watches while his credit card is validated. Sitting down in front of the TV, he can easily keep an eye on the progress of his order. He watches as their order moves from 'received' to 'preparing' to 'cooking' and finally to 'on its way'. The app alerts him when the order is 5 minutes away. Time to set the table! LET’S SEE ONE SETTING Jason and Grace are a busy working couple living in the inner city. Jason works as a civil engineer and drives a lot to different construction sites for work. Grace works as a lawyer at a big city law firm and is completing an MBA. With less and less time for exercise, Jason and Grace have at least been trying to improve their eating habits. They thought about those home-delivered pre-cooked meals but, as Grace says: "They just seem so sterile!". On Wednesday night, Jason gets home from work around 7pm. He collects the mail on the way in and dumps it on the table. Grace isn't home yet. She messaged him to say she was on her way and asked him to organise dinner. There's no way Jason is going to cook at this hour, so it looks like take away again... That's when Jason notices the flier from a new pizza company called “Virtuous Circle” on the table. Apparently, they offer the convenience of fast food with the nutritional value of home cooked. Intrigued, Jason loads up Virtuous Circle's mobile app. Jason immediately gets to work ordering the pizzas. Interestingly, the app starts by asking how many people he is ordering for. Jason browses the pizza options. Grace is vegetarian, so he filters the list to make things easier. The Black Bean Salsa pizza looks good. He adds one medium to the order. When he does, he sees a running total of calories, carbohydrates, fat and salt for their order - represented as a percentage of the daily recommended intake for 2 people. Hmm, the salt level is a bit higher than the average - and Grace has been told to watch her blood pressure. Jason finds an alternative - Broccoli and Rocket. He adds that and removes the Black Bean Salsa from the order. Cool. He then finds a pizza for himself: Lamb Lahmahjoon. He checks the ingredients. Jason is allergic to onions, so he removes the shallots. He replaces them with baby spinach then adds the second pizza to their order. The nutritional information for the whole order checks out - so he proceeds to pay. When he does, he is alerted to Virtuous Circle's introductory offer of a small Summer Berries dessert pizza for $6. Before Jason adds it he can see how it will affect the scores for the meal. They're still in the green zone, so he goes ahead. Jason enters his payment details and watches while his credit card is validated. Sitting down in front of the TV, he can easily keep an eye on the progress of his order. He watches as their order moves from 'received' to 'preparing' to 'cooking' and finally to 'on its way'. The app alerts him when the order is 5 minutes away. Time to set the table! LET’S SEE ONE
  4. 4. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris CONFLICT OR CHALLENGE Jason and Grace are a busy working couple living in the inner city. Jason works as a civil engineer and drives a lot to different construction sites for work. Grace works as a lawyer at a big city law firm and is completing an MBA. With less and less time for exercise, Jason and Grace have at least been trying to improve their eating habits. They thought about those home-delivered pre-cooked meals but, as Grace says: "They just seem so sterile!". On Wednesday night, Jason gets home from work around 7pm. He collects the mail on the way in and dumps it on the table. Grace isn't home yet. She messaged him to say she was on her way and asked him to organise dinner. There's no way Jason is going to cook at this hour, so it looks like take away again... That's when Jason notices the flier from a new pizza company called “Virtuous Circle” on the table. Apparently, they offer the convenience of fast food with the nutritional value of home cooked. Intrigued, Jason loads up Virtuous Circle's mobile app. Jason immediately gets to work ordering the pizzas. Interestingly, the app starts by asking how many people he is ordering for. Jason browses the pizza options. Grace is vegetarian, so he filters the list to make things easier. The Black Bean Salsa pizza looks good. He adds one medium to the order. When he does, he sees a running total of calories, carbohydrates, fat and salt for their order - represented as a percentage of the daily recommended intake for 2 people. Hmm, the salt level is a bit higher than the average - and Grace has been told to watch her blood pressure. Jason finds an alternative - Broccoli and Rocket. He adds that and removes the Black Bean Salsa from the order. Cool. He then finds a pizza for himself: Lamb Lahmahjoon. He checks the ingredients. Jason is allergic to onions, so he removes the shallots. He replaces them with baby spinach then adds the second pizza to their order. The nutritional information for the whole order checks out - so he proceeds to pay. When he does, he is alerted to Virtuous Circle's introductory offer of a small Summer Berries dessert pizza for $6. Before Jason adds it he can see how it will affect the scores for the meal. They're still in the green zone, so he goes ahead. Jason enters his payment details and watches while his credit card is validated. Sitting down in front of the TV, he can easily keep an eye on the progress of his order. He watches as their order moves from 'received' to 'preparing' to 'cooking' and finally to 'on its way'. The app alerts him when the order is 5 minutes away. Time to set the table! LET’S SEE ONE PLOT Jason and Grace are a busy working couple living in the inner city. Jason works as a civil engineer and drives a lot to different construction sites for work. Grace works as a lawyer at a big city law firm and is completing an MBA. With less and less time for exercise, Jason and Grace have at least been trying to improve their eating habits. They thought about those home-delivered pre-cooked meals but, as Grace says: "They just seem so sterile!". On Wednesday night, Jason gets home from work around 7pm. He collects the mail on the way in and dumps it on the table. Grace isn't home yet. She messaged him to say she was on her way and asked him to organise dinner. There's no way Jason is going to cook at this hour, so it looks like take away again... That's when Jason notices the flier from a new pizza company called “Virtuous Circle” on the table. Apparently, they offer the convenience of fast food with the nutritional value of home cooked. Intrigued, Jason loads up Virtuous Circle's mobile app. Jason immediately gets to work ordering the pizzas. Interestingly, the app starts by asking how many people he is ordering for. Jason browses the pizza options. Grace is vegetarian, so he filters the list to make things easier. The Black Bean Salsa pizza looks good. He adds one medium to the order. When he does, he sees a running total of calories, carbohydrates, fat and salt for their order - represented as a percentage of the daily recommended intake for 2 people. Hmm, the salt level is a bit higher than the average - and Grace has been told to watch her blood pressure. Jason finds an alternative - Broccoli and Rocket. He adds that and removes the Black Bean Salsa from the order. Cool. He then finds a pizza for himself: Lamb Lahmahjoon. He checks the ingredients. Jason is allergic to onions, so he removes the shallots. He replaces them with baby spinach then adds the second pizza to their order. The nutritional information for the whole order checks out - so he proceeds to pay. When he does, he is alerted to Virtuous Circle's introductory offer of a small Summer Berries dessert pizza for $6. Before Jason adds it he can see how it will affect the scores for the meal. They're still in the green zone, so he goes ahead. Jason enters his payment details and watches while his credit card is validated. Sitting down in front of the TV, he can easily keep an eye on the progress of his order. He watches as their order moves from 'received' to 'preparing' to 'cooking' and finally to 'on its way'. The app alerts him when the order is 5 minutes away. Time to set the table! LET’S SEE ONE THEME (THE PRODUCT AS SOLUTION) Jason and Grace are a busy working couple living in the inner city. Jason works as a civil engineer and drives a lot to different construction sites for work. Grace works as a lawyer at a big city law firm and is completing an MBA. With less and less time for exercise, Jason and Grace have at least been trying to improve their eating habits. They thought about those home-delivered pre-cooked meals but, as Grace says: "They just seem so sterile!". On Wednesday night, Jason gets home from work around 7pm. He collects the mail on the way in and dumps it on the table. Grace isn't home yet. She messaged him to say she was on her way and asked him to organise dinner. There's no way Jason is going to cook at this hour, so it looks like take away again... That's when Jason notices the flier from a new pizza company called “Virtuous Circle” on the table. Apparently, they offer the convenience of fast food with the nutritional value of home cooked. Intrigued, Jason loads up Virtuous Circle's mobile app. Jason immediately gets to work ordering the pizzas. Interestingly, the app starts by asking how many people he is ordering for. Jason browses the pizza options. Grace is vegetarian, so he filters the list to make things easier. The Black Bean Salsa pizza looks good. He adds one medium to the order. When he does, he sees a running total of calories, carbohydrates, fat and salt for their order - represented as a percentage of the daily recommended intake for 2 people. Hmm, the salt level is a bit higher than the average - and Grace has been told to watch her blood pressure. Jason finds an alternative - Broccoli and Rocket. He adds that and removes the Black Bean Salsa from the order. Cool. He then finds a pizza for himself: Lamb Lahmahjoon. He checks the ingredients. Jason is allergic to onions, so he removes the shallots. He replaces them with baby spinach then adds the second pizza to their order. The nutritional information for the whole order checks out - so he proceeds to pay. When he does, he is alerted to Virtuous Circle's introductory offer of a small Summer Berries dessert pizza for $6. Before Jason adds it he can see how it will affect the scores for the meal. They're still in the green zone, so he goes ahead. Jason enters his payment details and watches while his credit card is validated. Sitting down in front of the TV, he can easily keep an eye on the progress of his order. He watches as their order moves from 'received' to 'preparing' to 'cooking' and finally to 'on its way'. The app alerts him when the order is 5 minutes away. Time to set the table! LET’S SEE ONE THINGS TO NOTICE CHARACTER SETTING CONFLICT OR CHALLENGE PLOT THEME JASON AND GRACE, AND A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THEM AS PEOPLE AT HOME, AFTER WORK TRYING TO IMPROVE EATING HABITS, BUT BUSY BEGINNING (PROBLEM), MIDDLE (ACTION) AND END (RESOLUTION) OUR PRODUCT
  5. 5. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris SCENARIOS WE USE SCENARIOS TO ENVISAGE HOW A NEW PRODUCT OR SERVICE WILL BE USED IN PEOPLE’S LIVES  Does the product fit with the way people need to work?  Are new behaviours implied by the scenario realistic?  Are the product features described actually desirable and feasible? SCENARIOS ARE OUR FIRST DESIGNS SCENARIOS CAN ALSO DESCRIBE THE STATUS QUO (“CURRENT STATE SCENARIO”) Capturing the opportunity in a compelling, contextualised way scenarios are our first designs A STORY, NOT AN EPIC YOUR SCENARIO DOESN’T NEED MAJOR PLOT TWISTS OR EPIC BATTLES  It probably does need a happy ending, though, and…  it certainly does have a protagonist. BUT… SOMETHING THAT MAKES A COMPELLING STORY MAKES A COMPELLING PRODUCT OR PRODUCT FEATURE  So don't be afraid to look for a little drama or emotion. CURRENT STATE SCENARIO BARBARA – THE “DESIGNATED SEARCHER” Barbara has always liked looking things up. Her job as a writer and editor for a technical magazine lets her explore new topics for articles. In addition to the Web, she has access to news sources, legal and medical databases, and online publication archives. Recently, a friend was diagnosed with colon cancer. She helped him identify the best hospitals for this cancer and read up on the latest treatments. She looked for clinical trials that might help him, and even read up on some alternative treatments being offered in Mexico and Switzerland. She was glad to be able to find articles in journals she trusted to give her depth that more popular medical sites lacked. Storytelling for User Experience: Crafting Stories for Better Design Whitney Quesenbery, Kevin Brooks. 2010
  6. 6. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris ELEMENTS OF A SCENARIO  A specific person (or people) in a specific situation  A challenge or opportunity  A resolution  Describe the information in and out  Include people’s inner dialogue and emotional state  No user interface! SCENARIOS THROUGHOUT THE PROJECT LIFECYCLE BUT ALSO  Capture current experience  Sell the concept  Get everyone on the same page By externalising thoughts and stipulating the end result (not HOW it will work)  Script for design (divide the design space)  Script for testing  Primer for marketing, training, documentation… Envision the new experience AUDIENCE Storytelling for User Experience: Crafting Stories for Better Design Whitney Quesenbery, Kevin Brooks. 2010 WHERE DO SCENARIOS COME FROM? IDEALLY, USER RESEARCH A real story that resonated with you OR, PERSONAS MAY BE THE INSPIRATION OR, USER GOALS AND BUSINESS GOALS Look for interesting relationships between them OR, COMBINE USER STORIES/USE CASES If they exist already.
  7. 7. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris PERSONAS AND SCENARIOS SCENARIOS NEED CHARACTERS, AND PERSONAS ARE THE PERFECT SOURCE… "JUST AS PERSONAS MAKE USERS COME ALIVE FOR USER EXPERIENCE DESIGNERS, STORIES MAKE USERS’ LIVES REAL". Ginny Riddish, foreword to "Storytelling for User Experience ", Whitney Quesenbery & Kevin Brooks, 2010 PEOPLE WITH A PROBLEM LET’S GET STARTED! SCENARIO STEPS 1. IDENTIFY A PRODUCT/SERVICE 2. CHARACTER(S) 3. PLOT 4. DRAFT SCENARIO 5. REVIEW EXERCISES A SCENARIO PRODUCT/SERVICE GROUP A AN AIRLINE WANTS TO MAKE MORE USE OF ITS IN-SEAT ENTERTAINMENT SCREENS BY ALLOWING FREQUENT FLIERS TO LOGIN AND PERFORM A RANGE OF ACTIVITIES. IS THAT A GOOD IDEA? STEP 1 GROUP B A NEW RESTAURANT HOPES TO ATTRACT A YOUNG TECH-SAVVY CROWD BY INSTALLING LARGE-FORMAT MULTI-TOUCH SCREENS IN ALL ITS TABLES. BUT WHAT SHOULD IT DO WITH THEM? Or… A product or service of your choice. B
  8. 8. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris SCENARIO STEPS 1.  IDENTIFY A PRODUCT/SERVICE 2. CHARACTER(S) 3. PLOT 4. DRAFT SCENARIO 5. REVIEW EXERCISES CHARACTER(S) IN YOUR GROUPS, BRAINSTORM POSSIBLE CUSTOMERS/USERS FOR YOUR PRODUCT OR SERVICE.  What types of people would find the product/service useful  What problems or opportunities do they have? (“Jobs”)  What motivates them? (“Gains”)  What frustrates them? (“Pains”) YOU HAVE 5 MINUTES STEP 2. CHOOSE ONE MAIN CHARACTER AND COMPLETE THE “CUSTOMER SEGMENT” HALF OF A “VALUE PROPOSITION CANVAS”.  When you are ready, draw the Customer Segment diagram for your main character as a group. Large enough for others to see, please. YOU HAVE 5 MINUTES CHARACTERS CUSTOMER JOBS Goals Problems Opportunities GAINS Motivators Delighters PAINS Frustrations Fears Failure STEP 2. 5 MINUTES 
  9. 9. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris SHOW AND TELL CHARACTERS SCENARIO STEPS 1.  IDENTIFY A PRODUCT/SERVICE 2.  CHARACTER(S) 3. PLOT 4. DRAFT SCENARIO 5. REVIEW EXERCISES PLOT SCENARIO PLOTS SHOULD FOCUS ON THE KEY BENEFITS OF THE PRODUCT, AND HOW PEOPLE WILL REALISE THAT BENEFIT. STEP 3  What is the setting in which the product will be used?  Will it be used for extended amounts of time?  Is the persona frequently interrupted?  Are there multiple users?  What other products is it used with?  How much complexity is reasonable?  What primary activities does the persona need to accomplish to meet her goals?  What is the expected end result of using the product? Adapted from Kim Goodwin in About Face, Cooper et al. DON’T MAKE THINGS TOO EASY ADD SOME (MANAGEABLE) CHALLENGES ALONG THE WAY… It's 11am and Elizabeth is just returning from her coffee break. She turns the corner into the hospital receiving dock and immediately notices a 7 foot tall patient lifting machine has been left on the dock! There's no-one in sight. "Here we go, what am I supposed to with this?!?!", she thinks. She can tell the machine is not new, so it presumably belongs to the hospital. She starts by looking for a barcode. The good news is, she finds one. The bad news is the barcode scanner won't reach from her desk against the wall. So she memorises the last 4 digits and walks over to the laptop… STEP 3 - PLOT ADD SOME (MANAGEABLE) CHALLENGES ALONG THE WAY… It's 11am and Elizabeth is just returning from her coffee break. She turns the corner into the hospital receiving dock and immediately notices a 7 foot tall patient lifting machine has been left on the dock! There's no-one in sight. "Here we go, what am I supposed to with this?!?!", she thinks. She can tell the machine is not new, so it presumably belongs to the hospital. She starts by looking for a barcode. The good news is, she finds one. The bad news is the barcode scanner won't reach from her desk against the wall. So she memorises the last 4 digits and walks over to the laptop…
  10. 10. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris TASK SCENARIOS ONCE YOU’VE IDENTIFIED YOUR CHARACTERS, YOU CAN START TO THINK ABOUT PLOTS. ‘TASK SCENARIOS’* ARE ONE SENTENCE DESCRIPTIONS OF A USER TASK OR GOAL “Mark needs to schedule pump maintenance for this weekend.” “Alka’s friends split the dinner bill.” “Shane researches a trip to India.” “Arvid buys his first family car.” *My term STEP 3 PLOT PLOT – TASK SCENARIOS IN YOUR GROUP Quickly Brainstorm 5 task scenarios (One sentence each) STEP 3 – PART 1 YOU HAVE 5 MINUTES EXAMPLE “Mark needs to schedule pump maintenance for this weekend.” PLOT WHAT IS YOUR CHARACTER’S:  Situation? Context, Location  Problem? Job, Challenge, Opportunity WHAT WILL HAPPEN?  What are the basic steps? WHAT IS THE RESOLUTION?  How did your product or service help? STEP 3 – PART 2 YOUR TASK AS A GROUP  Select one task scenario to flesh out from the last step  Brainstorm the plot  Write out the main steps of your plot in bullet points* YOU HAVE 10 MINUTES * This is not your scenario! We are just preparing… SHOW AND TELL PLOT
  11. 11. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris SCENARIO STEPS 1.  IDENTIFY A PRODUCT/SERVICE 2.  CHARACTER(S) 3.  PLOT 4. DRAFT SCENARIO 5. REVIEW EXERCISES BREAK SCENARIO TEMPLATE INTRODUCTION <Character> is… They need to… They start by… BODY Goal, Action, Response, Assess (Repeat) RESOLUTION <Character> feels <emotion> that… STEP 4 Action ResponseAssess Goal SCENARIO TEMPLATE Kylie Crisp has been working in the education sales team for 6 months and is comfortable with most sales calls. Every morning she comes in to work and opens her activity centre, which shows her list of pending tasks. It’s Monday morning, so she needs to take care of all the training enrolments that came in over the web on the weekend She starts by sorting her tasks by type so she can see all the enrolments first. Kylie reads the first training request. It’s from Susan Armstrong, who has requested a quote for enrolling 3 people for the MegaPlan Software Fundamentals course on November 2-3 in Melbourne. Kylie recognises Susan as a regular customer. It’s important to keep priority customers happy, so she immediately brings up the course availability. Fortunately, there are 4 places left, so she places 3 on hold… … With her first request for the day done, Susan feels confident she’ll get through them all by lunchtime. STEP 4 - EXAMPLE
  12. 12. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris SCENARIO TEMPLATE Kylie Crisp has been working in the education sales team for 6 months and is comfortable with most sales calls. Every morning she comes in to work and opens her activity centre, which shows her list of pending tasks. It’s Monday morning, so she needs to take care of all the training enrolments that came in over the web on the weekend She starts by sorting her tasks by type so she can see all the enrolments first. Kylie reads the first training request. It’s from Susan Armstrong, who has requested a quote for enrolling 3 people for the MegaPlan Software Fundamentals course on November 2-3 in Melbourne. Kylie recognises Susan as a regular customer. It’s important to keep priority customers happy, so she immediately brings up the course availability. Fortunately, there are 4 places left, so she places 3 on hold… … With her first request for the day done, Susan feels confident she’ll get through them all by lunchtime. STEP 4 - EXAMPLE Character is… They need to… They start by… Response Assess Goal Action Response Character feels… SCENARIO RULES  BE SPECIFIC Don’t describe every possible situation  INCLUDE A CHALLENGE A reasonable roadblock to overcome  WRITE IN PROSE Sentences, not bullet points  INCLUDE INTERNAL DIALOG Reactions, plans  DESCRIBE EMOTION How does the character feel?  DESCRIBE THE INFORMATION IN AND OUT What information or actions does the user provide, what information is provided in response?  DON’T DESCRIBE THE USER INTERFACE Design the experience, not the controls or presentation STEP 4 WHY WRITE IN PROSE? • Forces you to think about context • Forces you to think about flow DRAFT SCENARIO INTRODUCTION <Character> is… They need to… They start by… BODY RESOLUTION <Character> feels <emotion> that… STEP 4 RULES  BE SPECIFIC  INCLUDE A CHALLENGE  WRITE IN PROSE  INCLUDE INTERNAL DIALOG  DESCRIBE EMOTION  DESCRIBE THE INFORMATION IN AND OUT  DON’T DESCRIBE THE USER INTERFACE YOU HAVE 20 MINUTES Action ResponseAssess Goal SHOW AND TELL DRAFT SCENARIO
  13. 13. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris SCENARIO STEPS 1.  IDENTIFY A PRODUCT/SERVICE 2.  CHARACTER(S) 3.  PLOT 4.  DRAFT SCENARIO 5. REVIEW EXERCISES Review Review by • Product owners • Marketing • Sales • Support and training • Technical staff • And users STEP 5 Because they are stories, Scenarios are ideal for review • They reveal how new products will integrate into people’s larger lives • They capture the interplay with other products and services • They focus on workflow The sequence of user activity is one of the most important things to get right • They reveal feature priorities • They are easy to relate to REVIEW PAIR UP WITH A TEAM FROM THE OTHER PRODUCT GROUP  Each team presents their scenario  The other team provides feedback  Make edits to your scenario YOU HAVE 10 MINUTES (5 MINUTES PER TEAM) STEP 5 THINGS TO LOOK FOR  BE SPECIFIC  INCLUDE A CHALLENGE  WRITE IN PROSE  INCLUDE INTERNAL DIALOG  DESCRIBE EMOTION  DESCRIBE THE INFORMATION IN AND OUT  DON’T DESCRIBE THE USER INTERFACE SCENARIO STEPS 1.  IDENTIFY A PRODUCT/SERVICE 2.  CHARACTER(S) 3.  PLOT 4.  DRAFT SCENARIO 5.  REVIEW EXERCISES
  14. 14. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris NEXT STEPS NEXT STEPS FOR YOUR SCENARIOS ILLUSTRATED SCENARIOS Sketches to flesh out the scenario screens STORYBOARD Illustrations of the context of use JOURNEY MAPS STORY MAPS Break down scenario and identify UI and technical details (in text) USER STORIES / USE CASES WIREFRAMES WRAP UP SCENARIOS MAKE DESIGN APPROACHABLE SCENARIOS HELP AVOID ’BLANK PAGE’ SYNDROME  You don’t have to design the whole product, only this flow COMBINE ILLUSTRATED SCENARIOS TO FORM AN OVERALL INTERACTION MODEL  Making adjustments as necessary
  15. 15. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris HOW MANY SCENARIOS? DON’T USE SCENARIOS TO DESCRIBE EVERY POSSIBLE FLOW AND FUNCTION FOR A TYPICAL PHONE APPLICATION, I MIGHT CONSIDER UP TO 6 SCENARIOS FOCUS ON THE MAIN END-TO-END FLOWS THAT SUPPORT THE VALUE PROPOSITION  We need to get these right YOU MIGHT ALSO ADD 1-2 ‘CRITICAL SCENARIOS’  Scenarios that don’t happen often, but you need to get right. SCENARIOS THROUGHOUT THE PROJECT LIFECYCLE BUT ALSO  Capture current experience  Sell the concept  Get everyone on the same page By externalising thoughts and stipulating the end result (not HOW it will work)  Script for design (divide the design space)  Script for testing  Primer for marketing, training, documentation… Envision the new experience SCENARIOS IN PRACTICE YOU DON’T HAVE TO FOLLOW TODAY’S PROCESS EXACTLY  We’ve followed a very structured process today  You don’t need to break scenario creation up in to as many steps. SCENARIOS ARE MOST USEFUL FOR TRANSACTIONAL PRODUCTS  But still have a place for ‘browsing’ products. TIPS DESIGN WORKSHOPS  Scenario writing is useful early in the project to introduce the role (and importance) of user experience  Team members, stakeholders and users can contribute to scenarios.  Don’t get too caught up with feasibility. Technical discussions can quickly shut down the scenario process. Allow the team to maintain their creativity SCENARIOS  USE ‘STORY’ TO HELP THE READER RELATE TO THE USER  FOCUS ON END TO END FLOW  TAKE CONTEXT INTO ACCOUNT  CAPTURE EMOTION AND INTERNAL DIALOG  ARE EASY TO WRITE  ARE ACCESSIBLE TO EVERYONE  ARE YOUR FIRST DESIGN
  16. 16. SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN UX Singapore, 2016 - Shane Morris SCENARIOS ARE YOUR FIRST DESIGN EVEN THOUGH THEY DON’T DESCRIBE THE USER INTERFACE Shane Morris @shanemo shane@automaticstudio.com.au SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN THANK YOU DESIGNING WITH SCENARIOS: PUTTING PERSONAS TO WORK KIM GOODWIN articles.uie.com/designing_scenarios/ STORYTELLING FOR USER EXPERIENCE WHITNEY QUESENBERY & KEVIN BROOKS Rosenfeld Media USING STORIES FOR A BETTER USER EXPERIENCE WHITNEY QUESENBERY & KEVIN BROOKS www.writersua.com/articles/stories/ USING SCENARIOS UX THINK uxthink.wordpress.com/2010/11/30/using _scenarios/ RESOURCES

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