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Workshop #12: Research toolbox: Exploring innovation opportunities, emotion and desirability by Miriam Walker

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This workshop will help you select the best research methods for transformational projects – where innovation, desirability, and real-world relevance are essential. You will also practice a selection of techniques for involving users in designing products and services.

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Workshop #12: Research toolbox: Exploring innovation opportunities, emotion and desirability by Miriam Walker

  1. 1. . . Research toolbox: Exploring innovation opportunities, emotion 
 and desirability Miriam Walker 9 September 2016
 @miriamswalker
  2. 2. . . Commerical in Confidence 2 Intros 9:30 Purpose of exploratory research 9:50 Transforming through research 10:10 Choosing research methods 10:20 Break 10:45 Personal journey maps 10:55 Magic thing 11:30 Microsoft Product Reaction Cards 12:00 Wrap up 12:10 Agenda
  3. 3. . . Commerical in Confidence 3 Introduction Your name" Your role" " What you’d like to learn today
  4. 4. . . Understand the role of exploratory research
 Introduction Commerical in Confidence 4 Understand the potential of research to transform 
 Learn to apply three research methods: •  Personal journey maps •  Magic Thing •  Microsoft Product Reaction Cards Get better at choosing research methods for exploration
 What you’ll learn!
  5. 5. . . . . Commerical in Confidence 5 Purpose of exploratory research
  6. 6. . . Commerical in Confidence 6 Purpose of exploratory research British Design Council: Double Diamond!
  7. 7. . . Commerical in Confidence 7 Purpose of exploratory research Digital Arts Network (Auckland) Discover Design Implement Measure Measured
 Outcome Business
 Objective
  8. 8. . . Exploration helps us find 
 opportunities by: •  Understanding users •  Environments •  Business goals and technology Commerical in Confidence 8 Purpose of exploratory research Types of research
  9. 9. . . Commerical in Confidence 9 Transforming through research" What don’t you ! know, that you ! don’t know?!
  10. 10. . . Evaluation helps us 
 
 select and iterate to: •  Choose the best ideas •  Refine and improve design •  Find problems Commerical in Confidence 10 Purpose of exploratory research Types of research
  11. 11. . . Measurement helps us: •  Understand what changed because of our design •  Identify areas for further improvement Commerical in Confidence 11 Purpose of exploratory research Types of research
  12. 12. . . Purpose of exploratory research Commerical in Confidence 12 What research methods " have you used? Two minutes to write down as many 
 research methods as you’ve used 
 (one per Post It)
  13. 13. . . Purpose of exploratory research Commerical in Confidence 13 What don’t you know that " you don’t know? Which of your research methods are 
 best at finding the things that 
 you don’t know to ask? Stick your research method 
 
 Post-Its on the wall
  14. 14. . . . . Commerical in Confidence 14 Transforming through research
  15. 15. . . Transforming through research Commerical in Confidence 15 Coach and train new researchers Demonstrate your methods to a colleague Show the value by sharing outcomes and insights Get product managers and business owners to observe Provide input for business strategy and purpose Explore opportunities, not just pain points Create a user centred culture and organisation
  16. 16. . . Transforming through research Commerical in Confidence 16 Hearts and ! minds! In small groups, 10 minutes to share your experiences: 1.  How have you shared your research? 2.  Who did you involve? 3.  What were your goals by involving them? 4.  What was the impact?
  17. 17. . . . . Commerical in Confidence 17 Choosing exploratory research methods
  18. 18. . . Commerical in Confidence 18 Dian Fossey An Anthropologist who researched Gorillas http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30313306 Choosing exploratory research methods
  19. 19. . . Commerical in Confidence 19 The pinnacle of qualitative research? •  What questions was Dian " trying to answer? •  What methods did she use? •  What were the strengths and weaknesses of her methods? Choosing exploratory research methods
  20. 20. . . Commerical in Confidence 20 Choosing exploratory research methods Scientists seek a " universal truth By Rich Gold- approx 2001?
  21. 21. . . Choosing exploratory research methods Commerical in Confidence 21 Scientific research often starts with a belief (the hypothesis) E.g. chocolate helps people to sleep The holy grail of science " research is proof
  22. 22. . . Choosing exploratory research methods Commerical in Confidence 22 An experiment is designed to gather data to test the hypothesis (the methodology). E.g. For 30 nights, students eat 100g dark choc at 9pm and rate their sleep /10 at 8am. The holy grail of science " research is proof
  23. 23. . . Choosing exploratory research methods Commerical in Confidence 23 We try to avoid bias from participants and researchers. E.g. Give 100g identical fake choc on half the nights. Each student has both fake and real chocolate (on different nights). The holy grail of science " research is proof
  24. 24. . . Choosing exploratory research methods Commerical in Confidence 24 We run statistics to test whether we have supported or disproved the hypothesis. E.g. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test indicates that sleeping after chocolate was significantly better than with fake chocolate Z = 21 p=0.027. The holy grail of science " research is proof
  25. 25. . . Choosing exploratory research methods Commerical in Confidence 25 But we can’t conclusively prove the hypothesis over an alternative explanation. E.g. Chocolate only increases students’ sleep OR our result applies only to Whittakers The holy grail of science " research is proof
  26. 26. . . Choosing exploratory research methods Commerical in Confidence 26 Scientific research often starts with a belief (the hypothesis) An experiment is designed to gather data to test the hypothesis (the methodology). We try to avoid bias from participants and researchers. We run statistics to test whether we have supported or disproved the hypothesis. But we can’t conclusively prove the hypothesis over an alternative explanation. E.g. chocolate helps people to sleep 
 E.g. For 30 nights, students eat 100g dark choc at 9pm and rate their sleep /10 at 8am. E.g. Give 100g identical fake choc on half the nights. Each student has both fake and real chocolate (on different nights). E.g. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test indicates that sleeping after chocolate was significantly better than with fake chocolate Z = 21 p=0.027. E.g. chocolate only increases students’ sleep OR our result applies only to Whittakers
  27. 27. . . Setting research goals
 : •  What do we want to know? •  What are the opportunities? •  Who are our target users? •  What behaviours, attitudes, environments and products do we want to understand? •  What do we already know or have? •  Who are our competitors? Commerical in Confidence 27 Choosing exploratory research methods Exploratory research questions
  28. 28. . . Choosing exploratory research methods Commerical in Confidence 28 Practicalities What research methods do you choose most often? Why do you choose those methods? What are the constraints that apply most often in your work? 10 minute group discussion. Please appoint a spokesperson to share your key points.
  29. 29. . . Research goals
 
 •  What do we want to know? •  What are the opportunities? •  Who are our target users? •  What behaviours, attitudes, environments and products do we want to understand? •  What do we already know or have? •  Who are our competitors? Commerical in Confidence 29 Choosing exploratory research methods Exploratory research " planning questions
  30. 30. . . Digital Arts Network often find 
 ourselves running usability 
 testing and interviews. These are generally 1:1 sessions Why? Commerical in Confidence 30 Choosing exploratory research methods Why are 1:1 methods " and usability testing " so popular?
  31. 31. . . •  Explore details of something 
 in the past •  Avoid assumptions about what happens/ed •  Understand emotions about current experiences •  Increase empathy and understanding from researchers •  Find new opportunities for 
 design / pain points •  Generate ideas •  Encourage positive and 
 negative feedback Commerical in Confidence 31 Choosing exploratory research methods Why expand our " techniques?
  32. 32. . . Commerical in Confidence 32 10 minute break
  33. 33. . . . . Commerical in Confidence 33 Personal Journey Maps
  34. 34. . . Commerical in Confidence 34 Personal Journey Maps Deciding to visit New Zealand
  35. 35. . . Identify areas for improvement, based on pain points with a current experience.
 Explore experiences that take place over time (e.g. medical conditions from symptoms, through diagnosis and treatment) Explore strong emotions Understand where the user interacts with multiple touch-points.
 Commerical in Confidence 35 Personal Journey Maps Why map the journey " of an individual?
  36. 36. . . Start with real stories and experiences Avoid creating journey maps that are aggregations of idealised user behaviour and experiences Exploring both positive and negative experiences. Commerical in Confidence 36 Personal Journey Maps How we map the journey
  37. 37. . . 1.  Provide the prompt “Tell me about your experience of …" 2.  Ask your participant to describe the steps 3.  Write one step per Post-It and add to the timeline 4.  Probe gently with “how did that feel” for painpoints and move the Post-Its up and down 5.  Probe for more details on key touch- points and steps – add more Post-Its into the timeline 6.  Use additional prompts “What happened next?” ”What did you do?” “What did you use?” “What did you see?” “Who did you talk to ?” “Who was with you?” “What did you say?” Commerical in Confidence 37 The Process
  38. 38. . . •  A user recounts a real experience from their lives •  The user talks the researcher through each step •  Add actions and interactions (touchpoints) at every step •  Add emotions and pain points - probe and prompt gently •  Identify pain points and areas for improvement •  Discuss any obvious ideas for improvement (but don’t expect to solve everything in the session) Commerical in Confidence 38 Personal Journey Maps Mapping the journey " together
  39. 39. . . Prompts: Where did you start? What happened? What happened next? Where did you start? What happened? What happened next? Commerical in Confidence 39 Personal Journey Maps Map of visiting the airport In groups of five people, the person who visited the airport most recently is your research participant.
 
 Story: Tell me about the last time you visited the airport. 

  40. 40. . . Personal Journey Maps to: 
 •  Explore details of something
 in the past •  Understand emotions •  Increase empathy and understanding from researchers •  Find new opportunities and problems •  Avoid assumptions about 
 what happens/ed Commerical in Confidence 40 Personal Journey Maps Why would we use Personal Journey Maps?
  41. 41. . . . . Commerical in Confidence 41 Magic Thing
  42. 42. . . “Imagine you had a magic thing that could [solve your problems / make your life better / manage your health / achieve your goals / make travel more enjoyable / help you save money] …” Make a prototype! Sketch, act, construct. Commerical in Confidence 42 Personal Journey Maps Use, imagine or create " a magic thing
  43. 43. . . •  What happens? •  What does your magic thing do? •  Why does that help you? •  What happens next? •  How does your magic thing change your life? •  How often would you do this? When? •  Where would you do it? •  How important is this to you? Commerical in Confidence 43 Personal Journey Maps Probes for each usage scenario
  44. 44. . . •  Problems, pain points and opportunities •  Ideas for solutions (though this is more about understanding the opportunity for innovation than solving a problem) •  You will be able to probe on why, when and how the problem happens •  Where and when a product or service might be used •  Ideas for using a new technology (e.g. this technique was used to explore mobile connected devices – in the 1990s) Commerical in Confidence 44 Personal Journey Maps What will you learn
  45. 45. . . But magic thing is not so useful for understanding: •  How usage will evolve over time •  The effect of advertising or other marketing on expectations of how something will be used Commerical in Confidence 45 Personal Journey Maps What will you learn
  46. 46. . . Ideas for clients (or create 
 your own) a)  Client A helps families hire nannies b)  Client B creates products for endurance triathletes c)  Client C specialises in adventure travel for people in wheelchairs Commerical in Confidence 46 Choosing exploratory research methods Activity: Plan a Magic Thing activity In pairs, you have 10 minutes to • Pick a client • Decide what you want to learn • Decide who to recruit • Write your Magic Thing instructions
  47. 47. . . To deepen the scenario and add realism, ask participants to: •  Make a model of their magic thing (playdough, popsicle sticks, pipecleaners) or sketch a picture and explain it •  Give it a name •  Tell you “What is the first thing you see when you open it up?” •  Prompt with “What else does it do?” •  Ask “How has it made your life better?” •  Perhaps act or roleplay with the the interviewer Commerical in Confidence 47 Personal Journey Maps Extending Magic Thing
  48. 48. . . Outside an interview: •  Use magic thing in a group, for role- playing with others. To explore social and group usage. •  Ask participants to carry their magic thing for several days and keep a note of how they use it - to explore mobility, time and real life needs. Some researchers have observed magic thing usage over several days. Commerical in Confidence 48 Personal Journey Maps Extending Magic Thing
  49. 49. . . Magic Thing to understand: •  Pain points •  Expectations •  Explore opportunities for design •  (Sometimes) generate ideas •  Explore opportunities Commerical in Confidence 49 Personal Journey Maps Why would we use " Magic Thing?
  50. 50. . . . . Commerical in Confidence 50 Microsoft Product Reaction Cards
  51. 51. . . We want to know if a product or service is desirable. But: •  There is no single characteristic or behaviour that makes products desirable (E.g. are we aiming for clean and easy-to- use OR engaging and inspiring) •  Qualitative feedback is hard to summarise and compare across participants and products •  Negative feedback can be hard to elicit from participants – people want to please •  Comparing the product team’s goal with users’ experiences can feel like conflict Commerical in Confidence 51 Microsoft Product Reaction Cards Why is desirability hard to measure?
  52. 52. . . Microsoft Product Reaction Cards Commerical in Confidence 52 The complete set of 118 Product Reaction Cards Accessible Creative Fast Meaningful Slow Advanced Customizable Flexible Motivating Sophisticated Annoying Cutting edge Fragile Not Secure Stable Appealing Dated Fresh Not Valuable Sterile Approachable Desirable Friendly Novel Stimulating Attractive Difficult Frustrating Old Straight Forward Boring Disconnected Fun Optimistic Stressful Business-like Disruptive Gets in the way Ordinary Time-consuming Busy Distracting Hard to Use Organized Time-Saving Calm Dull Helpful Overbearing Too Technical Clean Easy to use High quality Overwhelming Trustworthy Clear Effective Impersonal Patronizing Unapproachable Collaborative Efficient Impressive Personal Unattractive Comfortable Effortless Incomprehensible Poor quality Uncontrollable Compatible Empowering Inconsistent Powerful Unconventional Compelling Energetic Ineffective Predictable Understandable Complex Engaging Innovative Professional Undesirable Comprehensive Entertaining Inspiring Relevant Unpredictable Confident Enthusiastic Integrated Reliable Unrefined Confusing Essential Intimidating Responsive Usable Connected Exceptional Intuitive Rigid Useful Consistent Exciting Inviting Satisfying Valuable Controllable Expected Irrelevant Secure   Convenient Familiar Low Maintenance Simplistic  
  53. 53. . . Ask: •  How does using this product made you feel? •  How does this service made you feel? •  How would you like to feel when using this product? •  How would we like users of this product to feel about the product? Commerical in Confidence 53 Microsoft Product Reaction Cards Prompts Invite participants to 
 pick 5 words
  54. 54. . . The only word that’s ever misfired 
 is Simplistic
 Google search dictionary: “treating complex issues and problems as if they were much simpler than they really are.” 
 The meaning is negative But ”simplistic” is often misinterpreted as a fancy word for “simple”. So people think it’s positive. Commerical in Confidence 54 Microsoft Product Reaction Cards A caution – “Simplistic” " is confusing
  55. 55. . . Commerical in Confidence 55 Microsoft Product Reaction Cards Beware the word cloud Word clouds are misleading and not helpful for summarising qualitative data Phrases get split and lose meaning or context e.g. “Not helpful” or “Easy to use” “don’t like” Some words have different meanings in different contexts
  56. 56. . . 1.  Form product teams 2.  Each team has a secret product. Shhhh! 3.  Open your teams’ secret product envelope. 4.  Each person picks the five words that would make you love this product 5.  Combine your words - vote using coloured dots 6.  – which words got the most votes for your product? 7.  Fill in your product poster (five minutes) Report back: “My ideal [product] is (word 1, word 2, word 3, word 4) Commerical in Confidence 56 Microsoft Product Reaction Cards Activity: Describe desirability for your secret product
  57. 57. . . Commerical in Confidence 57 Microsoft Product Reaction Cards Two minutes to guess the products " Put post-it notes with your guess next to the poster
  58. 58. . . Commerical in Confidence 58 Microsoft Product Reaction Cards Product Reaction " Card usage Use Microsoft Product Reaction 
 Cards to: •  Understand the feeling you are trying to create •  Test or demonstrate a prototype or product with users •  Compare products (e.g. against competitor’s products) •  Talk to current customers
  59. 59. . . . . Commerical in Confidence 59 Wrap up
  60. 60. . . Commerical in Confidence 60 Wrap up Responding to " briefs In groups, review your brief: •  What questions do you want to answer? •  What risks do you see in this project? •  What research methods could you apply?
  61. 61. . . Commerical in Confidence 61 Wrap up Why did we learn these techniques? Personal Journey Maps to: •  Explore the past •  Understand emotions •  Increase empathy •  Find new opportunities •  Avoid assumptions
  62. 62. . . Commerical in Confidence 62 Wrap up Why did we learn these techniques? Magic Thing to understand: •  Pain points •  Explore opportunities for design •  (Sometimes) generate ideas
  63. 63. . . Commerical in Confidence 63 ClosWrap upe Why did we learn these techniques? Microsoft Product Reaction Cards: •  Elicit the desired and actual experience qualitatively •  Get positive and negative feedback •  Allow comparison between participants and products •  Make it easy to summarise qualitative data
  64. 64. . . Wrap up Commerical in Confidence 64 What worked well? What could be improved? Session feedback

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