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Louise Bloom - T-shaped skills save lives (and products). How and why to learn laterally for better outcomes

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Louise Bloom - T-shaped skills save lives (and products). How and why to learn laterally for better outcomes

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Product development requires the work of lots of different people with different skills to deliver their best efforts. So it’s natural we want to be the best at what we do. When those people work in silos and can’t share ideas or communicate, products suffer. Creating ‘t-shaped’ skill sets, with deep knowledge of your own field and insight into those around you, can help.

Using examples from the NHS, where multidisciplinary team working is critical to patient outcomes and supported by a culture of lateral learning and knowledge sharing, Louise looks at the benefits of knowing a little about a lot for product outcomes, team working and your own career, and shares a few surprising outcomes from her own ‘t-shaped’ approach to learning new skills.

About Louise
Louise is a Senior UX consultant professional who has spent over 15 years working for everyone from global banks to local butchers during which time she has contributed to books, blogs, conferences and podcasts on the future of work, digital wellbeing, ethical technology, and the physiology of technostress. Curious to understand more about how human-tech interactions were affecting levels of stress, Louise is now also a registered and practising Physiotherapist in the UK with a specialism in neurology.

Product development requires the work of lots of different people with different skills to deliver their best efforts. So it’s natural we want to be the best at what we do. When those people work in silos and can’t share ideas or communicate, products suffer. Creating ‘t-shaped’ skill sets, with deep knowledge of your own field and insight into those around you, can help.

Using examples from the NHS, where multidisciplinary team working is critical to patient outcomes and supported by a culture of lateral learning and knowledge sharing, Louise looks at the benefits of knowing a little about a lot for product outcomes, team working and your own career, and shares a few surprising outcomes from her own ‘t-shaped’ approach to learning new skills.

About Louise
Louise is a Senior UX consultant professional who has spent over 15 years working for everyone from global banks to local butchers during which time she has contributed to books, blogs, conferences and podcasts on the future of work, digital wellbeing, ethical technology, and the physiology of technostress. Curious to understand more about how human-tech interactions were affecting levels of stress, Louise is now also a registered and practising Physiotherapist in the UK with a specialism in neurology.

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Louise Bloom - T-shaped skills save lives (and products). How and why to learn laterally for better outcomes

  1. 1. T-shaped skills save lives* *and products
  2. 2. USER EXPERIENCE COMMS DESIGN DEV PM LEADER FINANCE Louise Bloom UX Consultant
  3. 3. Louise Bloom Physiotherapist
  4. 4. Doctor “MFFD”
  5. 5. Physio Doctor DISCHARGE PLANNING TEAM OT Nurse
  6. 6. Doctor Physiotherapist Occupational Therapist Nurse ● Could take days ● Beds blocked ● Edna deteriorates
  7. 7. ● Overwhelming ● Not enough staff ● Hard to coordinate Occupational Therapist Nurse Doctor Physiotherapist
  8. 8. PHYSIOTHERAP Y NURSE OT
  9. 9. PHYSIOTHERAP Y NURSE OT NURSE PHYSIO OT OT PHYSIO NURS E ● Shared expertise ● Patient-centred ● 2 hours
  10. 10. More efficient. More effective. More intelligent.
  11. 11. ● Formal (training) ● Self-directed (ad- hoc) ● Interpersonal (anecdotal) ● Knowledge-sharing PHYSIOTHERAP Y NURSE OT
  12. 12. T-shaped skill sets consist of a deep core skill and insight, expertise and capability into several adjacent disciplines or professions.
  13. 13. Why you?
  14. 14. ● Communicate ● Empathize ● Reflect ● Avoid isolation
  15. 15. Life is just better when you feel understood and when you can understand others.
  16. 16. ● Time ● Brain space ● Effort
  17. 17. Someone else’s job !
  18. 18. Better in and at your job. Stand out from the pack. Stay interested. Find your path. Develop the field.
  19. 19. ● Formal (training) ● Self-directed (ad-hoc) ● Interpersonal (anecdotal) ● Knowledge-sharing (culture)
  20. 20. Get the hell out of your bubble.
  21. 21. Why your team?
  22. 22. Woah! That’s a lot of resource!
  23. 23. Product Manager UX Designer Visual Designer Developer
  24. 24. ● Talk things through ● Design with insight ● Boost resource ● Learn
  25. 25. Jack of all trades, Master of some.

Editor's Notes

  • What does your skillset look like.
  • What does your skillset look like.
  • What does your skillset look like.
  • What does your skillset look like.
  • What does your skillset look like.
  • What does your skillset look like.
  • What does your skillset look like.
  • What does your skillset look like.

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