feafeafjgeioaw

167 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
167
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

feafeafjgeioaw

  1. 1. Orange presents HOW TO:not take crappy food photos ON  Instagram
  2. 2. Look for shapes and patterns. RULE#1Lines of  things  look  good.   Circles of  things  look   good.   Round   things   on   square   plates   look   good   and   vice-­‐versa.   If   you   manage   to   find   food   arranged   in   the   shape   of   a  smiley   face,   you   have   mastered   everything   you   need   to   know  about   photography   and   have   no   need   to   read   ?ps   2-­‐9,   you  prodigy  you.  
  3. 3. Look for shapes and patterns. RULE#1
  4. 4. Get all up on your food’s business. RULE#2What  does  this  mean?  Food  doesn’t  have  a  personal  bubble,  so   don’t   be   afraid   to   invade   its   space.   The   iPhone’s   ?ny  camera   packs   a   whopping   punch,   which   lets   you   get  uncomfortably   close   to  your   subject   and   capture   every   nook,   cranny,   pore,   and  blemish.   This   feature   is   the   potent   force   behind   untagged  Facebook  pics.  Luckily,  food  has   no  shame .  
  5. 5. Get all up on your food’s business. RULE#2
  6. 6. And focus on focus. RULE#3To  add  onto  Rule  #2,  here’s  a  quick  lesson  on  the  power  of  depth of field .  Put  your  food  in  the  limelight  by  bringing  the  subject  close  to  your  lens  and  locking  the  focus  on  your  phone’s  screen.*  You’ll  wind  up  with  a  sharp,  clean  foreground  and  a  delighMully  blurry  background.  *To  lock  the  focus  on  the  iPhone,  tap  the  part  of  the  screen  you’d  like  to  focus  on  before  taking  the  picture.  A  blue  square  should  appear.  Hold  the  square  un?l  “AE/AF  Lock”  appears  at  the  boTom,  and  snap  away.  
  7. 7. And focus on focus. RULE#3
  8. 8. And don’t use fake blur. RULE#4Ever.  See  Rule  #3  to  wind  up  with  a  quality  photo  that  looks  less  like  a  hazy  senior  portrait.  
  9. 9. And don’t use fake blur. RULE#4 Nope.
  10. 10. Opt out of the frames. RULE#5Instagram  takes  an  electronic  dump  on  the  iPhone’s  8  MP  camera  and  “all-­‐new  op?cs”  with  a  wide  array  of    goofy frames (Yes,  I’m  referring  to  you,  “Nashville”).  The  “I-­‐just-­‐developed-­‐this-­‐roll-­‐of-­‐film”  retro  borders,  rounded  edges,  and  vigneTes  aren’t  cool  and  vintage  so  much  as  they  are  tacky  and  distrac?ng.  
  11. 11. Opt out of the frames. RULE#5 No. Yes.
  12. 12. Bump up the contrast. RULE#6Preteens   who   got   a   hold   of   new-­‐fangled   social   media   years  ago   have   this   rule   of   thumb   down   to   an   art.   Almost  everything   looks   beTer   when   dark   colors   are  darker   and   light   colors   are   lighter .  When   choosing   a   filter,   tap   the   sun   icon   on   the   boTom   le]   of  the   screen   and   see   if   that   helps.   That   way,   if   you   had   a  random   case   of   the   shakes   while   snapping   a   pic,   a   liTle  contrast  can  take  the  blur  away.  Slap  on  a  filter,  and  hooray!  You  cheated  yourself  out  of  a  terrible  photo.    
  13. 13. Bump up the contrast. RULE#6
  14. 14. Let there be natural light. RULE#7Please,  for  the  love  of  all  things  edible,  do   not  turn  your  flash  on.  Nothing  is  nas?er  than  greasy  food  appearing  even  shinier  in  a  glaring  spotlight.  (This  applies  to  point-­‐and-­‐shoot  cameras,   too.   Nine   ?mes   out   of   ten,   your   food   does   not   need  automa?c   red-­‐eye   reduc?on.)   Sunlight   through   a  window   and/or   a   restaurant’s   overhead   ligh?ng   is   plenty   of  brightness.    
  15. 15. Let there be natural light. RULE#7
  16. 16. Choose your filter wisely. RULE#8Whatever  you  do,  steer  very,  very  clear  of  Kelvin.  Instead,  test  out  one  of  the  following  food-­‐friendly  filters:  Amaro,  Hudson,  X-­‐pro  II,  Sierra,  Hefe,  Valencia  And  unless  you’re  shoo?ng  a  wedding,  there’s  no  need  to  turn  food  black  and  white.  
  17. 17. Choose your filter wisely. RULE#8 X-pro II Hudson
  18. 18. Think inside the box. RULE#9Instagram  crops  all  photos  into  squares,  so  framing  your  shot   rule of thirdswell  is  vital.  The  trick  is  to  use  the   ,  and  lucky  for  you  (and  your  followers),  Instagram  provides  you  with  a  built-­‐in  a  rule-­‐of-­‐thirds  grid  when  deciding  on  composi?on.    All  you’ve  got  to  do  is  align  your  subject  with  the  crosshairs.  
  19. 19. Think inside the box. RULE#9

×