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Networking…
The art of building and sustaining mutually beneficial relationships




                  NAAAP Women in Lead...
Topics
•   What is Networking?
•   Why is networking important?      Very important:
                                     ...
Definitions & Comparisons

• Definition of Networking
  • Creating a group of acquaintances and associates and
    keeping...
Definitions & Comparisons
• Definition of Mentoring
  • Employee training system under which a more
    experienced indivi...
Networking - A Process and a Discipline,
Not An Event
           Networking is                          Networking isn’t
•...
Understanding About Networking

• Why is networking important?
• What can be accomplished by networking?
• Who is in my Ne...
Why is Networking Important?

• Professional Presence & Exposure
• Your Career Needs, Job Search
• Professional Support
  ...
What Can Be Accomplished?

• Establish Professional Connections
• Career Advancement
• Gain Industry Knowledge
• Identify ...
Critical “Who’s” of Networking

    Mentors
                        Huggers


  Role        NETWORK
                      ...
Who is in my Active Network?

• People with whom I…
  • Have regular interactions in work & life
  • Reach out & interact ...
Who is (and should be) in my Network?
Industry
Associations                                         Family/
              ...
The Case for a Limited Network

• You don’t have time to nurture every
  relationship – don’t spread yourself too thinly
•...
Getting Started (Thinking) Exercise:
1. Write down 3 colleagues with whom you would like to
   refresh/start your professi...
Where can I Network?

• Online Social Networking Sites
• Conferences/Industry Events
• Social Gatherings
• Affinity Group ...
Networking Self-Assessment
• Use the right side of this   1.
  page to write your
  answers                      2.

• Ans...
Networking Self-Assessment
1. At a company-sponsored seminar, you see your manager
   standing alone. You:
   a. stand wit...
Networking Self-Assessment
4.    As a very busy person with lots of time constraints, you:
     a.   always read a local a...
Networking Self-Assessment
Score yourself: 5 points for every correct answer
1.   C, Walk over to your manager & begin a c...
Common Networking Hurdles
• Don’t want to talk with strangers
• Waiting to be properly introduced
• Being pushy, aggressiv...
Networking Hurdles – I’m introverted
• Networking is a long term •    Invite people to lunch
  investment in your career
 ...
Networking Hurdles – I’m too shy
1.    Start small
2.    Stop apologizing
3.    Tap into your primal instincts
4.    The W...
Networking Hurdles – Gender Differences
in Communications
                Men                                     Women
• ...
Networking Preparation Tips

• Adopt a positive attitude
• Focus on the benefit of the event
• Plan your self-introduction...
Working the Room

• Enter the room with confidence
• If necessary, use the buddy system
• Seek out others
• Make the most ...
Conversations – Join
• Use OAR: Observe . . . Ask . . . Reveal
• Look for smaller groups of about 2-3 people
• Look for an...
Conversations - Engage
• Active Listening Skills are critical to successful
  conversation
   • People speak 150-200 words...
Conversations – Keep it going
• Ask open-ended questions
   • Reluctant speakers may respond more easily to questions abou...
Conversations – Exiting gracefully
• End the conversation with a show of appreciation:
   • “I really enjoyed talking with...
Conversations – Ensuring lasting
connections
• Don’t hesitate to ask for business or referrals as you
  exit a conversatio...
How do you make an IMPACT at a
live networking event?
• Plan ahead! Know what you      • Initiate discussions with open
  ...
Ready, Set…Network!
• Think about 1-2 things you want to try
• Count off by X
• Group by your team number
• You’ll have as...
Ready, Set…Network! De-brief

• Did you try your new technique? How did it
  feel?
• What do you remember about the people...
Maintaining the Relationships

• Follow up, follow up, follow up!
• Use multiple communication channels
• Build and mainta...
Summary

• Networking is a critical skill for your career that
  you will use often.
• Networking isn’t easy if you’re not...
Acknowledgements

• Many thanks to Parita Patel for this material
  from GE, used as a starting basis for this
  presentat...
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Networking workshop v1 2

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Networking workshop v1 2

  1. 1. Networking… The art of building and sustaining mutually beneficial relationships NAAAP Women in Leadership Facilitator: David Lum March 13, 2010
  2. 2. Topics • What is Networking? • Why is networking important? Very important: If you learn • The “Who’s” of Networking something you • Who is (should be) in my Network? wish to try, • Networking Self-Assessment make a note • Networking hurdles of it. • Working the Room and Conversation • How to make an impact • Maintaining the relationships • Summary
  3. 3. Definitions & Comparisons • Definition of Networking • Creating a group of acquaintances and associates and keeping it active through regular communication for mutual benefit. Networking is based on the question "How can I help?" and not with "What can I get?" • Definition of Coaching • Extending traditional training methods to include focus on (1) an individual's needs and accomplishments, (2) close observation, and (3) impartial and non-judgmental feedback on performance. Coaching focuses on a specific behavior or developmental need.
  4. 4. Definitions & Comparisons • Definition of Mentoring • Employee training system under which a more experienced individual (the mentor) is assigned to act as an advisor, counselor, or guide to a junior or trainee (the mentee). The mentor is responsible for providing support to, and feedback on, the individual in his or her charge. Mentoring is focused professional development through deeper one-on-one relationships. • Definition of a Sponsor • An influential leader who is committed to the development of a person, and takes personal responsibility for advocacy, protection, and promotion. Sponsorship has a political element to it.
  5. 5. Networking - A Process and a Discipline, Not An Event Networking is Networking isn’t • A benefit to both persons to be • A process of making cold-calls to most effective people you don't know • Always a two-way street • Just contacting everyone you know when you need something • Asking your network for help when you need; be prepared to return the favor when asked • Building on a process…an ongoing lifelong way of doing business Before During After Preparation Impression Follow-Up http://www.rileyguide.com/network.html
  6. 6. Understanding About Networking • Why is networking important? • What can be accomplished by networking? • Who is in my Network and who should be in my Network? • Where can I network? • How can I make an impact?
  7. 7. Why is Networking Important? • Professional Presence & Exposure • Your Career Needs, Job Search • Professional Support • Brainstorming ideas • Information and resource sharing, seeking, giving • Tough situations • Finding and Discovering Mentors • Development and Maintenance of Social Skills
  8. 8. What Can Be Accomplished? • Establish Professional Connections • Career Advancement • Gain Industry Knowledge • Identify Business Opportunities • Access to Information & Ideas • Find Top Talent • Learn from Other’s Expertise
  9. 9. Critical “Who’s” of Networking Mentors Huggers Role NETWORK Peers Models Connectors Sponsors
  10. 10. Who is in my Active Network? • People with whom I… • Have regular interactions in work & life • Reach out & interact with 2-4 times per year • Receive & send emails, calls, IM chat
  11. 11. Who is (and should be) in my Network? Industry Associations Family/ Friends Professional You Organizations Church/Charities/ Volunteer orgs Alumni Associations Former Work Colleagues Current Work Colleagues
  12. 12. The Case for a Limited Network • You don’t have time to nurture every relationship – don’t spread yourself too thinly • The database will be too big to manage and will create more work than value to you • Not every relationship will benefit you • Pick and choose your associates & acquaintances – there’s nothing wrong with this! • Value-based two-way relationships are most meaningful • Quality of the relationship matters, not quantity
  13. 13. Getting Started (Thinking) Exercise: 1. Write down 3 colleagues with whom you would like to refresh/start your professional relationship 2. Write down something you can discuss with them (i.e., shared hobby, sports team, vacation, mutual project) 3. Write down the best way to contact them (email is not always the answer) 4. Schedule a reminder with yourself to contact them on your calendar now 5. Set a follow up meeting date 3 or 6 months out Follow up, follow up, follow up…
  14. 14. Where can I Network? • Online Social Networking Sites • Conferences/Industry Events • Social Gatherings • Affinity Group Events • Work Events • Training Events • Charity Events (e.g., NAAAP Red Orchid Gala)
  15. 15. Networking Self-Assessment • Use the right side of this 1. page to write your answers 2. • Answer the next 6 3. questions as you think 4. you would behave in that situation, not what you 5. think is the right or best 6. answer • Being honest with yourself will help you to understand you
  16. 16. Networking Self-Assessment 1. At a company-sponsored seminar, you see your manager standing alone. You: a. stand with your colleagues and keep talking. You can’t work all the time. b. just wave hello; after all, the manager may prefer to be alone. c. walk over to your manager and begin a conversation. 2. Your customer invites you to attend a community event he’s sponsoring. You: a. plan to attend and leave early, since you won’t be noticed in the crowd. b. ask if it’s appropriate to bring a colleague to keep you company. c. decline politely, saying you’re previously engaged. 3. You are in a conversation at a networking event with someone who you don’t find particularly interesting or stimulating. You: a. say “Excuse me, it was nice meeting you” & move on. b. say “I have to go” and walk away. c. continue talking until the other person excuses himself from your conversation – you don’t want to be rude. from Susan Roane’s book “How to Work a Room”
  17. 17. Networking Self-Assessment 4. As a very busy person with lots of time constraints, you: a. always read a local and national newspaper. b. often read a daily paper. c. never take time to read the paper. That’s why they invented television. 5. You see a person at a networking event who you have met before but can’t remember their name, you: a. ask, “Do you remember me?” b. say “Hello” and state your name. c. either (a) or (b) is acceptable. 6. You think a good conversationalist: a. asks questions to get the other person to do the talking. b. chimes in with stories, thoughts, observations. c. does both (a) and (b).
  18. 18. Networking Self-Assessment Score yourself: 5 points for every correct answer 1. C, Walk over to your manager & begin a conversation 2. B, Ask if its appropriate to bring a colleague 3. A, Say, “Excuse me, nice to meet you” & move on 4. A, Always read a local & national newspaper 5. B, Say “Hello” & state your name 6. C, Ask questions & chimes in with thoughts 25-30 points: You know how to make the most of a situation 20 points: You seize most opportunities, but can be better < 15 points: Opportunities are passing you by
  19. 19. Common Networking Hurdles • Don’t want to talk with strangers • Waiting to be properly introduced • Being pushy, aggressive in conversation • Controlling or dominating the discussion • One-sided (all talk, no listening) • Mr./Ms. Know-it-all / Highly-opinionated / Right • Mangled and mixed messages • Not paying attention, not listening • Body language • Eye contact (lack of, too much), physical contact • Arms, stance, space
  20. 20. Networking Hurdles – I’m introverted • Networking is a long term • Invite people to lunch investment in your career • Go regularly to events • Don’t network just for the you like sake of networking • Analyze your results • Over-attend events until you find a match for • Volunteer (NAAAP, etc) yourself • Be the Early Bird • Find the key nodes in the • Don’t worry, be comfy network • Seek out fellow introverts • Talk about yourself without bragging • Set goals • Join Toastmasters • Follow up http://www.businesspundit.com/how-to-network-for-introverts/
  21. 21. Networking Hurdles – I’m too shy 1. Start small 2. Stop apologizing 3. Tap into your primal instincts 4. The Wisdom of Dale Carnegie Smile - Ask a question - Listen - Business cards - Say the person’s name 5. Be yourself and relax 6. Tap into your passions 7. Ask for introductions 8. Be generous 9. Be prepared 10. Follow up 11. Get over your fear of rejection 12. Take risks 13. Seek professional help www.cio.com “How to Network: 12 Tips for Shy People”
  22. 22. Networking Hurdles – Gender Differences in Communications Men Women • Uses fewer words and has a limit; • Tends to use more verbal & will interrupt written words; won’t interrupt • Tends to criticize others in order • Tends to criticize self in order to to connect connect • Chooses words that describe the • Chooses words that describe the goal of success process to success • Tends to talk about their own • Tends to listen about other’s accomplishments accomplishments • Tends to talk about outcomes of • Tends to talk about family, social groups (sports), trivia, and relationships, memories, and competition emotions • Squints/frowns when listening • Smiles more when listening • Uses more physical space • Uses less physical space • Notices fewer non-verbal cues • Believes non-verbal cues more “Leadership and the Sexes” by Michael Gurian and Barbara Annis
  23. 23. Networking Preparation Tips • Adopt a positive attitude • Focus on the benefit of the event • Plan your self-introduction • Check your business cards – bring plenty! • Prepare your small talk • Remember to make eye contact and smile • Practice your handshake: firm, but not hard
  24. 24. Working the Room • Enter the room with confidence • If necessary, use the buddy system • Seek out others • Make the most of name tags: BIG LETTERS • Use great opening lines • Join conversations that are in progress • Know how to exit from conversations
  25. 25. Conversations – Join • Use OAR: Observe . . . Ask . . . Reveal • Look for smaller groups of about 2-3 people • Look for an “approachable” person in the group • When entering into a conversation with a group: • Show interest in the speaker, but stand slightly away from the group • Ease into the group by demonstrating that you’ve been listening • Initially, it is best to find a point of agreement, or at a minimum acknowledge the speaker • Remember the other person’s name and use it: “Nice to meet you, Joe.” • If you missed it or forgot it, confess, ask the person to repeat his/her name “Excuse me, I’m not sure I got your name…” • Don’t use nicknames unless that is how the individual introduced herself/himself • Make it a point to give your name when you meet someone
  26. 26. Conversations - Engage • Active Listening Skills are critical to successful conversation • People speak 150-200 words per/min but have the capacity to listen at 300 words/min. • Challenge is that people tend to fill that extra capacity with distractions such as: • Eavesdropping on other conversations • Drifting in private thoughts • Thinking of questions to ask • Focus on being present in the moment • Verbalize your listening by asking follow-up questions • Become a “whole body” listener, e.g. facial expressions, head nods • BEWARE: Too much listening and not enough verbalizing may halt a conversation…just as monopolizing a conversation may do…you need to strike the right balance.
  27. 27. Conversations – Keep it going • Ask open-ended questions • Reluctant speakers may respond more easily to questions about career, leisure interests, or family • Avoid long pauses by planning and preparation • Tailor your preparation to the occasion and to the audience with whom you will be speaking • What got you involved in this organization/event? • What has been your most important work experience? • Avoid controversial topics (e.g. stories of questionable taste, gossip, politics, religion, etc.) • Get personal by being personal, but not too personal • Use compliments, but be sincere with them
  28. 28. Conversations – Exiting gracefully • End the conversation with a show of appreciation: • “I really enjoyed talking with you about XYZ.” • “I appreciate your willingness to share your insights about XYZ with me.” • Clearly state the reason you are exiting the conversation and have a clear destination in mind (make sure you don’t look lost) • “I need to go see the exhibits / refresh my drink / to the powder room.” • Allow a “changing of the guard” when a new person joins a conversation with a couple of others in the group • Take your conversation partner along with you to another conversation group • “I’d like to introduce you to an associate of mine. Let’s see if she’s around.” • “Let’s circulate. I promised myself I’d meet several new people.”
  29. 29. Conversations – Ensuring lasting connections • Don’t hesitate to ask for business or referrals as you exit a conversation • “Do you know of a good contact for XYZ?” • “Can you suggest anyone with whom I could speak about XYZ?” • Exchange Business Cards • Exchanging business cards follows a conversation…not preceding • Best when there is a stated reason (e.g., to schedule a meeting or to provide some requested information) • Always look at the card before putting it away • After the Event • Follow up on action items • Call someone you met • Send a “Thank You” note if appropriate
  30. 30. How do you make an IMPACT at a live networking event? • Plan ahead! Know what you • Initiate discussions with open want out of the event and who ended questions. Good things you want to meet. do not come to those who wait. • Prepare a short self- introduction showing • Work the room. One and two ties to the event. layers above you are more important than the top leader. • Find common interests • Exchange contact info. Jot • Know the internal and external notes on business cards. hot topics. • Be memorable, remember • Be positive and energized or something the game is over. • Give a little, get a little
  31. 31. Ready, Set…Network! • Think about 1-2 things you want to try • Count off by X • Group by your team number • You’ll have as much time as you’d like to introduce yourself to the people in your group • Learn at least 1 common interest and 1 interesting fact about each person, and their profession/work/job • Practice firm handshake • Once done, move onto another group • Continue until time is up
  32. 32. Ready, Set…Network! De-brief • Did you try your new technique? How did it feel? • What do you remember about the people you met? Do you remember the discussion? • Anyone volunteer to share or help someone after this day? Anyone directly benefit from the discussion? • Make new friends? Make new professional acquaintances that may be useful to you?
  33. 33. Maintaining the Relationships • Follow up, follow up, follow up! • Use multiple communication channels • Build and maintain your database • Allocate time (4 hours/month), 2-4 times/year • Use your network for advice and coaching • Be prepared to give and take help • If you find something beneficial for someone, freely give it to her/him
  34. 34. Summary • Networking is a critical skill for your career that you will use often. • Networking isn’t easy if you’re not comfortable with it, but it does get easier with practice – it is a learned skill. • Networking can be fun! • Networking is a valuable asset and tool that benefits you when you give & receive.
  35. 35. Acknowledgements • Many thanks to Parita Patel for this material from GE, used as a starting basis for this presentation. • Much appreciation to Richelle Mon for asking me to present this material to you. • My sincere thanks to Parita Patel and Rose Olea for leading the efforts in NAAAP-Chicago in developing women for leadership roles. • Thank you to all of the NAAAP volunteers who brought this event and this workshop to you!

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