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2014 U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys 
ANNUAL REPORT 
INSTALLATION MANAGEMENT COMMAND - PACIFIC
COMMANDER’S STATEMENT 
TRANSFORMATION UPDATE 
THE CHALLENGES AHEAD 
FISCAL YEAR 2014 HIGHLIGHTS 
Contents 
03 
04 
08 
14
In this issue of the U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys Annual Report, we will review many of the significant projects and accom...
4 million 
29+ million 
Our mission is to deliver and integrate base support to enable readiness for a self-reliant and gl...
5 
readiness, efficiency, and further enhance its part-nership 
with local communities. The consolidation of 
U.S. forces ...
Newly constructed facilities on Camp Humphreys include Army Family Housing towers (back left), a School Aged Services Cent...
7 
Yongsan Relocation Plan (YRP) and 
Land Partnership Plan (LPP) Progress Report 
Korea Program Relocation Office (KPRO) ...
8 
THE CHALLENGES AHEAD 
As Camp Humphreys continues on its 
path to become the largest U.S. Army 
installation in South K...
9 
In March 2013, USAG-H opened three new Army Family Housing towers on Camp Humphreys, featuring 210 housing units and an...
10 
Allowance fair market value rates are not keeping 
pace with changes in the local real estate market. 
To resolve this...
11 
AIRCRAFT PARKING SPACE SHORTFALL 
Camp Humphreys currently has one rotational At-tack 
Reconnaissance Squadron station...
SOLDIER SUPPORT AREA CONSTRUCTION SITE: The many construction cranes and cement truck booms depicted in this photo demonst...
13 
relies on swing space facilities to move relocating 
units and organizations into temporary locations 
while construct...
MIDDLE/HIGH SCHOOL GRAND OPENING: 
In addition to modern and well-appointed 
classrooms, science labs, and digital art and...
15 
Aaron Tippin performs a concert as part of the Humphreys Oktoberfest celebration, Oct. 26, 2013. Humphreys hosts the E...
16 
AIRFIELD RESCUE AND FIRE STATION: USAG Humphreys opened two new fire stations, consisting of a central station and one...
17 
Army Birthday 5K Fun Run, June 14, 2014. Emergency response drill, June 26, 2014. 
Let Freedom Ring Festival, July 4, ...
Humphreys Child Development Center earns re-accreditation, July, 2014. 
Youth Center Disc Golf excursion, July 15, 2014. 
...
19 
GROUND BREAKING FOR NEW ‘DOWNTOWN’ AREA CONDUCTED AT HUMPHREYS: Ground was broken for the new “downtown” area, featuri...
20 
This is an authorized publication for members of U.S. Army Garrison 
Humphreys, Installation Management Command - Paci...
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2014 Annual Report: U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys

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In this issue of the U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys Annual Report, we will review many of the significant projects and accomplishments achieved over the course of fiscal year 2014. We will also provide an update on progress being made in support of U.S. Forces Korea Transformation & Restationing efforts and offer an assessment on some of the key challenges we are going to face in the coming years.

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2014 Annual Report: U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys

  1. 1. 2014 U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys ANNUAL REPORT INSTALLATION MANAGEMENT COMMAND - PACIFIC
  2. 2. COMMANDER’S STATEMENT TRANSFORMATION UPDATE THE CHALLENGES AHEAD FISCAL YEAR 2014 HIGHLIGHTS Contents 03 04 08 14
  3. 3. In this issue of the U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys Annual Report, we will review many of the significant projects and accomplishments achieved over the course of fiscal year 2014. We will also provide an update on progress being made in support of U.S. Forces Korea Transformation & Restationing efforts and offer an assessment on some of the key challenges we are going to face in the coming years. But first, I want to congratulate the USAG-H Installation Management Team for their solid execution of the countless tasks related to the USFK Transformation & Restationing program, while at the same time managing Garrison day-to-day operations throughout the year. In normal times, your accomplishments would be impressive. But, what you are undertaking here is far from normal — it is exceptional. I say exceptional for three reasons. First, we are currently home to one of the largest construction and transformation projects in the U.S. Department of Defense’s history. Second, we operate the U.S. Army’s most active overseas airfield and our mission to provide airfield support has expanded significantly over the past year with the integration of rotational forces in our formations. Third, with all that is going on around us, you continue to succeed with our core mission to provide Army-standard installation management support to our community and the tenant units stationed here. Taken alone, any one of these single accomplishments is significant. Together they are extraordinary. I would also like to thank our partners, without whom our success would not be possible. The strength of our relationships between all of the organizations, units and agencies involved in USFK Transformation & Restationing is what makes forward progress possible and allows us to overcome the challenges related to such a complex initiative. As is normal with any major program of this size, complexity and within a dynamic security environment, various conditions impact our projected timelines. And yet, we continue to move forward with our partners at a prudent and adequate pace. As you will see in the pages to follow, much of the land development and underground infrastructure work is complete and our new skyline is beginning to take shape as we fully transition into the vertical construction phase. In fact, over the past 12 months, we successfully opened two new fire stations, a base operations facility, as well as elementary and middle/high school campuses containing 215 classrooms, sports fields and multiple playgrounds. This year, we also broke ground on several mission and community support facilities, including the future 2nd Infantry Division Headquarters complex and a “downtown” area, designed to offer a wide array of shopping, entertainment, recreation and religious support services. Finally, I want to thank the host-nation communities surrounding our installation. For more than 60 years, the ROK-U.S. Alliance has continuously met the challenges of the dynamic security environment in Northeast Asia. Here at Camp Humphreys, our relationships with Korean civic, business and governmental organizations remain strong and will continue to play an important role in the overall success of that Alliance, as we work together to ensure a bright future and build on the success of our mutually beneficial relationships. DARIN S, CONKRIGHT COL, SF COMMANDING From the Commander To our partners, allies and stakeholders
  4. 4. 4 million 29+ million Our mission is to deliver and integrate base support to enable readiness for a self-reliant and globally responsive all volunteer Army. Located in the city of Pyeongtaek, South Korea, United States Army Garrison Humphreys (USAG-H) is the headquarters element responsible for providing installation management support for the Camp Humphreys Military Community and the personnel and facilities located within the geographical boundary designated as Area III. Home to the Army’s most active overseas airfield and one of the largest construction and transformation sites in the U.S. Department of Defense’s history, Camp Humphreys is poised to become the largest enduring U.S. installation in South Korea. To that end, the Garrison is growing rapidly in the coming years, with an investment of $10.7 billion in construction, which will ultimately transform it into one of the most modern and well equipped Army installations in the world. To put this in perspective, the Garrison is set to increase in total acreage by 192% and will see a 725% increase in the total number of installation facilities in the coming years. At the same time, the installation population is expected to grow by 440%. $10.7 billion Approximately $10.7 billion worth of construction is, and will be, taking place at Camp Humphreys in support of USFK transformation and restationing efforts. While leading and managing a transformation project of this scale, the Garrison is working hard to ensure the combat readiness of the tenant units stationed here, as well as provide adequate quality of life programs and services for the Soldiers, Families, and civilians living and working in the Camp Humphreys Military Community. TRANSFORMATION & RESTATIONING USFK is in the process of repositioning and consolidating into two enduring hubs south of Seoul, near the cities of Pyeongtaek and Daegu. By moving into these locations, USFK will improve The original square footage of facility space at Camp Humphreys was 4 million. Once construction is complete, this volume will increase to 29+ million square feet. Mission Focused SQUARE FOOTAGE 4
  5. 5. 5 readiness, efficiency, and further enhance its part-nership with local communities. The consolidation of U.S. forces in Korea will support U.S. and South Ko-rean national interests, including a strong combined defense and credible deterrence. The USFK transformation program is accomplishing the relocation through two major plans: the Yongsan Relocation Plan (YRP) and the Land Partnership Plan (LPP). The Republic of Korea Government (ROKG) funds the YRP agreement to relocate the Head-quarters of USFK and the United Nations Command primarily to Camp Humphreys. The LPP agreement primarily consolidates forces from north of Seoul to Camp Humphreys, while still providing access to northern training areas and ranges. USFK will thus reduce its theater footprint, with all non-enduring sites returning to the ROKG. USFK manages the $10.7 billion transformation pro-gram already well underway at Camp Humphreys, with more than $1 billion in current construction. In total, there are 121 projects in the works, which will result in the construction of 655 new facilities. The transformation efforts underway at Camp Hum-phreys triple its size from 1,210 to 3,538 acres, with the garrison population growing from approximately 10,000 to 36,000 military, civilian, and Family mem-bers. Main construction projects include unit head-quarters, vehicle maintenance facilities, hangars, Soldier quarters, Family housing, medical facilities, a military communications complex, a downtown shopping area, schools, child development centers, fitness centers, and numerous other facilities. At end-state, Camp Humphreys will be one of the largest Army installations in the region. 2012 CAMP HUMPHREYS COMMUNITY POPULATION GROWTH BY YEAR (2012-2017) 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 10,038 11,187 13,550 14,057 16,382 36,237 SOURCE: RTO/PAOI-T Population Analysis, June 2014 The Commander of 4th Attack Reconnaissance Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, Lt. Col. Brian Watkins, and the senior enlisted advisor to the commander, Command Sgt. Maj. Stanley Williams, uncase their unit’s colors Oct. 18, 2013 following their arrival as a rotational force at Camp Hum-phreys. The squadron also brought along with it 30 OH-58D Kiowa Warrior helicopters. US Army photo by Staff Sgt. Aaron P. Duncan, 2nd CAB PAO FAMILY HOUSING AND SUPPORT STRUCTURES: In FY 14, two Department of Defense Dependant School campuses opened on Camp Humphreys, making available 215 classrooms, sports fields and multiple playgrounds. Included in this project was an elementary school designed to accommodate approximately 875 students (right). Construction on a Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation School Age Services facility (left) nears completion and will provide occupants of newly constructed Army Family Housing Towers (back) easy access to programs designed to promote physical, social, emotional, aesthetic, and intellectual development. U.S. Army photo by Edward N. Johnson
  6. 6. Newly constructed facilities on Camp Humphreys include Army Family Housing towers (back left), a School Aged Services Center (foreground) and the Humphreys Central Elementary School campus (right). One of several single Soldier barracks towers currently occupied or under construction on Camp Humphreys. Railhead bridge crossing Ansoeng River north of Camp Humphreys under construction to support mobilization, training and sustainment operations. View of vehicle maintenance facilities and barracks complex construction sites, as seen from the northern banks of Anseong River. U.S. Army photos by Edward N. Johnson Humphreys Middle School. Humphreys Elementary School #2. Hospital, dental clinic and ambulatory care center.
  7. 7. 7 Yongsan Relocation Plan (YRP) and Land Partnership Plan (LPP) Progress Report Korea Program Relocation Office (KPRO) Programmed Executed Total YPR/LPP percentage of execution, based on programmed amounts, including land acquisition costs. SOURCE: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Far East District, September, 2014. KORCOM Headquarters % Executed KORCOM Operations Center % Executed Hospital % Executed Projects Completed Real Property Turned Over Land, Development, Utilities & Infrastructure (LDUI) % Executed Total Program % Executed YRP % Executed LPP % Executed 50% 50% 46% 54% 62% 38% 128 23 632 24 28% 72% 86% 14% 94% 6% 68% 32%
  8. 8. 8 THE CHALLENGES AHEAD As Camp Humphreys continues on its path to become the largest U.S. Army installation in South Korea, it should come as no surprise to our partners, community members, the Garrison workforce and host-nation populations surrounding the installation, that we will face several challenges in the years to come. While these challenges are certainly not insurmountable, they will require us to work together to ease the growing pains associated with such a large project, while also taking prudent measures to ensure milestones continue to be met at an adequate pace. HOUSING DEFICIT Upon completion of USFK Transforma-tion and Restationing efforts, Camp Humphreys will face a deficit of 425 on-post Army Family Housing units. This number is based on USFK’s requirement that 40% of command sponsored Fami-lies reside in on-post quarters. According to recent analysis, there will also be an approximate deficit of 2,200 adequate off-post housing units, located within a 30 minute commute of the installation. In March of 2014, the Assistant Sec-retary of the Army for Installations, Energy & Environment, hosted a hous-ing industry forum to promote off-post housing development in the vicinity of Camp Humphreys. Those in attendance expressed interest in further housing development investment in the area. However, many developers and financi-ers remain hesitant to invest in off-post housing, without a written agreement assuring adequate occupancy levels are achieved to support a profitable busi-ness model. Additionally, with the anticipated mod-ernization and growth of off-post com-munities in the area, comes an increase in local property values. As a result, there is concern that Overseas Housing While 683 Army Family Housing units currently exist or are pro-grammed for construction, there remains a 425 unit deficit to meet the requirement to house 40% of command sponsored Families in on-post quarters. ARMY FAMILY HOUSING UNIT DEFICIT PROJECTION 683 1108 ACTUAL REQUIRED “USFK’s priority is to house about 1,100 Families on-post. Many of the remaining personnel and Families need rental housing off-post.” Katherine Hammack, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment 2014 Housing Development Industry Forum Presentation
  9. 9. 9 In March 2013, USAG-H opened three new Army Family Housing towers on Camp Humphreys, featuring 210 housing units and an underground parking garage. Construction on an additional three towers, housing 216 units, is set to begin in FY 15. U.S. Army photo by Edward N. Johnson CAMP HUMPHREYS ON-POST FAMILY HOUSING CAPACITY ON-POST HOUSING REQUIREMENTS 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 Camp Humphreys On-post Housing Capacity 358 352 467 683 683 683 683 683 Command Sponsorship Requirement 902 924 1055 2768 2768 2768 2768 2768 40% On-post Family Housing Requirement 361 370 422 1108 1108 1008 1108 1108 On-post Family Housing Unit Shortfall -3 -18 + 45 -4 25 - 425 - 425 - 425 - 425 1100 900 700 500 300 100 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 Available on-post housing Required on-post housing
  10. 10. 10 Allowance fair market value rates are not keeping pace with changes in the local real estate market. To resolve this challenge, the Garrison is working to establish a Focused Community Housing Program to encourage private sector housing solutions in the vicinity of Camp Humphreys. COMMUNITY DISRUPTION MITIGATION Of concern to Garrison officials, are the day-to-day challenges faced by the current Camp Humphreys Military Community population, resulting from a wide variety of transformation-related service and traffic disruptions. For example, vehicle and pedestrian traffic is routine-ly disrupted due to road detours and gate closures. Additionally, as service providers move to end state or temporary swing space locations, community members are often required to travel greater dis-tances to receive service and support. In some cases, recreation, dining and community support facilities are also required to reduce services or temporarily shut down operations until swing space or end state facilities are made available. While necessary, Garrison officials acknowledge the impact transformation growing pains will have on the community and have taken steps to mitigate, to the greatest extent possible, service, traffic and other community disruptions. For example, effectively communicating installation construction updates, road closures, service provider moves, and other construction-related information is vital in keeping the community informed, aware of changes on the horizon and fostering a ready and resilient environment for those residing here. One way this is accomplished is by regularly hosting town hall meetings and community update brief-ings. The Garrison Command Group also spends a significant amount of time at newcomer briefings and other public forums interacting with members of the community, working to explain the reasoning behind construction-related decisions and manag-ing expectations. Transformation updates are also distributed via a robust social media communica-tions program. ROAD CLOSURES: Frequent road closures required for the installation of underground infrastructure (above) often result in traffic detours, gate closures, delays and congestion across the instal-lation. U.S. Army photo by Edward N. Johnson Lt. Gen. Bernard S. Champoux, Eighth Army commanding general, answers questions during a Transformation Town Hall Meeting, Aug. 27, 2014. Among the subjects discussed were ongoing construction projects and steps being taken to mitigate their impact on the Camp Humphreys Military Community. U.S. Army photo by Steven Hoover
  11. 11. 11 AIRCRAFT PARKING SPACE SHORTFALL Camp Humphreys currently has one rotational At-tack Reconnaissance Squadron stationed here on a nine month deployment rotation cycle. While the Garrison has the ability to support hous-ing, vehicle maintenance, headquarters space, hangers and parking requirements for the rotational OH-58 ARS platform, it is anticipated AH-64 helicop-ters will eventually replace the OH-58 airframes, at a rotation date to be determined in the future. Should that occur, current and programmed parking space at the Desiderio Army Airfield (A-511) will fall short of the spaces necessary to meet the additional space required to support an AH-64 battalion. Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Raymond T. Odierno tours the inside of an AH-64 Apache helicopter, during his visit to 4th Attack Reconnaissance Squadron, 6th Calvary Regiment, 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Hangar on Camp Humphreys, South Korea, Feb. 24, 2014. The CSA received a tour of various aviation equipment and aircraft used by 4-6 ARS Soldiers during his visit to Camp Humphreys. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Nicole Hall. LEFT: A 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade OH-58D Kiowa, based out of Camp Humphreys, South Korea, participates in a Republic of Korea Army rotary aircraft Top Heligun (Gun) competition at Biseung Range, Oct. 6, 2014. Camp Humphreys is home to the Army’s most active overseas airfield. Tenant and rotational aviation units operating here are comprised of a multitude of airframes, to include OH-58D (Rotational), UH-60L, AH-64D, CH-47F, RC-12, and DHC-7. U.S. Army photo by 2CAB PAO.
  12. 12. SOLDIER SUPPORT AREA CONSTRUCTION SITE: The many construction cranes and cement truck booms depicted in this photo demonstrate examples of mobile obstructions impacting imaginary surfaces surrounding Desiderio Army Airfield. U.S. Army photo by Edward N. Johnson 12 IMAGINARY SURFACES Airfield design involves the creation of imaginary surfaces, which must have no obstructions, to ensure aircraft can safely arrive and depart the airfield. Imaginary surfaces are three-dimensional areas described as distances from runways and as heights above elevation. Areas are more restrictive close to the runway and become less restrictive depending on distance and direction from the runway. Due to ongoing construction initiatives involving the temporary placement and movement of construc-tion cranes, as well as the introduction of new power lines, communications towers and other structures, the imaginary surfaces surrounding Desiderio Army Airfield will remain in flux through the completion of ongoing construction initiatives. Negative weather conditions may also impact con-struction activities or cause work stoppages, in the event pilots are required to transition from visual to instrument flight rules. The Camp Humphreys airfield manager works with 8th U.S. Army, the Federal Aviation Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and on-site con-struction companies to either relocate construction equipment or modify flight procedures, as needed, to ensure a safe and efficient use of the navigable airspace is maintained. Additionally, the airfield man-ager works with tenant aviation units and air traffic control managers to ensure they receive constant updates related to changes in imaginary horizontal, conical, transitional and approach surfaces. SWING SPACE & END STATE MOVES One of the many logistical challenges faced when undertaking a construction, relocation and con-solidation project like the one currently underway at Camp Humphreys, is managing “swing space” requirements from project beginning to end. In general, swing space is defined as space used on an interim basis or occupied during a construction or renovation project. In some cases, the Garrison
  13. 13. 13 relies on swing space facilities to move relocating units and organizations into temporary locations while construction or renovations are completed on permanent facilities. Interim swing space moves may also be required to accommodate for the lag between the destruction of an existing facility and the construction of perma-nent space. Additionally, swing space facilities may be required because some parts of the organization are moving in phases, in order to maintain continuity of operations during the relocation process. To mitigate swing space challenges, the Garrison’s Directorate of Public Works took steps early in the planning phase to minimize the need for swing space moves and reduce their impact on those sta-tioned here. Despite those efforts, numerous moves were, and will continue to be, required. Of course, swing space moves are not just about space. They also involve the disruptions in service as personnel, vehicles, equipment and supplies are moved from current to interim locations, and then on to permanent facilities. In some cases, organiza-tions are required to make more than one swing space move, due to the pace and timing of construc-tion across the Garrison. Lack of parking at swing space facilities is also a challenge, as the available parking space at interim facilities was often not originally designed to meet the needs of transient residents or their customers. In 2014, approximately 30 swing space moves took place on Camp Humphreys and an additional 14 moves are scheduled to occur in FY 15. The number of swing space moves is on track to drop significantly in the next 18 months and DPW will then transition their focus to end state moves in FY 16 and beyond. MENTAL TRANSFORMATION With progress comes change. As Camp Humphreys physically transforms and roads, housing areas, schools, work sites and support structures take shape, it’s important for those stationed here, now and in the future, to remain flexible and be prepared to adapt to a new way of thinking when it comes to serving a tour of duty in South Korea. With that in mind, Garrison officials are constantly reassessing processes, procedures and mission sup-port requirements to ensure appropriate measures are taken to meet the needs of a rapidly changing community. To achieve success, it is also imperative to understand the impact transformation is having, and will continue to have, on geographic, psycho-graphic and demographic factors related to the restationing process. From training, transportation, security, plans and operations, to the delivery of Soldier and Family sup-port services, leaders and managers at all levels must be focusing on the critical success factors required to ensure this mental transformation process begins now instead of once the major unit movements begin. Similarly, through initiatives like the ROK-US Friend-ship Council, Korea Housing Forum and other community relations activities, Garrison officials are working closely with host-nation business, civic, and governmental leaders to assist them in taking full advantage of the opportunities transformation has to offer — both on and off-post. At the same time, prudent steps are being taken to ensure the Gar-rison’s host-nation partners understand the impact Camp Humphreys’ changing demographics will have on off-post housing, shopping, dining, cultural and entertainment needs. CAMP HUMPHREYS SENIOR NCO E-7-E9 FIELD GRADE OFFICER 04-06 FLAG OFFICER 07-010 FY 2014 354 68 1 FY 2015 366 75 1 FY 2016 801 204 1 FY 2017 1,317 723 10 FY 2016 1,398 736 11 Source: Population Analysis Area III RTO, July 3, 2014 U.S. MILITARY DEMOGRAPHICS ANALYSIS
  14. 14. MIDDLE/HIGH SCHOOL GRAND OPENING: In addition to modern and well-appointed classrooms, science labs, and digital art and music rooms, the three-story middle/high school (above) features a cutting-edge digital video production studio, perform-ing arts auditorium, rooftop garden for planned culinary arts courses, and an indoor regulation marksmanship range for the JROTC program. The school officially opened Jan. 8, 2014. The middle/high school configuration is temporary, as a dedicated middle school is also currently under construction. Once complete, all middle school students will move to the new middle school and the current high school will revert to grades 9-12. Additional elementary schools are also scheduled to open in the coming years, which will provide an end-state enrolment capacity sufficient to support community growth. Photos by U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys Public Affairs Office and the Family and MWR Marketing Department USAG Humphreys Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Operations opened a new airfield Base Operations facility (above) in October, 2013. 14 The following pages help tell the story of U.S. Army Garrison Hum-phreys as they highlight the many events and accomplishments the Garrison, along with its partners, achieved in fiscal year 2014. They also serve as a reminder of the Command’s vision to remain in-novative professionals, committed to effectively delivering extraor-dinary services and facilities to our premier Army. Fiscal Year 2014 Highlights
  15. 15. 15 Aaron Tippin performs a concert as part of the Humphreys Oktoberfest celebration, Oct. 26, 2013. Humphreys hosts the ESPN Armed Forces Classic, collegiate-level basketball game, Nov. 9, 2013. USAG Humphreys HHC Soldiers take part in a local Army 10 Miler Shadow Run, Oct. 20, 2013.
  16. 16. 16 AIRFIELD RESCUE AND FIRE STATION: USAG Humphreys opened two new fire stations, consisting of a central station and one satellite station, in December 2013. The central fire station (above) serves as a combined airport rescue fire fighting and structural fire station, with a 911 Emergency Korea-wide Dispatch Center. This station has an apparatus room to house fire protection vehicles and a vehicle wash and maintenance bay. The station is also equipped with disinfecting facilities for emergency medical equipment and has living quarters for 24 fire fighters. Other features included are; laundry storage, kitchen, alarm, communication center, emergency operations center, administrative offices and training facilities. Youth Center TV cast and crew produce first episode of their monthly YCTV show. Feb. 1, 2014. Army Chief of Staff visit, Feb. 24, 2014. Humphreys Holiday Bazaar, Dec. 6-8, 2013. 2nd Infantry Division Headquarters Facility Groundbreaking Ceremony, April 7, 2014.
  17. 17. 17 Army Birthday 5K Fun Run, June 14, 2014. Emergency response drill, June 26, 2014. Let Freedom Ring Festival, July 4, 2014. Earth Day Eggstravaganza Celebration, April 19, 2014. Humphreys High School Inaugural Commencement Celebration, June 4, 2014. KATUSA/U.S. Friendship Week, April 14, 2014. Full Scale Exercise, May 12-16, 2014. Aerial view of one of multiple Soldier barracks complex construction sites, July 16, 2014.
  18. 18. Humphreys Child Development Center earns re-accreditation, July, 2014. Youth Center Disc Golf excursion, July 15, 2014. Korean-American Joint Summer Camp, July 22, 2014. Humphreys Community Youth Sports Clinic, July 16, 2014. IMCOM COMMANDING GENERAL TOURS HUMPHREYS: Col. Darin S. Conkright, commander of U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys and Area III, points out recently-opened DoDEA school campuses and key construction projects to Lt. Gen. David D. Halverson, commander of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command and Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, along with Command Sgt. Maj. Jeffrey S. Hartless, IMCOM command sergeant major (left) and Command Sgt. Maj. Matthew D. McCoy, U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys command sergeant major (right), July 25, 2014.
  19. 19. 19 GROUND BREAKING FOR NEW ‘DOWNTOWN’ AREA CONDUCTED AT HUMPHREYS: Ground was broken for the new “downtown” area, featuring a new Exchange, commissary and bowling center among other facilities, at Camp Humphreys, South Korea, Aug. 11, 2014. The project will also see the construction of an auditorium, chapel Family life center, an arts & crafts center, recreation center, community plaza and parking. When completed, these facilities will provide retail shopping, grocery, entertainment, recreation and religious services. Humphreys Information Fair, Sept. 18, 2014. Boys & Girls Clubs of America National Day for Children, Sept. 27, 2014. Seussical Junior the Musical performance, July 25, 2014. Women’s Equality Observance, Aug. 25, 2014.
  20. 20. 20 This is an authorized publication for members of U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, Installation Management Command - Pacific Region. Contents of this publication are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, Department of the Army, or Instal-lation Management Command. This publication is published annually by Headquarters, U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, Public Affairs Office, Unit #15228, APO AP 96271-5228.

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