Presentation by William Trent

636 views

Published on

Presentation by William Trent given during the March 2013 Looking Back, Moving Forward conference in Richmond, Virginia, hosted by University of Richmond and Virginia Commonwealth University.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
636
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
142
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The decisions constructing the distribution of high quality teachers has consequences for student performance and for what we are likely to find when we assess peer effects.
  • Taking higher level courses from higher quality teachers matters.
  • Presentation by William Trent

    1. 1. “Looking Back, Moving Forward”a conference on race, class, opportunity and school boundaries in the Richmond regionWilliam TrentThe University of IllinoisMarch 14, 2013
    2. 2. Main PointsSegregation matters. There are serious and harmful educationalconsequences.Resegregation is reestablishing segregation but in a moreintense manner.Desegregation is necessary but not sufficient to achieve thebenefits of diversity.Integration should never be conflated to mean no more thandesegregation.
    3. 3. Resegregation of our schools is a long term trendThe next few slides present resegregation data forschool districts that were under court order todesegregate. I served as an expert witness in each ofthese districts.
    4. 4. Table 7Percentage of Black Students in 90-100% Minority Schools1990 1995 2000 2005 2010Charlotte-Mecklenburg 2.6 2.6 6.2 31.7 43.9Kansas City * 26.1 54.7 76.3 77.2Prince George’s County 20.0 55.4 68.9 82.7 88.7San Francisco 48.4 55.6 69.2 73.6 65.3St. Louis City * 59.4 55.4 67.3 61.0* No data for Missouri for 1989-1990 school year.
    5. 5. Table 8Percentage of Black Students in 50-100% Minority Schools1990 1995 2000 2005 2010Charlotte-Mecklenburg 38.7 51.0 68.9 84.1 85.4Kansas City * 100.0 96.0 98.4 98.8Prince George’s County 90.7 95.4 99.1 99.9 100.0San Francisco 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 97.9St. Louis City * 98.5 99.4 99.4 97.8* No data for Missouri for 1989-1990 school year.
    6. 6. Table 9Percentage of Latino Students in 90-100% Minority Schools1990 1995 2000 2005 2010Charlotte-Mecklenburg 1.1 .7 7.0 27.4 43.3Kansas City * 9.6 19.7 33.3 31.1Prince George’s County 22.9 52.5 71.2 84.2 88.3San Francisco 55.2 59.1 69.5 76.1 66.7St. Louis City * .0 4.0 14.9 12.0* No data for Missouri for 1989-1990 school year.
    7. 7. Table 10Percentage of Latino Students in 50-100% Minority Schools1990 1995 2000 2005 2010Charlotte-Mecklenburg 41.1 53.9 76.9 82.0 83.8Kansas City * 100.0 95.2 93.3 99.5Prince George’s County 88.8 96.7 99.1 99.9 100.0San Francisco 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.2St. Louis City * 93.9 98.6 92.8 90.7* No data for Missouri for 1989-1990 school year.
    8. 8. Percentage of Black Students in 50-100%Minority Schools2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010ChesterfieldCounty33.0% 22.0% 22.6% 25.6% 26.4% 26.8% 25.9% 25.1% 23.8% 23.8%HenricoCounty53.7% 53.4% 72.8% 70.7% 72.2% 73.1% 73.2% 73.1% 72.6% 83.2%RichmondPublic100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
    9. 9. Percentage of Latino Students in 50-100%Minority Schools2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010ChesterfieldCounty36.4% 31.6% 30.0% 36.5% 36.6% 35.3% 36.8% 35.3% 29.9% 27.6%HenricoCounty10.2% 12.9% 15.9% 15.9% 17.1% 21.6% 19.4% 19.6% 20.4% 38.1%RichmondPublic100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
    10. 10. Why do we care about Resegregation in education?Resegregation is a threat to long persisting aspirations regarding equality ofeducational opportunity:A continuing concern to secure and protect the constitutional and human rights ofall citizens.A continuing concern to achieve improved learning outcomes and academicachievement.A continuing concern to secure improved intergroup relations.A continuing concern to secure improved long-term benefits in social mobility,work and income.A continuing concern to secure social justice and democracy.
    11. 11. School desegregation at its core is aboutaccess to high quality educationalresources. Arguably that means access toa rich curriculum and to excellentteachers. The data suggests we are a longways away from accomplishing that goal.
    12. 12. Honors and AP Courses by High SchoolTable 5. Distribution of Honors and AP Courses by High School, School Years 1996-2000, SFUSDHighSchool1996 1997 1998 1999 2000HonorsCoursesAPCoursesSchool %Black orLatinoHonorsCoursesAPCoursesSchool %Black orLatinoHonorsCoursesAPCoursesSchool %Black orLatinoHonorsCoursesAPCoursesSchool %Black orLatinoHonorsCoursesAPCoursesSchool %Black orLatinoBalboa 5 1 50.56 0 0 48.37 7 2 46.15 4 2 46.51 6 3 48.55Burton 13 7 44.94 15 7 48.28 12 5 49.28 13 6 46.96 13 5 46.63Downtown 0 0 79.05 0 0 77.83 0 0 77.00 0 0 72.77 0 0 72.77Galileo 14 4 23.51 13 6 25.15 12 5 24.36 16 9 23.75 14 8 22.79Gateway . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 30.10 0 0 39.46Independence 0 0 45.97 0 0 49.59 0 0 49.86 0 0 47.00 0 0 49.40InternationalStudiesAcademy 4 3 47.40 3 2 46.28 4 4 45.60 8 4 49.48 6 3 53.85Leadership . 0 0 . 0 0 34.15 0 0 45.60 0 0 49.43Life LearningAcademy . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 77.78 0 0 72.73Lincoln 14 5 16.90 12 5 15.48 13 6 13.96 13 6 11.04 13 9 11.41Lowell 16 21 14.05 18 21 15.04 16 22 14.62 17 24 14.93 16 24 13.18Marshall 0 0 40.07 0 0 44.95 5 9 40.87 6 6 43.84 5 9 44.95McAteer 8 3 53.47 8 6 54.14 10 6 51.39 9 6 53.16 9 5 52.86Mission 4 3 52.27 3 2 54.99 2 1 57.03 8 2 58.37 7 6 61.16Newcomer 0 0 35.15 0 0 27.03 0 0 9.20 0 0 31.22 0 0 36.61OConnell 0 0 56.90 1 0 54.84 0 0 56.83 0 0 56.56 1 0 58.62School of theArts 3 4 26.09 3 5 25.55 3 6 25.69 3 4 26.75 2 5 28.11Twain 0 0 44.30 0 0 40.54 0 0 36.65 0 0 30.22 0 0 29.15Wallenberg 6 10 28.32 6 10 31.76 4 8 33.87 4 8 32.84 4 6 30.70Washington 16 10 15.31 16 12 14.29 18 13 14.81 17 11 12.31 14 12 12.01Wells 0 0 61.42 0 0 57.55 0 0 63.16 0 0 68.20 0 0 67.32
    13. 13. Access to AP courses by Race and Ethnicity. Detroit Metro Area 1995-1998Table 4. AP Courses Offered By Public High Schools in the Detroit MetroAreaNumberof APCoursesOfferedMaximum1CFactorPointsPossibleUnderSCUGAGuidelinesNumberof HighSchoolsRacial Percentage Distribution of Students inSchools by AP Courses Offered SY95-98Senior Application Rateto U of M, SY 95-98Black AsianAmericanIndians Hispanic White Black Hispanic WhiteNone -1 24 38 8 11 29 4 2.16 3.89 2.281 0 14 20 3 9 13 6 2.86 6.19 2.832-3 1 25 13 10 25 11 14 3.67 7.05 2.164-5 2 29 18 14 27 16 22 7.53 7.89 3.326-7 3 13 2 4 9 8 12 1.89 3.90 2.158-19 4 42 9 61 19 22 41 7.75 22.26 9.37Total N 147 186,915 14,646 5,040 11,499 495,006Information on AP Courses from Detroit Free Press1. The documentation for the C Factor indicates that a “-1”can be awarded for some course-taking patterns. Inactuality, there is some ambiguity as to the extent to whichsuch a score is used .1
    14. 14. 2007 Sociology of Education Association Annual Meeting
    15. 15. 2007 Sociology of Education Association Annual Meeting
    16. 16. 2007 Sociology of Education Association Annual Meeting
    17. 17. The proper education of any people includes sympathetictouch between teacher and pupil; knowledge on the part ofthe teacher, not simply of the individual taught, but of hissurroundings and background, and the history of his classand group; such contact between pupils, and betweenteacher and pupil, on the basis of perfect social equality, aswill increase this sympathy and knowledge; facilities foreducation in equipment and housing, and the promotion ofsuch extracurricular activities as will tend to induct the childinto life.”W.E.B. DuBois

    ×