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Flipping the Classroom
Dr Sharon Gedye
Educational Development
By the end of this session
you will have:
• Identified what flipping looks like
• Expressed the benefits of flipping for s...
What is flipping?
What is Flipping?
• Homework is done first
• Sessions concentrate on personalising learning
and making it more active (var...
Flipping and DigiThings
• Blogs
• Powerpoint
• Mindmaps
• Collaborative presentation
(Prezi and Emaze)
• Curation tools (e...
Benefits and Challenges
Benefits/Problems
Benefits
• Helps students structure learning
• Fosters independence – life-long learners
• Pedagogic rat...
Benefits/Problems
Benefits
• Facilitates students individual pace by extension
activities and ability to revisit difficult...
Benefits/Problems
Problems
• Lack of skills / experience to implement
• Cost (time / money)?
• Student resistence
• Poor d...
Break
• http://www.youtube.co
m/watch?v=tn1DLFnb
GOo
Interesting questions
• Is it appropriate to flip? Can all
sessions be flipped?
• Don’t just go online: If I wanted an
onl...
How might you use digital technology
in a flipped classroom framework?
• How might we
design/support the pre-
session work...
What might good practice
look like?
The Flipped Class: What Does a Good One Look Like? by Brian
Bennett, Jason Kern, April Gudenrath and Philip McIntosh
http:...
Plan to Flip
• What module / part of a module
might you flip?
• What will you need to create?
What can you re-purpose?
• W...
CPD
Teaching approaches
• PBL
• Large group teaching techniques
• Peer assisted learning
• Case-based learning
TEL
• Power...
By the end of this session
you will have:
• Identified what flipping looks like
• Expressed the benefits of flipping for s...
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Flipping the Classroom

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Presentation from a workshop exploring 'flipping the classroom'. This was the final 'thing' in 'DigiThings', an online CPD course, which invited participants to try out a range of presentation tools.

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Flipping the Classroom

  1. 1. Flipping the Classroom Dr Sharon Gedye Educational Development
  2. 2. By the end of this session you will have: • Identified what flipping looks like • Expressed the benefits of flipping for student learning • Critiqued flipping practice – what is good practice? Where are the problem areas? • Considered how the various DigiThings may fit into a flipped classroom framework • Developed some initial ideas as to where and how they might flip their teaching
  3. 3. What is flipping?
  4. 4. What is Flipping? • Homework is done first • Sessions concentrate on personalising learning and making it more active (various formats, problems, discussion etc) • Less time talking at students, more time talking with them (Sage on the stage to guide on the side. Teaching is NOT declaiming) • Harnessing technology to open up flexibility of access • Different exponents display different approaches
  5. 5. Flipping and DigiThings • Blogs • Powerpoint • Mindmaps • Collaborative presentation (Prezi and Emaze) • Curation tools (e.g • Inforgraphics • Graphic presentation Think about how the tools fit into pedagogic design
  6. 6. Benefits and Challenges
  7. 7. Benefits/Problems Benefits • Helps students structure learning • Fosters independence – life-long learners • Pedagogic rationale (constructivist, generation / technology) • Teaching session interactive • Improves interest – Facilitator – Greater interaction and better understanding of students – Student – learning more accessible and fun • Helps you to assess student learning • Student satisfaction?
  8. 8. Benefits/Problems Benefits • Facilitates students individual pace by extension activities and ability to revisit difficult concepts • Depersonalises – reduces embarassment in asking questions • Improves creativity – allows freedom for interpretation • Engages every student with material • Facilitators think about content more • Students more aware of their understanding • Allows sessions to be scaffolded.
  9. 9. Benefits/Problems Problems • Lack of skills / experience to implement • Cost (time / money)? • Student resistence • Poor design / management • Risk students don’t do any prep • Facilitator needs to be flexible in approach to the session • Students that dominate and those that don’t participate • Preparation time (staff and students) • Over use of flipping • Students need time to adjust to new technique • More work for the teacher
  10. 10. Break • http://www.youtube.co m/watch?v=tn1DLFnb GOo
  11. 11. Interesting questions • Is it appropriate to flip? Can all sessions be flipped? • Don’t just go online: If I wanted an online education I wouldn’t have come to university’ – what do you do in class to supplement this? (Bergmann et al list of ‘what flipping is not’ is useful here) • What advice did your reading show in terms of practice? (Mazur provides good insight into issues and developments he encountered)
  12. 12. How might you use digital technology in a flipped classroom framework? • How might we design/support the pre- session work? • How might we design / support in class? • How might we design / support post-class? • What technology might be used to support flipping?
  13. 13. What might good practice look like?
  14. 14. The Flipped Class: What Does a Good One Look Like? by Brian Bennett, Jason Kern, April Gudenrath and Philip McIntosh http://www.thedailyriff.com/articles/the-flipped-class-what-does-a- good-one-look-like-692.php • Discussions led by students, outside content is brought in and expanded. • Discussions typically reach higher orders of critical thinking. • Collaborative work is fluid, students shift between simultaneous discussions depending on needs / interests. • Content is given context - relates to real-world scenarios. • Students challenge one another during class on content. • Student-led tutoring and collaborative learning may form spontaneously. • Students take ownership of the material and use their knowledge to lead one another without prompting from the teacher. • Students ask exploratory questions, freedom to delve beyond core curriculum. • Students are actively engaged in problem solving and critical thinking that reaches beyond the traditional scope of the course. • Students are transforming from passive listeners to active learners.
  15. 15. Plan to Flip • What module / part of a module might you flip? • What will you need to create? What can you re-purpose? • What can you make use of that already exists? • Resources: Whatever, Whenever, Wherever (WWW) – maximise and suit different uses • Do you need to re-look at your learning outcomes? • How will you spend class time? • CPD – what further support/training might you need?
  16. 16. CPD Teaching approaches • PBL • Large group teaching techniques • Peer assisted learning • Case-based learning TEL • Powerpoints, Prezi, Emaze • Vodcasts/podcasts/screen capture – e.g. audacity, advanced ppt training. • Blogs • Xerte (creates learning objects and can build in tests) • Mindmaps • Curation tools (Scoop It, Pinterest, Storify) • I TunesU, YouTube • Questionmark perception – for ongoing testing • Online learning platforms – discussion boards etc Moodle • Smart board training – good for supporting PBL http://www.newberry.org/professional-development-programs-teachers
  17. 17. By the end of this session you will have: • Identified what flipping looks like • Expressed the benefits of flipping for student learning • Critiqued flipping practice – what is good practice? Where are the problem areas? • Considered how the various DigiThings may fit into a flipped classroom framework • Developed some initial ideas as to where and how they might flip their teaching

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