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Presentation on MIS and surveys

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Presentation on MIS and surveys

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Presentation on MIS and surveys

  1. 1. PRESENTATION ON M.I.S & EXPLORATORY SURVEY, DESCRIPTIVE SURVEY, CAUSAL SURVEY.PRESENTED BY ALOK KUMAR CHANDRAKANT EZONG JINIA BISWAS NAYAN SAHA PRETAM LAHA PANKAJ AGARWAL POUSALI MUKHERJEE RAJESHWARI SAHU SRIPARNA CHAKRABORTY
  2. 2.  The MIS is defined as a system which provides information support for decision-making in the organisation.  It is an integrated system of man and machine for providing information to support the operations, the management and decision-making function in the organisation. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM
  3. 3. FEEDBACK In an organizational context, feedback is the information sent to an entity (individual or a group) about its prior behavior so that the entity may adjust its current and future behavior to achieve the desired result. Feedback occurs when an environment reacts to an action or behavior. For example, 'customer feedback' is the buyers' reaction to a firm's products and policies, and 'operational feedback' is the internally generated information on a firm's performance. Response to a stimuli (such as criticism or praise) is considered a feedback only if it brings about a change in the recipient's behaviour.
  4. 4. REPLANNING  Replanning is a decision, where modified goals and modified courses of action are alternatives. The prospect of future replans, beyond the current choice, should influence the decision.  Cues are uncovered that can indicate when a replan is appropriate, or when the current plan should be left unchanged.  Replanning is then placed in an organizational context. Organizations circumscribe the alternatives, channel the information, and shape the preferences used by decision- makers to replan.  The replanning decision, in turn, can powerfully affect the organization by propagating change through a means-end hierarchy of plans.
  5. 5. Follow-up, feedback and replanning
  6. 6.  M/s. XYZ Ltd., a very large multinational promotional organization, with head office at London,  Huge commercial success of Kitchenette product line all over Europe in 70s,  Metal Box India Limited(MBIL), one of their major international clients in India launched Kitchenette products in India in 1978,  Kitchen beautification and storage in tin containers launched,  Offered storage of solid food products as well as enlivened the kitchen atmosphere(healthy, hygienic , clean-neat),  Targeted mostly at the busy, urban housewives – wife, mother and professionals. BRIEF
  7. 7.  MBIL followed up the commercial success of Kichenette products in the UK and launched them in India in 1978.  Like MBIL, UK, MBIL India also targeted the housewives who wore “three hats” that’s of a wife, a mother and a professional herself.  MBIL, India also considered safety, hygiene, comfort and effective time-management as criteria for purchase decisions.  Heavy promotion done to imprint on the buyers’ minds. FOLLOW UP
  8. 8.  However, the Kitchenette products, despite heavy promotion, failed in India.  Throughout the Introduction Phase of its product life cycle, sales and growth limped in Western and Northern India. Sales were downright poor in South, Central and Eastern India in the urban centres. FEEDBACK
  9. 9. According to us ,  Women were employed in peripheral as packing and labelling rather than in core jobs that carried relatively higher wages.  Educated housewives not given major decision- making powers. They just looked after the food to be cooked.  Most of the educated women were housewives, who did not venture out much in the market and hence, had limited knowledge of kitchen products.  Women were not socially active. WHY KITCHENETTE FAILED IN INDIA?
  10. 10.  Unlike women in the UK, Indian women were a lot more apprehensive about new products. They did not accept anything easily.  Indian women were dependent on decisions taken by their husbands unlike in the UK.  South, Central and Eastern India were not very going and developed at the time. Educated women were married off at a young age.  Working womens’ income was not considered valuable and hence, their suggestions were generally ignored.  So even , if most of the urban women were educated, of which some were professionals, important decisions like the family budget wrested with the male head. Indeed, understanding the consumers’ buying behaviour was necessary on MBIL’s part. WHY KITCHENETTE FAILED IN INDIA?
  11. 11.  It was absolutely necessary to study the general lifestyles of the urban, Indian women and to assess their buying behaviour.  The cultural, social and personal factors affecting their buying behaviour must be assessed.  The primary reference group of women in urban India were the most influential and hence.  Perhaps, it would have been better to first persuade the males of the urban society regarding the advantages of the product. REPLANNING
  12. 12.  Promotional strategies may be worked out targetting the male population as well.  MBIL, India must make a clear distinction between the mindsets of women in India compared to those of UK , based on their decision-making power. REPLANNING
  13. 13. What is Research? In the broadest sense of the word, the definition of research includes any gathering of data, information and facts for the advancement of knowledge. Research is a process of steps used to collect and analyze information to increase our understanding of a topic or issue". It consists of three steps: Pose a question, collect data to answer the question, and present an answer to the question
  14. 14.  Market research involves the capture and analysis of consumer, competitor and market trend data.  The principal role of market research, is to provide a business with a comprehensive view of consumers in order to develop products and services that satisfy their needs better than the competition.  Decisions need to be informed and market research helps to support this process, significantly reducing the level of financial risk attached with investment decisions.  It also influences decisions to target capital investment on projects that will offer the best return on that investment, such as opening a new store or entering a new market. What is Market Research?
  15. 15.  Exploratory research is the broadest and least theoretically-grounded of the three types of research. Essentially, you have no starting theory or hypothesis about a problem. In fact, you don't even know if there is a problem to begin with. In exploratory research, you simply start collecting information about something. It is similar to data mining, and it does not always produce results that can be useful. However, it generally gives you a better idea about something. Exploratory Research
  16. 16. Why ? The reason is usually budgetary; even expensive focus groups pale in cost next to large scale surveys. The techniques we classify as “exploratory” generally provide information and insight to researchers as they prepare for larger research efforts such as surveys and experiments.
  17. 17.  First, exploratory research can assist market researchers in finding possible causes to the symptoms communicated by decision makers.  Second, exploratory research can uncover possible avenues for reaching decision makers’ objectives.  Third exploratory research answers questions about actually administering a large and expensive research project. For example, They can get a sense of how best to reach the people (e.g., mail versus telephone versus Internet). Why ?
  18. 18.  Focus Group Interviews focus groups are small groups of six to ten participants plus one “moderator” brought together to discuss an issue or issues of interest to the researcher and decision maker. Typically, focus group interviews last from sixty to ninety minutes. How ?
  19. 19. Benefits of Focus Groups First they can be assembled and conducted relatively quickly. Second even when professionally moderated, a single focus group costs relatively little to conduct. Third the group format of a focus group holds the potential for more productive conversation
  20. 20.  Depth interviews share some similarities with focus groups. They both produce qualitative data; they both attempt to uncover the feelings and motives behind the marketplace actions of consumers; they both help explore research questions in preparation for larger data collection efforts.  Depth interviews are intended to go more in-depth with individuals, uncovering deeper feelings and more detailed life experiences that may be relevant to their behaviors toward a product or brand. Depth-interview
  21. 21. When using projective techniques, interviewers ask participants to “project” themselves into a fictitious or contrived circumstance or ask them to assume the role of a fictitious person. In this way participants feel they are speaking in hypothetical terms or feel they are speaking about someone other than themselves. This makes them feel less vulnerable and ironically leads to more candid conversation. Interviewers can present participants with a wide variety of visual or written material and ask the participants to comment. Projective techniques
  22. 22. a) One favorite is sentence completion, where participants complete sentences about products, people or consumption situations. b)Another projective technique favored by marketers is cartoon interpretation. Participants receive a carton drawing and are asked to provide some or all of the dialogue. Projective techniques
  23. 23.  Descriptive survey typically seeks to ascertain respondents' perspectives or experiences on a specified subject in a predetermined structured manner. WHAT IS DESCRIPTIVE SURVEY
  24. 24.  Involves either identifying the characteristics of an observed phenomenon or exploring possible correlations among two or more phenomena.  In every case, descriptive research examines a situation AS IT IS.  It does not involve changing or modifying the situation under investigation, nor is it intended to determine cause-and-effect relationships.  Strategies include sampling, making observations, interviewing – take on a very different form when we want them to yield quantitative data. DESCRIPTIVE QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH
  25. 25.  Include observation studies, correlational research, developmental designs, and survey research.  All of these approaches yield quantitative information that can be summarized through statistical analyses.  Survey research is the most frequently used in all disciplines. DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH DESIGN
  26. 26.  To look beyond the fact; to go beyond the observation.  To describe things, such as the market potential for a product or the demographics and attitudes of consumers who buy the product. OBJECTIVES OF DESCRIPTIVE SURVEY
  27. 27. Campus Ahmedabad Campus: Karnavati Knowledge Village, A/907,Uvarsad, S.G.Highway, Gandhinagar Kolkata Campus: Infinity Benchmark Tower 10th Floor, Plot - G1, Block - EP& GP, Sec - V, Salt Lake, Kolkata. Reg. Office: 407, Zodiac Square, 4th Floor Opp. Gurudwara, S.G. Road, Bodakdev, Ahmedabad. http://www.unitedworld.edu.in/

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