Presentation by Richard Yelland, OECD Head of Policy Advice and Implementation Division

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Presentation by Mr Richard Yelland, OECD Head of Policy Advice and Implementation Division, at the conference "Quality Education for Better Schools, Results and Future" organized by UNICEF and the Ministry of Education in Podgorica, July 8-10, 2014

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Presentation by Richard Yelland, OECD Head of Policy Advice and Implementation Division

  1. 1. BETTER SCHOOLS FOR BETTER LIVES Richard Yelland OECD Directorate for Education and Skills Podgorica, Montenegro 8 July 2014
  2. 2. • OECD’s role and how we work – Collection of comparative data and production of indicators – Benchmarking – Best practice – Peer learning – Policy analysis – Advice and assistance Improving the quality of education
  3. 3. 3 PISA in brief • Over half a million students… – representing 28 million 15-year-olds in 65 countries/economies … took an internationally agreed 2-hour test… – Goes beyond testing whether students can reproduce what they were taught… … to assess students’ capacity to extrapolate from what they know and creatively apply their knowledge in novel situations – Mathematics, reading, science, problem-solving, financial literacy – Total of 390 minutes of assessment material … and responded to questions on… – their personal background, their schools and their engagement with learning and school • Parents, principals and system leaders provided data on… – school policies, practices, resources and institutional factors that help explain performance differences .
  4. 4. 4 The structure of the PISA assessment 2000 2003 2006 2009 2012 2015 Reading Reading Reading Reading Reading Reading Mathematics Maths Maths Maths Maths Maths Science Science Science Science Science Science Problem Solving Digital Reading Problem Solving, Financial literacy, Digital Math, Digital reading Collaborative Problem Solving, Financial literacy,
  5. 5. Change in performance between PISA 2003 and 2012 Indonesia Thailand Russian Fed. United States Latvia Spain Norway Luxembourg Ireland Austria Switzerland Japan Liechtenstein Korea Brazil Tunisia Mexico Uruguay Turkey Greece Italy Portugal Hungary Poland Slovak Republic OECD average Germany Sweden France Denmark Iceland Czech Republic New Zealand Australia Macao-China Belgium Canada Netherlands Finland Hong Kong-China -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 350 400 450 500 550 600 Averageannualmathematicsscorechange Average mathematics performance in PISA 2003 ImprovingperformanceDeterioratingperformance PISA 2003 performance below the OECD average PISA 2003 performance above the OECD average Fig I.2.18 5
  6. 6. • Education at a Glance – Published annually: a compendium of statistics and indicators on a wide range of topics • The Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) – First results in 2013 • TALIS – the Teaching and Learning International Survey – www.oecd.org/talis It’s not just about PISA…
  7. 7. The Survey of Adult Skills
  8. 8. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 88 TALIS in Brief …representing more than 4 million teachers in 34 countries… Over 100 thousand randomly selected lower secondary teachers and their school leaders from over 6500 schools …took an internationally-agreed survey about the working conditions and learning environments in their schools… …responding to questions about their background, their teaching practices, support and development, their relationships with colleagues and students and the leadership in their schools
  9. 9. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 99 Participating countries *Note: TALIS only runs in a sub-national entity of the following countries: Belgium (Flemish Community), Canada (Alberta), United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi) and United Kingdom (England) . This map is for illustrative purposes and is without prejudice to the status of or sovereignty over any territory covered by this map. TALIS 2008 & 2013
  10. 10. Developing Teaching as a profession Recruit top candidates into the profession Support teachers in continued development of practice Retain and recognise effective teachers – path for growth Improve the societal view of teaching as a profession Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status1010 TALIS seeks to help with …
  11. 11. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1111 Gender and age distribution of teachers Percentage of female teachers in lower secondary and their age Singapore AbuDhabi(UAE) Malaysia Brazil England(UK) Alberta(Canada) Poland Flanders(Belgium) Mexico France Romania Korea Israel Portugal Average Serbia Chile Croatia Japan Iceland SlovakRepublic Finland Norway Spain CzechRepublic Denmark Netherlands Australia Sweden Latvia Bulgaria Estonia Italy 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Under 30 years 30-49 years 50-59 years 60 years or more Female
  12. 12. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1212 TALIS in Brief For a majority of TALIS countries, Few countries attract the most experienced teachers… …to the most challenging schools.
  13. 13. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1313 Gender and age distribution of principals Percentage of female principals in lower secondary education and their age Romania Brazil Spain Serbia Israel Alberta(Canada) Flanders(Belgium) Singapore SlovakRepublic AbuDhabi(UAE) Mexico Croatia Finland Average England(UK) Iceland Chile Netherlands Poland CzechRepublic Estonia Portugal Australia Bulgaria Sweden Latvia Denmark Norway France Italy Malaysia Japan Korea 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Under 40 years 40-49 years 50-59 years 60 years or more Female
  14. 14. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1414 Impact of professional development …the professional development in which they have participated has had a positive impact on their teaching. Regardless of the content, over 3/4 of teachers report that…
  15. 15. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1515 Teachers and feedback On average across TALIS countries, ...and only one in 5 receive feedback from three sources. Just above half of the teachers report receiving feedback on their teaching from one or two sources
  16. 16. Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report using the following methods of assessing student learning "frequently" or "in all or nearly all lessons" Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1616 Reported use of methods of assessing student learning 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Latvia Japan Korea Finland Slovak Republic Czech Republic Romania Estonia Poland Netherlands Serbia Iceland Bulgaria Italy Sweden Denmark FlandersBrazil Malaysia Israel Chile Croatia United States Alberta (Canada) Spain Singapore Mexico France Norway Australia Portugal England (UK) Abu Dhabi Develop and administer own assessment Administer a standardised test Provide written feedback on student work in addition to a mark, i.e. Numeric score or letter grade Observe students when working on particular tasks and provide immediate feedback
  17. 17. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1717 Countries where teachers believe their profession is valued show higher levels of student achievement Relationship between lower secondary teachers' views on the value of their profession in society and the country’s share of top mathematics performers in PISA 2012 Australia Brazil Bulgaria Chile Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Iceland Israel Italy Japan Korea Latvia Mexico Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Serbia Singapore Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Alberta (Canada) England (UK) Flanders (Belgium) United States 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Shareofmathematicstopperformers Percentage of teachers who agree that teaching is valued in society R2 = 0.24 r= 0.49
  18. 18. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1818 Drivers of job satisfaction The more frequently that teachers report participating in collaborative practices with their colleagues, the higher their level of self-efficacy. The same is true for job satisfaction.
  19. 19. • Education has to manage a constant tension between quality control and innovation • We need to be sure that all schools achieve minimum standards and that is achieved through evaluation and assessment • But we also need to be sure that systems have scope to change and develop Quality and innovation
  20. 20. “The Nature of Learning: Using Research to Inspire Practice” OECD Publications, Sept. 2010, 338pp.
  21. 21. ‘Innovative Learning Environments’ 2013 21 Based especially on 40 case studies from 20 countries, (plus 85 self-report notes) Develops and presents the ILE framework Extended extracts - innovations are ‘in their own words’, & bring the concepts and principles to life
  22. 22. The Learning Principles – environments should: • Make learning central, encourage engagement, and be where learners come to understand themselves as learners • Ensure that learning is social and often collaborative • Be highly attuned to learners’ motivations and the importance of emotions • Be acutely sensitive to individual differences including in prior knowledge • Be demanding for each learner but without excessive overload • Use assessments consistent with its aims, with strong emphasis on formative feedback • Promote horizontal connectedness across activities and subjects, in-and out-of-school Moreover, all should be present not one or two. 22
  23. 23. Profiling the Pedagogical Knowledge of the Teaching Profession Innovative Teaching for Effective Learning
  24. 24. • To investigate the pedagogical knowledge of teachers and the knowledge dynamics in the teaching profession. • What is pedagogical knowledge? – The specialised knowledge of teachers for creating effective teaching and learning environments for all students. Project Objectives
  25. 25. Research Question #1 Science of Learning, including the neurosciences • huge progress in understanding how the human brain works The potential of the learning sciences • to inform the pedagogical knowledge of teachers and, hence, • to improve pedagogical practice is significant. Does the knowledge base of the teaching profession sufficiently incorporate the latest scientific research on learning?
  26. 26. Policy imperative for the teaching and learning of 21st century skills, might entail • a re-skilling of the current teacher workforce and • upgrading of the knowledge base of the teaching profession. Does the knowledge base of the teaching profession meet the expectations for teaching and learning 21st century skills? Research Question #2
  27. 27. • Work in progress • Analysing what policy makers, practitioners, employers and parents believe about skills; what the evidence tells us; what stakeholders actually do; and the gaps between them 27 The role of social and emotional skills
  28. 28. Conceptualising skills
  29. 29. Which socio-emotional skills matter? Theevidence
  30. 30. Social and emotional skills are malleable Theevidence Heckman and Kautz (2014) • Sensitive periods for cognitive skills tend to be early • Sensitive periods for social and emotional skills are much longer
  31. 31. CognitiveCognitive Social & Emotional Social & Emotional Time = tTime = t-1 Contexts (learning inputs) Skills beget skills
  32. 32. • Data, indicators and benchmarking provide evidence for policy makers • Research and innovation provide ideas • The role of policy analysis is to turn that into useful advice for specific countries at specific times 32 Policy analysis and advice
  33. 33. Equity and quality Preparing students for the future School improvement Evaluation and assessment Outcomes OECD Education Policy Outlook series A window into countries’ education systems and their education policy reforms
  34. 34. It aims to provide policy makers, stakeholders and others with information to help them make policy with: TRENDS: An overview of current reforms and policy options adopted across OECD countries  COUNTRY SNAPSHOTS: Access to individual country analysis: (34) SPECIAL FOCUS ON IMPLEMENTATION OF REFORMS: Evolving TUAC/BIAC OECD Education Policy Outlook: Comparative Report
  35. 35. Context: Students, institutions and system Context: Selected indicators Key issues and goals Recent policy responses Spotlight OECD Education Policy Outlook: Comparative Report Part 2. Country policy snapshots
  36. 36. • Helping policy makers to help themselves • Improving access to OECD data and analysis The Education GPS
  37. 37. http://gpseducation.oecd.org
  38. 38. What you can find on the Education GPS Features • Customised country profiles with latest data • Diagrams of education systems • Data analysis, by topic • Interactive charts and maps • Statistical reports • Links to relevant data sources • Printable documents • A visual network of education policy and practice • Key insights and Policy options for a wide range of topics, at a glance or in depth • Key OECD publications and links
  39. 39. • www.oecd.org/education • http://gpseducation.oecd.org/ • @RichardJYelland • richard.yelland@oecd.org Thank you and contact details

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