Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Realizing article 19 and 23 of the CRPD -
What is the way to meet the needs of children
with disabilities and their famili...
European experience in supporting children
and families at risk – basic principles (I)
• Protection and promotion of human...
European experience in supporting children
and families at risk (II)
• Child protection services
• Child mental health ser...
Acceleration of the process of positive
change in the CEE/CA region
• Reporting on the CRC and CRPD to the UN Committees
•...
WHO European Declaration in Health of Children
and Young People with Intellectual Disabilities and
their Families
Endorsed...
Accumulation of best practices in the region
• Development of early intervention services for children from 0 to 3
by repl...
Best practices: Development of support
services for families of children with
disabilities
• Parents who have a child with...
Complexity of changes in Central/Eastern
Europe and Central Asia
• Over 20 years of transition with different success
• St...
Development of services for children with
developmental disabilities in Lithuania
• Strong coalition of reform-minded prof...
Mental disability and other developmental disabilities:
model of services through life span
This model was developed by Vi...
Development of services for children with
developmental disabilities in Lithuania:
achievements and challenges
• Many chil...
Importance of early childhood
• The best time for investing effectively in quality of
childhood and parenting is 0 to 3 ye...
Analysis of obstacles and challenges
• Systemic gaps within health, social welfare and education sectors
• Poor /unequal d...
Components of successful implementation of
CRPD and CRC (I)
• Political will to invest in evidence-based and human
rights ...
Components of successful implementation of
CRPD and CRC(II)
• Shift of paradigm:
From policies and practices based on
• so...
We need to always keep in mind that
The barrier is not the disability
itself but rather a combination of
social, cultural,...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Presentation by Mr. Dainius Puras, Professor at University of Vilnius, Lithuania

653 views

Published on

Realizing article 19 and 23 of the CRPD - What types of- and considerations for social services at local level for children with disabilities?
From 4th Child Protection Forum in Tajikistan, 2013.

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Presentation by Mr. Dainius Puras, Professor at University of Vilnius, Lithuania

  1. 1. Realizing article 19 and 23 of the CRPD - What is the way to meet the needs of children with disabilities and their families? Dainius Puras Vilnius university
  2. 2. European experience in supporting children and families at risk – basic principles (I) • Protection and promotion of human rights of all children is a priority. State should support families so that they could effectively meet all needs of children • Political will: Community based and family focused services need to be developed and strengthened, with all relevant sectors involved • Institutional care is the last resort. Huge amount of evidence that institutional care is not (cost)- effective and violates human rights of children.
  3. 3. European experience in supporting children and families at risk (II) • Child protection services • Child mental health services (Child and adolescent psychiatry) • Child guidance clinics • Parent training – improving parenting skills • Special programs for mentally ill parents • Early intervention services • Developmental pediatrics • Preventive programs targeted at children and families at risk
  4. 4. Acceleration of the process of positive change in the CEE/CA region • Reporting on the CRC and CRPD to the UN Committees • WHO Declaration on Health of Children and Young People with Intellectual Disabilities and their Families (Bucharest, 2010) • Ministerial conference in Sofia, Bulgaria, November 2012 • First success stories of successful transition (Bulgaria, Georgia, Serbia and other countries) • Protection of rights of children with disabilities remains the most serious challenge for systemic change in the CEE/CA region
  5. 5. WHO European Declaration in Health of Children and Young People with Intellectual Disabilities and their Families Endorsed by Ministerial representatives of countries in WHO European region (including Central Asian countries) in Bucharest in November 2010 PRIORITIES FOR ACTION • 1.Protect children and young people with intellectual disabilities from harm and abuse • 2.Enable children and young people to grow up in a family environment • 3.Transfer care from institutions to the community • 4.Identify the needs of each child and young person • 5.Ensure that good quality mental and physical health care is coordinated and sustained • 6.Safeguard the health and well-being of family carers • 7.Empower children and young people with intellectual disabilities to contribute to decision-making about their lives • 8.Build workforce capacity and commitment • 9.Collect essential information about needs and services and assure service quality • 10. Invest to provide equal opportunities and achieve the best outcomes
  6. 6. Accumulation of best practices in the region • Development of early intervention services for children from 0 to 3 by replacing a medicalized approach • A team of medical and other professionals work in partnership with parents so that abilities and skills of child in all areas of his/her development are strengthened. • Rich experience in introducing modern practices of modern special education and replacing outdated principles and practices of defectology • Introducing modern approaches in social services that provide social support interventions to families • There is a need of sustainable support of these modern approaches so that they are not an exception, but a rule in the general system of services
  7. 7. Best practices: Development of support services for families of children with disabilities • Parents who have a child with disability need to receive professional support • Social work as a profession of crucial importance • Nurses who work in primary healthcare could be a part of emerging family support services • Financial support for families is important, but this is not sufficient - support services are needed • Support for development and activities of groups and organizations of parents
  8. 8. Complexity of changes in Central/Eastern Europe and Central Asia • Over 20 years of transition with different success • Still heavy burden of institutionalization of children with and without disabilities • Lack of family-friendly supportive interventions for families at risk and families who have children at risk • Gap in healthcare systems – lack of effective psychosocial services and developmental pediatrics • Poor involvement of interested citizens, such as parents
  9. 9. Development of services for children with developmental disabilities in Lithuania • Strong coalition of reform-minded professionals and national parents’ organization – “Viltis” (“Hope”), founded in 1989. • Complementing traditional medical model with social and educational model • Training a new generation of professionals, including social workers • Humanizing healthcare services and adding psychosocial and developmental component to pediatric services • Supporting of parents’ movement and enabling parents to become equal partners with professionals and authorities. Parents’ organization was a driving force of positive changes
  10. 10. Mental disability and other developmental disabilities: model of services through life span This model was developed by Vilnius university Child Development Center, and is now in the process of implementation throughout Lithuania Age: from 0 to 3(5) years Community-based early intervention services for children with or at risk of developmental disabilities - part of healthcare system; close cooperation with social (child protection and family support) services Age: school age (from 5 to 18-21 years) System of education is responsible for education of all children with disabilities; medical specialists serve as consultants when needed; close cooperation with social (child protection and family support) services Age: adulthood (over 18-21 years) Adults with developmental disabilities are integrated in the life of their communities by providing supported housing (group-homes), vocational and occupational services Residential institutions for children and adults with developmental disabilities – only in exceptional complex cases
  11. 11. Development of services for children with developmental disabilities in Lithuania: achievements and challenges • Many children with moderate and severe disabilities live with loving parents and enjoy basic rights, including education • 40 early intervention services (outpatient teams) for children with disabilities (0-4 years of age) in healthcare system; University Child Development Center – for complex cases, teaching and research • Many children with mild disabilities – in general schools, many children with severe disabilities – in special schools • Family support services – slow development • Summer camps for children and parents - as successful example of innovations • Independent living group homes and vocational/occupational services for young adults – still not enough to replace fully system of remote residential institutions
  12. 12. Importance of early childhood • The best time for investing effectively in quality of childhood and parenting is 0 to 3 years of age • This is the best time for managing developmental, emotional and psychosocial problems • The “meeting point” for professionals in pediatrics, psychology, child neurology and psychiatry, social work, education, special education, etc. • Prevention and elimination of institutional placement of children from 0 to 3 years of age is a priority task for the CEE/CA region • All these principles equally apply for children without and with disabilities
  13. 13. Analysis of obstacles and challenges • Systemic gaps within health, social welfare and education sectors • Poor /unequal distribution of services - need to balance between advantages of centralization and decentralisation • Lack of efforts for reaching the most vulnerable (outreach services) • Poor inter-sectorial cooperation • Traditions of excessive medicalization and focus on “cure” are still strong • Stigmatizing attitudes from society and professionals and society • Poor involvement of resources existing in communities and families • Old-fashioned practices still in place: parents are moralized, poverty used as argument for institutional placement; poor management of individual cases; lack of culture of evaluation (processes and not outcomes usually evaluated)
  14. 14. Components of successful implementation of CRPD and CRC (I) • Political will to invest in evidence-based and human rights – based policies and services • Independent monitoring • Mobilization of all majors stakeholders is needed for implementation of: General principles of the CRC (art. 2, 3, 6, 12) General measures of implementation of the CRC (legislation, data collection, independent monitoring, cooperation with civil society, allocation of resources) Main principles of the CRPD, including the right to live in family, community and open society
  15. 15. Components of successful implementation of CRPD and CRC(II) • Shift of paradigm: From policies and practices based on • social exclusion, medical model, institutional placement of children with disabilities To policies and practices based on • Social model, social inclusion, empowerment of families and children, developing family-focused and community based services
  16. 16. We need to always keep in mind that The barrier is not the disability itself but rather a combination of social, cultural, attitudinal and physical obstacles that children with disabilities and their families encounter in their daily lives.

×