Matt Kendall - NWC - Presentation UNAA Corporate Water Valuation Seminar 29.04.13

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Matt Kendall (General Manager, Planning and Evaluation Group, National Water Commission) - Presentation at the United Nations Association of Australia (Victorian Division) Corporate Sustainability Leadership Seminar ‘Corporate Water Valuation: Accounting for Risks and Impacts, Valuing Ecosystem Services’ held on Monday 29 April 2013, in partnership with National Australia Bank.

Held in support of the International Year of Water Cooperation, seminar addressed some of the challenges and opportunities associated with corporate water valuation, as well as local actions and global tools and initiatives in this area. It highlighted some examples of what Australian businesses are doing, alongside government and NGOs, to measure and manage their risks, impacts and dependencies on water.

Guest Speakers & Panelists included:
• Matt Kendall, General Manager, Planning and Evaluation Group, National Water Commission
• Rosemary Bissett, Head of Sustainability, Governance & Risk, Enterprise Risk, National Australia Bank
• Carl Obst, Editor, UN System of Environmental-Economic Accounting (SEEA)
• Jean-Michel Seillier, Regional Manager Victoria, Veolia Water
• Gioia Small, Regional Manager Sustainability and Vintrepreneur, Treasury Wine Estates
• Michael Spencer, Secretary, Water Stewardship Australia and Fellow, Department of Business, Law and Taxation, Monash University

Facilitator:
• Rob Gell, Environmental Entrepreneur, Chairman of UNESCO Western Port Biosphere, and Chair of Wildlife Victoria

More information available at: http://www.unaavictoria.org.au/education-advocacy/masterclasses/corporate-water-valuation-seminar/

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Matt Kendall - NWC - Presentation UNAA Corporate Water Valuation Seminar 29.04.13

  1. 1. Australia’s water resources –water security and ecosystemservices under the NationalWater InitiativeMatt Kendall
  2. 2. National Water Commission’sSymbol of ReconciliationUnited hands by Mark Beanland
  3. 3. COUNTRY RIVERRATIO BETWEEN THEMAXIMUM and theMINIMUM ANNUAL FLOWSBRAZIL AMAZON 1.3SWITZERLAND RHINE 1.9CHINA YANGTZE 2.0SUDAN WHITE NILE 2.4USA POTOMAC 3.9SOUTH AFRICA ORANGE 16.9AUSTRALIA MURRAY 15.5AUSTRALIA HUNTER 54.3Water security issues for AustraliaSource: Chartres C.J. & Williams J., 2006
  4. 4. ... of droughts and flooding rainsLast 10 years Last 12 months
  5. 5. Water use per capitaSource: UN Food and Agriculture Organisation, 2005
  6. 6. The National Water Initiative
  7. 7. Water entitlement reform
  8. 8. Water trading
  9. 9. • Ecosystems services are recognised in theNational Water Initiative via the term‘environmental and other public benefitoutcomes’• The NWI Policy Guidelines for WaterPlanning advocate the ‘identification of keyenvironmental assets, and key ecosystemservices and functions to be protected, andtheir water requirements’The National Water Initiative &ecosystem services
  10. 10. • Many public benefits are derivedfrom aquatic systems. It isimportant that these are clearlyrecognised to enable theachievement of sustainablewater use & to avoid unintendedconsequences• An ecosystem services approachprovides a mechanism to bemore explicit about the links &trade-offs that occur in decision-makinghttp://archive.nwc.gov.au/library/waterlines/87
  11. 11. Assessing water stress in Australian water systems• NWI requires that overused systems be returned tosustainable levels of extraction• But determining those levels can be challenging• NWC continues to undertake work in this area• E.g. http://nwc.gov.au/data/assets/pdf_file/0003/22935/Assessing-water-stress-in-Australian-catchments-and-aquifers.pdf
  12. 12. Trade-offs between environmental and consumptivebenefits from the increasing use of waterBAWater StressEnvironmental & ecosystem service benefitsIncreasing Water UseConsumptive benefitsBenefitCAs water use increases, consumptive benefits increase, but water stress increasesand ecosystem service benefits decline
  13. 13. Knowledge, Data and InformationIf you can’t measure it you can’t manage it…• Extensive efforts in data & informationcollection since 2004• Data collected by the states & territories,some compiled at national level• How efficiently & effectively is thisworking?• What is happening with water science?• Is data collection infrastructure adequate?
  14. 14. • Key outcome of NWI requiring allgovernments to report annually & publiclyon performance of rural & urban waterdelivery agencies• Large collection of time-series dataallows for analysis to supportcomprehensive & effective riskmanagement systems• Can be used to identify clear trends inwater managementNational performance benchmarkingin the urban and rural water sectors
  15. 15. • 2011-12 report is available now at http://nwc.gov.au/publications/topic/national-performance-reports/urban-2011-2012• Produced jointly by NWC, state & territory governments & WaterServices Association of Australia• Covers 80 utilities supplying 18.7 million Australians• Reports on 150 indicators, with in depth analysis of 30 indicators• Comprehensive time series data can be used for risk identification& mitigationUrban NPRsTypical residential bill (based on average residentialwater supplied), 2007-8 to 2011-12 ($)
  16. 16. • Water management shaped by scarce & variable supply• Current reforms aim to ensure secure, efficient &sustainable water supply for competing demands• Understanding & valuing ecosystem services is essentialfor business planning, decision-making & riskmanagement• NWC continues to work on transparency & assessmentproducts to improve availability of information foreffective water managementSummary

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