Presented by:
Craig Chester – Operations Manager, Fairtrade ANZ
Eco-Certification
Eco-efficiency
People better schooled in Eco-efficiency seem to agree on 3 core
practical objectives (Th...
Bill Gates in his recent visit stated he would be prepared to pay more
tax, but he’s not going to simply hand it over just...
Eco-certifications should have a limited lifespan
The goal is when all companies or brands themselves are instantly
recogn...
Imparting transferable skills better faming, greater
impact on the supply chain through greater yields
and higher quality
...
Development criteria
- Guaranteed minimum price
- Plus Fixed $/Vol for development projects
- Sourcing plans and pre-finan...
Obligations
 Pesticide Use
 Invest in equipment (Yields)
 No Child Labour
 25% re-investment in
Sustainable Farm metho...
Eco-labels within a mainstream market sell…
Poverty Alleviation
Human Rights
Choices and Control
Development
Environmental...
14%
49%
Simplify the Purchase: Barrier
removal to make it easy for
the 39% to buy +2 per year
and or give them a reason to...
23%
37%
44%
47%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
2009 2010 2011 2012
Label Recognition
Source: Colmar Brunton Jul 2012
% indicates c...
Michael J. Hiscox
HARVARD UNIVERSITY
Research focuses on international trade, foreign investment, immigration,
development...
© Fairtrade 2010
• 1 in 2 people in Australia recognise the Fairtrade mark. Similar
numbers for Rainforest Alliance.
• Dem...
• Advocate on behalf
of licensees
• Form partnerships
with NGOs to
support Fairtrade
message
• Lobby government to
create ...
Craig Chester, Fairtrade Australia - Presentation UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar 27.6.13
Craig Chester, Fairtrade Australia - Presentation UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar 27.6.13
Craig Chester, Fairtrade Australia - Presentation UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar 27.6.13
Craig Chester, Fairtrade Australia - Presentation UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar 27.6.13
Craig Chester, Fairtrade Australia - Presentation UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar 27.6.13
Craig Chester, Fairtrade Australia - Presentation UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar 27.6.13
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Craig Chester, Fairtrade Australia - Presentation UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar 27.6.13

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Craig Chester from Fairtrade Australia presented at the UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar held on 27 June 2013 hosted by Russell Kennedy, Melbourne.

Held in support of the United Nations 10 Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns, the seminar brought together experts and practitioners from across business, government and civil society to provide a platform for shared learning on integrating sustainable consumption and production measures throughout business operations, relationships and value chains.

Guest Speakers and Panelists:
- Tim Grant, Director, Life Cycle Strategies
- Joshua Bishop, National Manager – Markets, Sustainability and Business Partnerships, WWF Australia
- Craig Chester, Operations Manager Australia, Fairtrade Australia and New Zealand
- Liam Smith, Director, BehaviourWorks Australia, Monash Sustainability Institute
- Clinton Squires, Australian Managing Director, Interface

More information available at: http://www.unaavictoria.org.au/education-advocacy/masterclasses/sustainable-consumption-and-production-seminar/

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Craig Chester, Fairtrade Australia - Presentation UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar 27.6.13

  1. 1. Presented by: Craig Chester – Operations Manager, Fairtrade ANZ
  2. 2. Eco-Certification Eco-efficiency People better schooled in Eco-efficiency seem to agree on 3 core practical objectives (The World Business Council for Sustainable Development) 1. Increasing product or service value 2. Optimizing the use of resources; and 3. Reducing environmental impact
  3. 3. Bill Gates in his recent visit stated he would be prepared to pay more tax, but he’s not going to simply hand it over just because it is the ‘right thing to do’. Our Corporate Partners feel, rightly or wrongly, that this statement is relevant to them within production and consumption of their products. Ideally, governments change laws and legislate so companies are forced to pay more, and create sustainable access to the economy for the beneficiaries of trade. In the absence of this, Eco-labels have evolved to allow companies to do what many would like to do (pay more sustainable prices for products) but the conventional market does not naturally require.
  4. 4. Eco-certifications should have a limited lifespan The goal is when all companies or brands themselves are instantly recognisable to the market as standing for the positive benefits certifications provide… …i.e socio economic development and eco-efficiency gladly embraced by companies to a point that consumers are compelled to reward them with purchase, and there is a positive return on their investments along the supply chain
  5. 5. Imparting transferable skills better faming, greater impact on the supply chain through greater yields and higher quality Enabling beneficiaries to access the workplace market access which promotes longer term employment development • Creating better equipped, more valuable contributors to the economy. • Poverty or unfair market access models (conventional trade) takes away beneficiaries ability to add value to the economy – no investment in training and poor experience
  6. 6. Development criteria - Guaranteed minimum price - Plus Fixed $/Vol for development projects - Sourcing plans and pre-finance - Favours small holder farmers Producers are partners with a 50% ownership of the FT General Assembly. Environmental criteria - Pesticide use - Soil and fertilizers - Water and waste - Energy (and greenhouse gases) - Biodiversity (GMOs) Social criteria - ILO core conventions - Employment conditions - Occupational health and safety Trading standards - Traceability - Contracting & Labelling conditions All offer… … a risk management tool! Fairtrade facilitates Development ‘Trade instead of Aid’
  7. 7. Obligations  Pesticide Use  Invest in equipment (Yields)  No Child Labour  25% re-investment in Sustainable Farm methods  And others… In Return…  Personal Use  Community Infrastructure Obligations  Fairtrade Price and Fairtrade Premium $/kg built into Cost of Goods Obligations  Audit & 3rd Party Certification  Funds for On Ground Support Teams  IP for Logo Obligations
  8. 8. Eco-labels within a mainstream market sell… Poverty Alleviation Human Rights Choices and Control Development Environmental Sustainability TRUST
  9. 9. 14% 49% Simplify the Purchase: Barrier removal to make it easy for the 39% to buy +2 per year and or give them a reason to buy/ buy more Socialise the Purchase: Get the 14% to influence the 39% to buy +2 per year Passively Sustainable Actively Sustainable Price Quality Trust Drivers: Social Issues (Carbon, Human Trafficking, Animal welfare etc.)
  10. 10. 23% 37% 44% 47% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 2009 2010 2011 2012 Label Recognition Source: Colmar Brunton Jul 2012 % indicates conversion rate Converting ‘recognition’ to ‘regular purchase’ Recognition of FT Ever bought FT Buy FT nowadays (once a month or more) 98% 29% 2011 12% 44% 43% n=1,036 83% 37% 2012 14% 47% 39%
  11. 11. Michael J. Hiscox HARVARD UNIVERSITY Research focuses on international trade, foreign investment, immigration, development, government accountability, and private sector initiatives and standards for addressing social and environmental issues in global supply chains. • Low incomes, education & gender give more as a propotion of spend • Consumers becoming increasingly willing to pay more. • Studies show that fairtrade labels increased sales by as much as 10% • Strong evidence that ethical products are more than niche. • "A lot of people thought organic was a niche market but it's continued to grow…the fairtrade market has grown faster than the organic market ever grew…I think the trends are very clear that all these things are going to become more salient and important over time” *Sources: Harvard MIT Wholefoods Research Partnership April 2011
  12. 12. © Fairtrade 2010 • 1 in 2 people in Australia recognise the Fairtrade mark. Similar numbers for Rainforest Alliance. • Demand will remain steady up to a price increase of 8%* • Applying the Fairtrade label to products will increase sales up to 10.3%* *Sources: Harvard MIT Wholefoods Research Partnership April 2011* Colmar Brunton Jul 2012 Globescan 2011 Rank/26 Country Retail Spend EUR Growth Spend per Capita EUR 1 UK 1,498,207,592 12% $ 24.01 2 USA 1,030,670,695 10% $ 3.29 3 Germany 400,544,747 18% $ 4.88 7 Aust 192,692,075 16% $ 7.23 26 Total 4,916,379,643 12% $ 4.93
  13. 13. • Advocate on behalf of licensees • Form partnerships with NGOs to support Fairtrade message • Lobby government to create legislation that encourages, promotes & rewards companies to become Fairtrade • Facilitate the distribution of Fairtrade products through retail channels • Relationships with retailers WoW, Coles, Aldi and Independents • Instore and Point of Purchase activity • Research, develop insights and reposition Fairtrade brand to maximise consumer engagement in the AU market • Align or modify Global campaigns to create stronger presence for Fairtrade

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