Minnesota Museums Help Communities Grow Factsheet

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Minnesota Museums Help Communities Grow Factsheet

  1. 1. MINNESOTA MUSEUMS “Many people stop by the Robbinsdale Historical Society because they’re from our city and want to touch base with each other. We have high school annuals, artifacts, old maps, and photographs for them to reminisce around.” “The Carpenter St. Croix Valley Nature Center shares our natural world with those who will be making the decisions when we are no longer able to. Our young visitors’ comfort with the natural world will help them formulate the basis for sound environmental literacy in years to come.” “The Lamberton Area Historical Society was formed to acquire, restore, and maintain the Lamberton Blacksmith Shop as an historic educational site. It has become the centerpiece of the annual celebration, Hot Iron Days. Two scrap iron pours are held annually. At each pour at least 200 spectators observe. Local community groups provide food and entertainment and crafts.” “The Walker Art Center serves as a cultural hub and gathering spot for Minnesota - both onsite and online. We use programs such as our Open Field initiative to invite people to share their creativity with the broader community, we facilitate conversations and storytelling on mnartists.org and walkerart.org, and we present projects with a variety of partner organizations” MINNESOTA ASSOCIATION OF MUSEUMS minnesotamuseums.org Box 14825 Minneapolis, MN HELP COMMUNITIES GROW Quotes offered by respondents to the survey for the report, “Economic Contribution of Museums in Minnesota: A Report of the Economic Impact Analysis Program”, University of Minnesota Extension Center for Community Vitality, in partnership with Minnesota Association of Museums and the University of Minnesota Carlson Chair for Travel, Tourism, and Hospitality. Every Minnesota museum tells a story of its importance to the community.
  2. 2. KITTSON ROSEAU MARSHALL LAKE OF THE WOODS POLK PENNINGTON RED LAKE KOOCHICHING ITASCA ST. LOUIS LAKE COOK AITKIN CASS BELTRAMI RETAWRAELC NORMAN MAHNOMEN CARLTON CLAY BECKER HUBBARD ANEDAW CROW WING OTTER TAILWILKIN DOUGLAS TODD GRANT MORRISON PINE SCALELLIM POPE STEVENS STEARNS SWIFT TRAVERSE BENTON ISANTI KANABEC OGASIHC KANDIYOHI MEEKER WRIGHT SHERBURNE ANOKA BIG STONE CHIPPEWA MCLEOD HENNEPIN RENVILLE LAC QUI PARLE SIBLEY BROWN REDWOOD YELLOW MEDICINE DAKOTA SCOTT CARVER NOTGNIHSAW YESMAR NICOLLETLYONLINCOLN LE SUEUR RICE GOODHUE PIPESTONE MURRAY COTTONWOOD NOBLESROCK JACKSON BLUE EARTH WATONWAN WASECA FARIBAULT STEELE DODGE OLMSTED WABASHA WINONA FREEBORN MOWER FILLMORE HOUSTON MARTIN ECONOMIC IMPACT OF Museums are essential contributors to the vibrancy of communities throughout Minnesota as anchoring institutions that entertain, educate, and preserve. The following includes some key points from the results of a recent University of Minnesota Extension study titled “The Economic Contribution of Museums in Minnesota.” Statewide Reach: Every county in Minnesota has at least one museum. The Twin Cities alone has more than 50! Many Visitors: Minnesota museums attracted an estimated 14 million visitors in 2011. Compare that to 5.9 million visitors to Twins, Vikings, Lynx, Timberwolves, and Wild events COMBINED in 2011. Museums Employ Minnesotans: Museums in our state directly employ an estimated 1,700 full and part time workers, paying $80 million in wages. Yet museums do more with less; the average museum in Minnesota has just two paid staff. Volunteerism: In total, volunteers in Minnesota’s museums contributed an estimated 1.1 million hours of work in 2011 to our state’s cultural life. Economic Force: In 2011, Minnesota’s museums directly infused $337 million in spending into Minnesota’s economy. Including indirect impacts, museum wages and spending contributed $690 million to the state’s economy. Tourism: About 12% of all museum visitors were tourists, travelling from more than 50 miles to visit museums. Tourists visiting museums contributed $53 million to the state’s economy. MUSEUMS IN MINNESOTA Heritage Keepers: Over 60% of all museums in the state are foremost history museums, and historic houses comprised another 10%. Nearly a quarter of all museums listed “Library/Archive” as an important secondary function. Source: “Economic Contribution of Museums in Minnesota: A Report of the Economic Impact Analysis Program”, University of Minnesota Extension Center for Community Vitality, in partnership with Minnesota Association of Museums and the University of Minnesota Carlson Chair for Travel, Tourism, and Hospitality. Design: Kelsey Reinke MINNESOTA ASSOCIATION OF MUSEUMS minnesotamuseums.org Box 14825 Minneapolis, MN

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