PROMOTING CHARACTER EDUCATION BY UTILIZING POVERTY ISSUE IN ELT
ALONG WITH THE SUGAR GROUP SCHOOLS’ PILLARS OF CHARACTERS
...
knowledge, it is expected that it is supposed to create a thorough system, as the one established
by Sugar Group Schools, ...
SEMESTER ONE
SEMESTER TWO
Caring
Courtesy and manner
Sense of belonging and
1
responsibility to community Generosity
Accou...
The scheduled curricula are expected to be applied as well in the special sessions meeting the
homeroom teachers with the ...
Cycles of Poverty” is selected for the students to write the explanation text that requires having
sequences as its generi...
Basic
Competence &
Character
Character Embedded Activities
Learning
Materials
Glocal Poverty Communicative
English convent...
Basic
Competence &
Learning
Materials

Character
ve
Empathetic

Character Embedded Activities
 Students critique and revi...
Basic
Competence &
Character
Character Embedded Activities
Learning
Materials
NOTE:
In the character column, there are alw...
accomplishment such as the resources used and teachers’ action and attitude also need to be
underlined.
Lastly, poverty is...
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Promoting Character Education by Utilizing Poverty Issue in ELT_Mierza Miranti-icce2011

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Promoting Character Education by Utilizing Poverty Issue in ELT_Mierza Miranti-icce2011

  1. 1. PROMOTING CHARACTER EDUCATION BY UTILIZING POVERTY ISSUE IN ELT ALONG WITH THE SUGAR GROUP SCHOOLS’ PILLARS OF CHARACTERS Mierza Miranti Sugar Group Schools and Polytechnic Site PT Gula Putih Mataram Bandar Mataram, Lampung Tengah, Indonesia mierza.miranti@yahoo.com ABSTRACT The character education based curriculum launched by Depdiknas through a regulation No 20/2003 about the National Education System. Thus, schools, as the subject mentioned in the regulation, is demanded to be able to apply it. The system, however, generates some very basic questions especially in the classroom to the school management level. In the scope of school management, the issue emerged is on the integration of the formula into the school system. As for the classroom level, the questions dealt mostly with the lesson planning. This paper, however, focuses on the analysis of the application in English Language Teaching (ELT) which still uses KTSP (Kurikulum Tingkat Satuan Pendidikan or literally translated to Curriculum of Independent Education Unit). It integrates the expanded values taken from DIKNAS marked as the Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters. It discusses, at a glance, a thorough school system of character education that is established at the school as well as a thinking foundation. The integrated lesson plan is to be taught to the classes of grade twelve students. It starts on the planning in which the teacher should carefully find meaningful activities in line with the issue discussed, i.e. poverty, as well as the integrated character. Each activity will expectantly evoke the students’ affective aspects since the exposures given to the students are factual and distinctive i.e. by using creative writing to help students exposing their sense on the experience in which goes beyond the curriculum of language teaching. They are taken from what the students see everyday, but might not pay attention to. It also reports on the flows of activities conducted in the classroom. Finally, it is continued with the teacher’s reflection and concluded by suggestions for further research. Hopefully, the stages from the design to practice will encourage students to go beyond what is taught: better character. Keywords: character education, ELT, poverty, Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters INTRODUCTION Character education seems to be another challenge faced by teachers starting from the comprehending the system itself, lesson planning, to the application that requires all holistic approach since it does not only involve the students’ intelligence but also emotional quotients. Some people doubt that on the success of the integration of character education into the educational system due to a lot of reasons such as the lack human resources preparation especially in the implementation in classroom levels. Thus, it is a relieve to know that every school needs not to be worry if they carefully analyze the government’s regulation about Education System of the Nation that implicitly states the need of character education. It is stated in the UU No.2/ 2003 that the national education aims to develop the capacities and build the characters along with the nation’s civilization in terms of educating the nation. It also aims to give a portion on the development of pupils’ potentials to become citizens who believe in God, have good characters, as well as being healthy, creative, independent, democratic, and responsible. However, this data would not be sufficient to support schools in ensuring the quality of their teaching staff in the application. There are so many things to be considered starting from the capacities of every teacher in conveying the message or making the character education happen into bridging the gaps of one stage of moral reasoning which depends on the yardstick of physiological expectation of the students. Assuming that the school has the grasp of the Mierza Miranti – Promoting the Character Education by Using Poverty Issues in ELT along with the Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters
  2. 2. knowledge, it is expected that it is supposed to create a thorough system, as the one established by Sugar Group Schools, in order to make sure that the application will go deeper than the surface. The school starts by creating a system where the pillars or character virtues are set up by analyzing the virtues to be expected from the students. The pillars are designed to meet the characteristics of the culture and expected behavioral quality of the students and graduates. Afterward, it is classified into different level from kindergarten to high school that possesses different physical and psychological traits. A schedule is made to deepen the application of every trait or character. Finally, a session is devoted on a weekly basis to discuss each trait. The homeroom and subject teachers are then expected to work together to make the character education happen. Homeroom teachers are the ones expected to facilitate a weekly character education meeting that has been carefully planned by the character education team formed in every unit, from kindergarten to high school. Besides, subject teachers are required to design the lesson plans by embedding the characters into the KTSP (Kurikulum Tingkat Satuan Pendidikan or literally translated into Curriculum of Independent Education Unit). Eventually, it expected that the characters will be integrated in the application. Actually, KTSP gives full authority for teachers to really make use of the situation since the government only set some minimum learning indicators to be achieved. Thus, teachers can do a lot of maneuver in teaching in learning situation, which includes designing activities as well as integrating the virtues to give the most of the learning for the students. As for language teaching, the choice is even larger since the indicators only highlight on the skills to be mastered. The teachers can create topics or issues that are suitable with the students’ capacities, skills, interest, and of course expected virtues shown by the students in their actions or behaviors. This paper focuses on poverty which is one of controversial issues faced not only locally but also globally. The main objective of integrating this issue is more than to gain students’ interest. It aims to broaden students’ knowledge on what is happening outside the classroom wall, to help them achieving a higher order thinking skill (HOT), to sharpen their media literacy, and to grow their sensitivity as well as their awareness. The major issue is integrated into the activities conducted in one semester for grade twelve, which is broken down into three sub-issues i.e. Glocal Poverty, The Cycles of Poverty, and Solutions to Abolish Poverty. The application is then examined using teacher’s reflection that will also serves ideas for future research or practice. THE SUGAR GROUP SCHOOLS’ CHARACTER EDUCATION SYSTEM The government, which is represented by the Ministry of National Education, has set a guideline or minimum traits for schools and teachers to develop their own. The set of virtues is originated based on the nation’s characteristics, i.e. religion, Pancasila, culture, and National Education Objectives. From the four sources, the government set a list of expected characters as follow: 1. Religious 10. Nationalistic 2. Honest 11. Patriotic 3. Tolerance 12. Appreciative to one’s success 4. Discipline 13. Friendly/ communicative 5. Hard working 14. Peacemaker 6. Creative 15. Love to read 7. Independent 16. Care for the environment 8. Democratic 17. Socially care 9. Curious 18. Responsible The aforementioned virtues, adopted from the Manuscript of the Nation Culture and Character Training Module created by the Ministry of Education, are actually not restricted to change. A school or teacher can modify or provide additional virtues considered necessary to be added based on the need of the units. Therefore, the Sugar Group Schools formulate some Pillars of Characters to characterize their learning communities as follow: Table 1: The Sugar Group Schools Pillars of Characters and Values NO PILLARS VALUES Mierza Miranti – Promoting the Character Education by Using Poverty Issues in ELT along with the Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters
  3. 3. SEMESTER ONE SEMESTER TWO Caring Courtesy and manner Sense of belonging and 1 responsibility to community Generosity Accountable Interdependence Peace and conflict 2 Model citizenship Social justice and equity Conflict resolution Commitment Independent 3 Self Discipline Orderliness Acceptance integrity Appreciation and respect 4 for others Fairness Tolerance Critical thinking ingenious 5 To be solution oriented Courage Honesty active listener 6 To communicate well Confidence Ethical decision making Empathy Cultural awareness and 7 sensitivity Altruism Assertiveness Perseverance Self leadership 8 implementation Initiative Reliability The pillars were resulted form a careful analysis form the culture and expected behavior of the students. There were thorough research conducted under a Student Conduct Management Department, a division that provides a service for the school in monitoring and carrying out a system for the students’ conduct. Nevertheless, the above virtues will only become written list of character if the school management does not follow it up with without required planning and proper implementation. Therefore, the first preparation is subjected to the human resources as the ones who will implement the system. The Sugar Group Schools possess a Professional Development Department that executes the preparation. The first thing to do is to prepare leading figures that would next lead a Character Education team. The expected people are sent to series of external workshop that deal with character education and its implementation. Afterward, the appointed persons formed a Character Education team in each school whose duty is to create and monitor an alleged procedure in executing the system and producing the tools such as “The Character Movements” to help engaging the learning communities and also the Curricula of Character Education that includes the description, schedule, basic competence, activities, and resources. Basically, they prepare everything for the teacher so that the objectives are achieved. Figure 1: Screen shot of the Sugar Group Schools Character Education Curricula Mierza Miranti – Promoting the Character Education by Using Poverty Issues in ELT along with the Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters
  4. 4. The scheduled curricula are expected to be applied as well in the special sessions meeting the homeroom teachers with the students. The sessions provide the students deeper meaning of certain values due to the various activities and resources prepared by the Character Education Team. Yet for the subject teachers, the school does not restrict them to the schedule. They can freely integrate the values based on their objectives, plans. or activities. INTEGRATING POVERTY ISSUES Indonesia, as a so-called developing country, has been fighting for the issue poverty for years. The fight surfaces in many media. Unfortunately, not all teenagers are exposed to them. The stereotypes the students might watch in some television programs make it even worse. The students do not have opportunities to have balanced information to sharpen their critical thinking. Hence, the lesson will help them to find two different sides of information to reduce bias and stereotypes. They will also know that that Indonesia is one of the countries that have a considerable problem with absolute poverty. This type of poverty needs to be described more than the ones shown in the news that can define the word poverty itself (Narayan, 2010) as follow:  Being disabled (e.g. blind, crippled, mentally impaired, chronically sick)  Lack land, livestock, farm equipment, a grinding mill  Being unable to decently bury their dead  Being unable to send children to school  Having mouths to feed, fewer hands to help  Lacking able-bodied family member who can feed their families in a crisis  Having bad housing  Suffering the effects of destructive behaviors (e.g. Alcoholism)  Being “poor in people”, lacking social support  Having to put children in employment  Being single parents  Having to accept demeaning or low status work  Having food security for only a few months each year  Being dependent on common property resources. Indeed that poverty is a complex and a potentially sensitive issue. It happens around us but some teenagers might not even have any idea about it. Thus, the integration is intended to give the students awareness to a higher level of sensitivity even more: a commitment to action against poverty. Furthermore, the poverty awareness could encourage students to develop their practical skills which enable them to engage in active, participatory social interaction, as well as to apply positive attitudes and empathy towards others (Gowren, 2002). In this regard active learning methods are designed to give students the opportunity to explore their own thinking on the topics and to develop a range of skills including communication, presentation and critical-thinking skills that utilize and develop the pragmatic (doing), cognitive (knowing), and affective (feeling) domains. PROMOTING THE VIRTUES BY USING POVERTY ISSUES IN ELT Planning and Applying the Curriculum Embedding the Characters and Topics English language teaching in the KTSP has been so flexible in the design and application since the curriculum itself only requires the educators to achieve the skills as well as language components. The flexibility could easily help the teachers to further embed any topics to promote characters included in the topic itself or the activities. Basically the basic competencies discussed in this paper are the ones taught to grade XII in the first semester. The poverty topic itself is broken down into three sub topics, which is suitable with the skills given, i.e. “Glocal Poverty”, “The Cycle of Poverty”, and “Ways to Overcome Poverty”. Since most writing activities demands the highest order thinking skill, the focus of topic will have the largest correlation with writing activities. For example, the topic “Glocal Poverty” is chosen to stimulate students’ ability to compose a narrative monolog to be performed, while the topic “The Mierza Miranti – Promoting the Character Education by Using Poverty Issues in ELT along with the Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters
  5. 5. Cycles of Poverty” is selected for the students to write the explanation text that requires having sequences as its generic structure. The planning and series activities are carefully selected so that the students expectantly can develop their character. The expected character column sometimes is not always embedded in the material, but it is shown in the activities. For example, the students are expected to show good cooperation when they do team works. Hence, following is the abridged design and application map: Table 2: The Abridged Plan and Activities Embedding the Characters and Topics of Grade XII Sugar Groups Schools’ English Classes Basic Competence & Character Learning Materials GLOCAL POVERTY LISTENING Religiosity* Admitting Commitment* one’s fault Curiosity Promises Honesty Blaming Creativity Begging Character Embedded Activities  Students are asked to listen to songs and identify the expressions.  Students are asked to have a group discussion on the expressions in pairs and give examples using their own experience.  Students are asked to make situations for their friends to be responded to be submitted to the teacher.  Teacher read the corrected situations for the students to practice listening and give proper response as the answer. LISTENING Short formal or informal functional texts: Formal announcement in a theatre building. LISTENING Narrative Text Religiosity* Commitment* Courtesy and manner Active listener  As a class, students clarify their answers.  Students are asked to listen to a recorded text and identify the topic individually as a way to be an  Students are asked to listen once more and discuss in groups afterward for the specific information asked in series of questions.  In pairs, students are asked to find out the purpose of the text.  As a class, students have a teacher-led class discussion on the topic, the questions, and the purpose of the text as all discussions will show their. Religious Discipline Courtesy and manner Empathetic  Students watch the first part of a movie with “Glocal Poverty” topic and identify      READING Short formal or informal functional texts: Formal announcement in a theatre building. READING Narrative Text WRITING Creative opening of a theatrical performance. individually the rhetorical stages, purpose, specific information main ideas, chorological events, characterization. As a class, students and teachers discuss the rhetorical stages and purpose of the text. Students are given time to discuss in groups to answer specific questions, find out main ideas and chronological events. As a class, students and teachers discuss the specific questions and main ideas. Students watch the final part of the movie and continue identifying the chronological events and interpreting the character by writing the character plot line individually. Students sit with their group to share their finding and wrap it up with class discussion. Given a text, students identify contents and purposes of the text. In pairs, students discuss the given gapped and multiple choice exercise. In groups, students discuss the purpose of the text. As a class, students share the result of the discussions and to be clarified by the teacher. Religious Discipline Curious     Religious Discipline Curious Love Reading Empathy Religious Discipline Creative  Students are asked to read the text individually while answering in the questions in written form.  In pairs, students discuss the language aspects (functions, main ideas, and rhetorical stages).  Students are asked to discuss the characters in groups.  Teacher clarifies the students’ answers and result of discussion.  Students are asked to make the text based the generic structure and given prompts.  Students swap their works to be analyzed and edited by their peers for the English convention and content.  Teacher provides final clarification on the works . WRITING Religious Narrative Discipline prompt sheet – Creative  In groups, students are asked to make the draft of the text based the generic structure and given prompts. In the group, there will be division of a chained story  Students swap their works to be analyzed and edited by their peers for the Mierza Miranti – Promoting the Character Education by Using Poverty Issues in ELT along with the Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters
  6. 6. Basic Competence & Character Character Embedded Activities Learning Materials Glocal Poverty Communicative English convention and content. Empathetic  Students critique and revise their peers’ text (time for debate between peers is given).  Students are asked to develop the revised final copy of the text which is considered displayable.  Teacher provides final clarification on the narratives works. SPEAKING Religious  Students serve as a Master of Ceremony to initiate the theatrical performance of Creative Discipline another group. opening of a Courtesy  Students initiate a theatrical performance through creative opening. theatrical and manner performance. SPEAKING Religious  Students work in groups to prepare the performance of narrative monolog. Narrative: Discipline  Other groups analyze after the performance is conducted. Glocal Poverty Altruistic  The performing group evaluate and critique the others should they have any Confidence objection.  The performing group reinvent the performance (and monologs if necessary) based on the inputs and criticisms. SPEAKING Religious  Students, in groups, create a play using the expression of admitting one’s fault, Admitting Discipline making promises, blaming, and expressing curiosity in a production of theatrical one’s fault Altruistic performance and based on the narrative work. Promises Confidence  Other groups analyze the play and revise from flaws. Blaming Empathetic  The presenting group evaluate and criticize the inputs. Begging  The performing groups produce the final copy of the play.  The students present the play in a form of a theatrical performance in line with the narrative monologs from their own group and creative opening by other group. CYCLES OF POVERTY LISTENING Religious Giving Discipline commands. Curious Complaining Creative Expressing curiosity LISTENING Explanation Text Religious Discipline Courtesy and manner Empathetic  Students are asked to listen to a song and identify the expressions  Students are asked to have a discussion on the expressions in pairs and give examples.  Students are asked to respond to the expressions by doing assignments.  As a class students clarify their response.  Students watch the first part of a movie “Causes of Poverty” and listen to a    READING Short formal or informal functional texts Religious Discipline Curious READING Explanation texts Religious Discipline Curious Love Reading Empathy Religious Discipline Creative WRITING Short formal or informal functional texts. WRITING Explanation text Religious Discipline Creative Communicati               recorded explanation text to identify individually the rhetorical stages, purpose, specific information main ideas, and sequences. As a class, students and teachers discuss the rhetorical stages, and specific information of the text. Students are given time to discuss in groups to share the main ideas and sequences they have made. As a class, students and teachers discuss the main ideas and sequences also by inquiring the students’ knowledge on making cycles of sequences. Students continue by creating the cycle in groups. Teacher wraps it up with class discussion. Given a text, students identify contents and purposes of the text. In pairs, students discuss the given gapped and multiple choice exercise. In groups, students discuss the purpose of the text. As a class, students share the result of the discussions and to be clarified by the teacher. Students are asked to read the text individually while answering in the questions in written form. In groups, students discuss the language aspects i.e. the functions, main ideas, and rhetorical stages, as well as interpret and create the cycle of sequences of the text. Teacher clarifies students’ answers and result of discussion. Students are asked to make the text based the generic structure and given prompts. Students swap their works to be analyzed and edited by their peers for the English convention and content. Teacher provides final clarification on the works. In groups, students are asked to make the draft of the text based the generic structure and given prompts. In the group, there will be division of a chained story Students swap their works to be analyzed and edited by their peers for the English convention and content. Mierza Miranti – Promoting the Character Education by Using Poverty Issues in ELT along with the Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters
  7. 7. Basic Competence & Learning Materials Character ve Empathetic Character Embedded Activities  Students critique and revise their peers’ text (time for debate between peers is given).  Students are asked to develop the revised final copy of the text which is considered displayable. SPEAKING Short formal or informal functional texts: SPEAKING Explanation text Religious Discipline Courtesy and manner Religious Discipline Altruistic Confidence  Teacher provides final clarification on the explanation text.  Students worked as a group to create a new group’s short text and comprehension question.  Every group presents the text and read the questions for the other group to answer.  Teacher clarifies the answer.  Students worked as a group to create a new group’s short text and comprehension question.  Every group presents the text and read the questions for the other group to answer.  Teacher clarifies the answer. WAYS TO OVERCOME POVERTY LISTENING Religious  Students are asked to listen to a song and identify the expressions Accusing Discipline  Students are asked to have a discussion on the expressions in pairs and give Discussing for Curious examples. possibilities Active  Students are asked to respond to the expressions by doing assignments. Stating listener  As a class students clarify their response. stances LISTENING Discussion Text Religious Discipline Courtesy and manner Empathetic  Students watch speeches of Mandela and Mohammad Yunus and listen to a   READING Discussion texts WRITING Discussion text Religious Discipline Curious Love Reading Critical thinking         Religious Discipline Creative  Communicative Ethical decision  making  SPEAKING Discussion text Religious Discipline Confidence Courage SPEAKING Giving commands. Complaining Expressing curiosity Accusing Discussing for possibilities Stating stances Religious Discipline Altruistic Confidence Creative Ethical decision making         recorded explanation text to identify individually the rhetorical stages, purpose, specific information main ideas, and sequences. As a class, students and teachers discuss the rhetorical stages, and specific information of the text. Students are given time to discuss in groups to share the main ideas and sequences they have made. As a class, students and teachers discuss the main ideas and stances. Teacher wraps it up with class discussion. Students are asked to read the text individually while answering in the questions in written form. As a class, students discuss the questions and the function of the text. In groups, students discuss the language aspects i.e. the main ideas, and rhetorical stages, as well evaluating the appropriateness of the stages in abolishing poverty. Teacher clarifies students’ answers and result of discussion. Teacher checks the students’ result of interpretation and give feedbacks. In groups, students are asked to make the draft of the text based the generic structure and given prompts. In the group, there will be division of a chained story Students swap their works to be analyzed and edited by their peers for the English convention and content. Students critique and revise their peers’ text (time for debate between peers is given). Students are asked to develop the revised final copy of the text which is considered displayable. Teacher provides final clarification on the explanation text. Students worked as a group to create a new group’s short text and comprehension question. Every group presents the text and read the questions for the other group to answer. Teacher clarifies the answer. Students have to make sure to use the expression in proposing their stances. The opposing group create stances to debate the other group’s stances. Every group has to make sure that their stances are acceptable in a given time. Finally, a very short time is given to create a proposal of a group’s final formula. Mierza Miranti – Promoting the Character Education by Using Poverty Issues in ELT along with the Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters
  8. 8. Basic Competence & Character Character Embedded Activities Learning Materials NOTE: In the character column, there are always be “religiosity” and “committed/” since in every meeting will start with the following activities: *As a start to show their religiosity, students are asked to pray and mention what the things that made them feel grateful today. **To elicit their commitment/ discipline, before the lesson started, students are asked to arrange their chair as expected and to show their belongings. Reflection on the Planning and Activities At the time this paper is finished, the writer is still in the middle of the process. Yet, there are some notes to be made as a reflection to make the next teaching practice and research better. The first note is on the time management. THE learning activities should carefully be adjusted to make sure that the time is enough for exposures, elaboration, and also reflection. The least activity is considered important if the goal of maximizing the integration of the character education. In this last activities, students and the teacher shall sit together to learn some affective aspects form the learning process on that day, so the activities conducted by the students would not be only series of tasks and duties. The eliciting stages should be sufficient for the students to draw out a conclusion of the activities and discuss what characters expected to show during the completion of the works. Here, the writer realized the time she allocated is insufficient basically due to several reasons, both in and outside the classroom level. In the classroom level, the writer, based on the anecdotal note, she tried to keep the pace with the alleged slow learner as she needed to make sure that every student could get the grasp of the material. However, she might too focus on those students so she was unable to keep the time well. The next thing is the suitable exposures that make the students well equipped to produce outcomes as demanded in language learning: speaking and writing. The exposures – given by the teacher or browsed by the students themselves – are mostly given in the lesson which the focus is reading or listening. Here, the teacher faced some technical difficulties in searching for the suitable materials for the listening since she had to relate the listening skills expected with the topic. Finally, she put the listening skills before introducing the topic so that the students can still practice the required skills but do not distract the flow of the topic. Finally, one of the most determining factors leading to the success of integration is the teachers’ attitude and action during the lesson. A teacher has to make sure that she or he does not generalize or stereotype places or people present the world as one where poor people are helpless, and present the issue as global issue in which the students might think it is impossible to act against it. From the anecdotal note, it is very obvious that the resources giving the guideline to teach glocal issues such as the one form Oxfam and CVDEC Curriculum Development Unit really helped her at the time she need to focus on an issue. It facilitates her a lot in making sure that at the time of the integration she would emphasize on the issue and ways to overcome it. Yet, it is quite hard not to use stereotypes when the lesson is on narrative and the objective is to present a theatrical performance. CONCLUSION It is too premature to say that the integration done in one lesson can make a difference on the character education since the classroom itself is part of a school system. Thus, the Sugar Group Schools creates a comprehensive system of character education that start from the preparation of the human resources, paperwork needed, to the thorough system that involves of the learning community. As for the classroom level, integrating a development or global topic such as poverty can be really a helpful aid for a language teacher in promoting character education in the classroom since the flexible characteristic of KTSP really can make it happen and the topic itself could develop the pragmatic, cognitive, and affective aspects. Yet, a teacher should really have to make sure to provide reflection time to obtain the most of a lesson. The factors leading to the Mierza Miranti – Promoting the Character Education by Using Poverty Issues in ELT along with the Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters
  9. 9. accomplishment such as the resources used and teachers’ action and attitude also need to be underlined. Lastly, poverty is not the only developmental issues that can be applied. Here, the writer would like to suggest some other ideas for teachers to apply, such as the issues of social justice and equity, diversity, globalization, sustainable development, as well as peace and conflict. As for the research, it would be best to analyze the process of how character education is implemented in classroom levels to the whole school system. REFERENCES Flavin, C. (2001) Rich World, Poor World in L Brown, State of the World. London: Earthscan. Gowren, S. (2002). Counted Out: Challenging Poverty and Social Exclusion. CDVEC Curriculum Development Unit and Combat Poverty Agency in association with Folens Publishers . Dublin: Crumlin Kemendiknas. (2010). Naskah Bahan Pelatihan Pedoman Budaya dan Karakter Bangsa. Indonesia: Jakarta. Kemendiknas. (2010). Pembinaan Pendidikan Karakter di Sekolah Menengah Pertama. Indonesia: Jakarta. Lickona, T. (1994). “Raising Good Children”. New York: Random House, pp. 11-15. Narayan, D. et al. (2001). World Bank: Voices of the Poor-Crying Out for Change, World Bank. Oxford: United Kingdom. Oxford: Oxford University Press. OXFAM GB. (2006). “Teaching Controversial Issues”. Oxford: United Kingdom. Seabrook, J. (2003). The No-Nonsense Guide to World Poverty. London: New Internationalist and Verso. Mierza Miranti – Promoting the Character Education by Using Poverty Issues in ELT along with the Sugar Group Schools’ Pillars of Characters

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