Author(s): Barbara EcksteinLicense: Unless otherwise noted, this material is made available under theterms of the Creative...
Attribution Keyfor more information see: http://open.umich.edu/wiki/AttributionPolicyUse + Share + AdaptMake Your Own Asse...
PowerPoint Supported by theScience of LearningUsing the Assertion-Evidence Modelto Make Your Point
At the End of the Presentation……You Will Be Able To:• Explain how to minimize cognitive overload inpresentations• Construc...
Roadmap1. Traits of Good and Bad uses for presentationslides (5 minutes)2. Working Memory and How it Relates toPresentatio...
Small Group Brainstorm• WHAT DOES “DEATH BY POWERPOINT” LOOKLIKE? (2 minutes)– At your tables, come up with a list of trai...
Large Group Discussion• What is Working Memory?Objective 1Roadmap: 2
Working Memory• Working memory is the system that holds andprocesses new information as informationcomes in through your s...
Working MemoryHow did you process that slide?A. Read the text and tuned out what I was sayingB. Ignored the text and liste...
Working Memory is the cognitive system thatholds and processes new information.Babbage Baddeley’s model of working memory....
Working Memory is the cognitive system thatholds and processes new information.Babbage Baddeley’s model of working memory....
Working Memory is the cognitive system thatholds and processes new information.Babbage Baddeley’s model of working memory....
Working Memory is the cognitive system thatholds and processes new information.Babbage Baddeley’s model of working memory....
Working Memory is the cognitive system thatholds and processes new information.Babbage Baddeley’s model of working memory....
The phonological loop processes the WORDSthat our senses take in, through our ears andthrough our eyesPhonological LoopObj...
The phonological loop processes the WORDSthat our senses take in, through our earsand our eyesPhonological LoopPeter aka a...
Working MemoryHow did you process that text heavy slide?A. Read the text and tuned out what I was sayingB. Ignored the tex...
There are multiple ways in which a presentationcan overload working memory.WordsEyesEarsVisuo-SpatialSketchpadPhonological...
There are multiple ways in which a presentationcan overload working memory.EyesEarsVisuo-SpatialSketchpadPhonologicalLoopI...
There are multiple ways in which a presentationcan overload working memory.WordsEyesEarsVisuo-SpatialSketchpadPhonological...
Information received through images and sound can beprocessed and supports understanding and retention.WordsEyesEarsVisuo-...
Think-Pair-Share• What’s Wrong With These Slides?– Your handout has two slides on it. Come up withtwo things for each slid...
DOs and DON’Ts1. PowerPoint slides should have both visual and verbal components, presentingcomplementary information in b...
LearningOrganizationPerformance andOutcomes(3)LearnerDevelopment(2)EducatorDevelopment(4)Performance Support(7)Educational...
The assertion-evidence model keeps yourpresentation simple, clear and purposeful.Supportingphotograph,drawing, diagram,fil...
A Table of WordsDog Rug SevenTruck Man BananaFebruary Sit HatObjective 2Roadmap: 3
Fill In the BlanksDog SevenMan BananaFebruary SitObjective 2Roadmap: 3
The two words to the left and right of theword Man are the most important.Dog Rug SevenTruck Man BananaFebruary Sit HatObj...
Fill in the BlanksDog Rug SevenManFebruary Sit HatObjective 2Roadmap: 3
In the first case the evidence was shown first, the assertionsecond. In the second case the assertion came first.Dog Rug S...
In an assertion-evidence slide the headline is a sentence, nomore than two lines, that states the slide’s purpose.Supporti...
There are three conditions for writing a clearassertion-evidence slide.1. The assertion sentence makes sense by itself.Obj...
There are three conditions for writing a clearassertion-evidence slide.1. The assertion sentence makes sense by itself.2. ...
There are three conditions for writing a clearassertion-evidence slide.1. The assertion sentence makes sense by itself.2. ...
Nursing’s culture of accountability continues to resultin near perfect compliance.0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%Fire Sa...
Nursing’s culture of accountability continues to resultin near perfect compliance.0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%Fire Sa...
How would you turn each of the following slidetitles into an assertion-evidence slide?1. 2013 Productivity2. MSIS Employee...
Roadmap1. Traits of Good and Bad uses for presentationslides2. Working Memory and How it Relates toPresentations3. Develop...
Objectives:Create presentations that minimize cognitiveoverload.Construct Assertion-Evidence Slides.Objective 2Roadmap: 3
PowerPoint, when usedcompatibly with how peopletake in information, is a greattool.DonkeyHotey, Flickr
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PowerPoint Supported by the Science of Learning: Using the Assertion-Evidence Model to Make Your Point

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This presentation from the University of Michigan Medical School discusses the:

Traits of Good and Bad uses for presentation slides
Working Memory and How it Relates to Presentations
Developing Assertion-Evidence Model Presentations

At the end of the presentation, you will be able to avoid "death by PowerPoint."

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PowerPoint Supported by the Science of Learning: Using the Assertion-Evidence Model to Make Your Point

  1. 1. Author(s): Barbara EcksteinLicense: Unless otherwise noted, this material is made available under theterms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License:http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/We have reviewed this material in accordance with U.S. Copyright Law and have tried to maximize yourability to use, share, and adapt it. The citation key on the following slide provides information about how youmay share and adapt this material.Copyright holders of content included in this material should contact open.michigan@umich.edu with anyquestions, corrections, or clarification regarding the use of content.For more information about how to cite these materials visit http://open.umich.edu/education/about/terms-of-use.Any medical information in this material is intended to inform and educate and is not a tool for self-diagnosisor a replacement for medical evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a healthcare professional. Pleasespeak to your physician if you have questions about your medical condition.Viewer discretion is advised: Some medical content is graphic and may not be suitable for all viewers.
  2. 2. Attribution Keyfor more information see: http://open.umich.edu/wiki/AttributionPolicyUse + Share + AdaptMake Your Own AssessmentCreative Commons – Attribution LicenseCreative Commons – Attribution Share Alike LicenseCreative Commons – Attribution Noncommercial LicenseCreative Commons – Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike LicenseGNU – Free Documentation LicenseCreative Commons – Zero WaiverPublic Domain – Ineligible: Works that are ineligible for copyright protection in the U.S. (17 USC § 102(b)) *laws inyour jurisdiction may differPublic Domain – Expired: Works that are no longer protected due to an expired copyright term.Public Domain – Government: Works that are produced by the U.S. Government. (17 USC § 105)Public Domain – Self Dedicated: Works that a copyright holder has dedicated to the public domain.Fair Use: Use of works that is determined to be Fair consistent with the U.S. Copyright Act. (17 USC § 107) *laws in yourjurisdiction may differOur determination DOES NOT mean that all uses of this 3rd-party content are Fair Uses and we DO NOT guarantee thatyour use of the content is Fair.To use this content you should do your own independent analysis to determine whether or not your use will be Fair.{ Content the copyright holder, author, or law permits you to use, share and adapt. }{ Content Open.Michigan believes can be used, shared, and adapted because it is ineligible for copyright. }{ Content Open.Michigan has used under a Fair Use determination. }
  3. 3. PowerPoint Supported by theScience of LearningUsing the Assertion-Evidence Modelto Make Your Point
  4. 4. At the End of the Presentation……You Will Be Able To:• Explain how to minimize cognitive overload inpresentations• Construct Assertion-Evidence Slides
  5. 5. Roadmap1. Traits of Good and Bad uses for presentationslides (5 minutes)2. Working Memory and How it Relates toPresentations (10 minutes)3. Developing Assertion-Evidence ModelPresentations (15 minutes)
  6. 6. Small Group Brainstorm• WHAT DOES “DEATH BY POWERPOINT” LOOKLIKE? (2 minutes)– At your tables, come up with a list of traits of“good” uses of PowerPoint as well as traits of“bad” uses of PowerPoint.Objective 1 & 2;Roadmap: 1
  7. 7. Large Group Discussion• What is Working Memory?Objective 1Roadmap: 2
  8. 8. Working Memory• Working memory is the system that holds andprocesses new information as informationcomes in through your senses. A commonmodel of working memory includes fourcomponents:– Phonological Loop– Visuo-spatial Sketchpad– Episodic Buffer– Central ExecutiveObjective 1Roadmap: 2
  9. 9. Working MemoryHow did you process that slide?A. Read the text and tuned out what I was sayingB. Ignored the text and listened to meC. Read the text faster than I did and then tunedoutD. Read the text faster than I did and then tried totune into what I was sayingWrite down your answer on a scrap of paper. We willcome back to it in a few minutes.Objective 1Roadmap: 2
  10. 10. Working Memory is the cognitive system thatholds and processes new information.Babbage Baddeley’s model of working memory. WikipediaObjective 1Roadmap: 2
  11. 11. Working Memory is the cognitive system thatholds and processes new information.Babbage Baddeley’s model of working memory. WikipediaObjective 1Roadmap: 2Controls Focus of Attention
  12. 12. Working Memory is the cognitive system thatholds and processes new information.Babbage Baddeley’s model of working memory. WikipediaProcesses Language – Visualand AudioObjective 1Roadmap: 2
  13. 13. Working Memory is the cognitive system thatholds and processes new information.Babbage Baddeley’s model of working memory. WikipediaProcesses Images and OrientsPerson in SpaceObjective 1Roadmap: 2
  14. 14. Working Memory is the cognitive system thatholds and processes new information.Babbage Baddeley’s model of working memory. WikipediaMoves Information to LongTerm Memory
  15. 15. The phonological loop processes the WORDSthat our senses take in, through our ears andthrough our eyesPhonological LoopObjective 1Roadmap: 2Peter aka anemoneprojectors,Flickr
  16. 16. The phonological loop processes the WORDSthat our senses take in, through our earsand our eyesPhonological LoopPeter aka anemoneprojectors,FlickrSonia Belviso, Flickr
  17. 17. Working MemoryHow did you process that text heavy slide?A. Read the text and tuned out what I was sayingB. Ignored the text and listened to meC. Read the text faster than I did and then startedto daydreamD. Read the text faster than I did and then tried totune into what I was sayingObjective 1Roadmap: 2
  18. 18. There are multiple ways in which a presentationcan overload working memory.WordsEyesEarsVisuo-SpatialSketchpadPhonologicalLoopObjective 1Roadmap: 2
  19. 19. There are multiple ways in which a presentationcan overload working memory.EyesEarsVisuo-SpatialSketchpadPhonologicalLoopImagesObjective 1Roadmap: 2
  20. 20. There are multiple ways in which a presentationcan overload working memory.WordsEyesEarsVisuo-SpatialSketchpadPhonologicalLoopImagesObjective 1Roadmap: 2
  21. 21. Information received through images and sound can beprocessed and supports understanding and retention.WordsEyesEarsVisuo-SpatialSketchpadPhonologicalLoopImagesObjective 1Roadmap: 2
  22. 22. Think-Pair-Share• What’s Wrong With These Slides?– Your handout has two slides on it. Come up withtwo things for each slide that would improvethem. (2 minutes)Objective 1Roadmap: 2
  23. 23. DOs and DON’Ts1. PowerPoint slides should have both visual and verbal components, presentingcomplementary information in both word and picture form in order to takeadvantage of the way our brains process information.2. Filling the slides up with information will do nothing but overload an audiencemember’s cognitive system. Presenters must take into consideration the limitedcapacity of the human mind to take in and retain information at one time.3. A presentation should help the audience select, organize and integrate thepresented information by containing only the most relevant information in a waythat is well organized and easy for the audience to integrate with their priorknowledge.4. The Signaling Strategy: People Learn Better When the Material is Organized withClear Outlines and Headings5. The Segmentation Principle: People Learn Better When Information is Presentedin Bite-Sized Segments6. The Modality Principle: People Understand a Multimedia Explanation BetterWhen the Words are Presented as Narration Rather than On-Screen Text7. The Multimedia Strategy: People Learn Better from Words and Pictures thanfrom Words Alone8. The Coherence Principle: People Learn Better When Extraneous Material isExcluded Rather Than Included
  24. 24. LearningOrganizationPerformance andOutcomes(3)LearnerDevelopment(2)EducatorDevelopment(4)Performance Support(7)EducationalInnovation(5)Enterprise-Wide LearningArchitecture(9)EducationalTechnology (6)IdentityManagement(8)Mission: To be leaders in the development, innovation, implementation, and delivery of great educationalexperiences for UMHS faculty and staff.Develop Learning28%Educate Educator16%Support andEnhance ExistingTechnology24%Learner Support18%Administrative6% StrategicPlanning8%
  25. 25. The assertion-evidence model keeps yourpresentation simple, clear and purposeful.Supportingphotograph,drawing, diagram,film or graph --- nobulleted lists This is important. Pay attention toit.Objective 2Roadmap: 3
  26. 26. A Table of WordsDog Rug SevenTruck Man BananaFebruary Sit HatObjective 2Roadmap: 3
  27. 27. Fill In the BlanksDog SevenMan BananaFebruary SitObjective 2Roadmap: 3
  28. 28. The two words to the left and right of theword Man are the most important.Dog Rug SevenTruck Man BananaFebruary Sit HatObjective 2Roadmap: 3
  29. 29. Fill in the BlanksDog Rug SevenManFebruary Sit HatObjective 2Roadmap: 3
  30. 30. In the first case the evidence was shown first, the assertionsecond. In the second case the assertion came first.Dog Rug SevenTruck Man BananaFebruary Sit HatObjective 2Roadmap: 3
  31. 31. In an assertion-evidence slide the headline is a sentence, nomore than two lines, that states the slide’s purpose.Supportingphotograph,drawing, diagram,film or graph --- nobulleted lists Call outs if needed, no more thantwo linesObjective 2Roadmap: 3
  32. 32. There are three conditions for writing a clearassertion-evidence slide.1. The assertion sentence makes sense by itself.Objective 2Roadmap: 3
  33. 33. There are three conditions for writing a clearassertion-evidence slide.1. The assertion sentence makes sense by itself.2. The assertion sentence is clear and specific.Objective 2Roadmap: 3
  34. 34. There are three conditions for writing a clearassertion-evidence slide.1. The assertion sentence makes sense by itself.2. The assertion sentence is clear and specific.3. The visual reference directly illustrates orsupports the assertion.Objective 2Roadmap: 3
  35. 35. Nursing’s culture of accountability continues to resultin near perfect compliance.0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%Fire Safety forClinicians inPatient CareAreasFire Safety forNon Cliniciansin Patient CareAreasFire Safety forStaff in Non-patient CareAreasInfectionControlCertification(Clin PCA)InfectionControlCertification(Non-Clin PCA)Patient Safetyfor All Staffexcept MedicalClinical Facultyand HouseOfficersPatient Safetyfor MedicalClinical FacultyHouse Officersand PhysicianAssistantsUMHSCompliance forAll StaffUMHS CriticalIncidentMedical ClinicalDepartmentsNursing andPatient ServicesAssertionObjective 2Roadmap: 3
  36. 36. Nursing’s culture of accountability continues to resultin near perfect compliance.0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%Fire Safety forClinicians inPatient CareAreasFire Safety forNon Cliniciansin Patient CareAreasFire Safety forStaff in Non-patient CareAreasInfectionControlCertification(Clin PCA)InfectionControlCertification(Non-Clin PCA)Patient Safetyfor All Staffexcept MedicalClinical Facultyand HouseOfficersPatient Safetyfor MedicalClinical FacultyHouse Officersand PhysicianAssistantsUMHSCompliance forAll StaffUMHS CriticalIncidentMedical ClinicalDepartmentsNursing andPatient ServicesEvidenceObjective 2Roadmap: 3
  37. 37. How would you turn each of the following slidetitles into an assertion-evidence slide?1. 2013 Productivity2. MSIS Employee Satisfaction3. Phases of the ProjectObjective 2Roadmap: 3
  38. 38. Roadmap1. Traits of Good and Bad uses for presentationslides2. Working Memory and How it Relates toPresentations3. Developing Assertion-Evidence ModelPresentations
  39. 39. Objectives:Create presentations that minimize cognitiveoverload.Construct Assertion-Evidence Slides.Objective 2Roadmap: 3
  40. 40. PowerPoint, when usedcompatibly with how peopletake in information, is a greattool.DonkeyHotey, Flickr

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