Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Writing A Sexier Research Abstract: Making Research In Life Science More Discoverable

119 views

Published on

Tips and tricks for writing abstracts for science research articles to maximise citations and impact. Presented at the University of Michigan in May 2018.

Published in: Science
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Writing A Sexier Research Abstract: Making Research In Life Science More Discoverable

  1. 1. Writing A Sexier Research Abstract: Making Research In Life Science More Discoverable PF Anderson, Enriching Scholarship, May 8, 2018
  2. 2. exciting, stimulating, interesting, appealing, intriguing, slick, red-hot Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/230162/chili-pepper>
  3. 3. Why would you want a sexier abstract? Charles A. Schwartz. The Rise and Fall of Uncitedness. College & Research Libraries, January 1997, 19-29. Uncitedness Rates No Disaggregation Articles Only Physical Sciences 47% 22% Social Sciences 75% 48% Humanities 98% 93%
  4. 4. Why would you want to rewrite your abstract? “Citation impact indicators nowadays play a prominent role in the evaluation of scientific research. The importance of citation impact indicators in the context of research evaluation has increased a lot during the past decades, and this is reflected in a rapidly growing body of scientific literature in which citation impact indicators are studied.” Waltman L. A review of the literature on citation impact indicators. Journal of Informetrics 2016 10(2):365-391. Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/219181/impact>
  5. 5. Why would you want to rewrite your abstract? “Since quantitative performance measures, notably publication and citation counts, are associated strongly with life‐cycle remuneration and career mobility, both should be utilised in research assessment exercises.” Cronin B. Research brief rates of return to citation. Journal of Documentation 1996 52(2):188-197 Image credits: <<https://openclipart.org/detail/293410/big-bag-of-cash>
  6. 6. Why would you want to rewrite your abstract? “Scientific and science-based innovations begin with one or few researchers significantly deviating from previous research practices, a deviation with subsequently diffuses in the community.” “This publicly available knowledge can be understood as the core of a community’s knowledge, and can be unobtrusively studied by bibliometrics.” Gläser J, Laudel G. A Bibliometric Reconstruction of Research Trails for Qualitative Investigations of Scientific Innovations. Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung 2015 40(3):299-330. Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/175355/open-innovation-on>
  7. 7. Why would you want to rewrite your abstract? “In this submission we introduce the notion of under-cited influential publications and show that these publications are like “wake-up switches” for significant follow-up research. … Moreover, one may say that under-cited influential publications belong to the group of truly foundational scientific discoveries acting as promoters of influential research as shown by significant follow-up research.” Hu X, Rousseau R. Scientific influence is not always visible: The phenomenon of under-cited influential publications. Journal of Informetrics 2016 10(4):1079-1091. Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/185914/scientist-with-beaker>
  8. 8. Why would you want to rewrite your abstract? Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/219181/impact> <https://openclipart.org/detail/293410/big-bag-of-cash> | <https://openclipart.org/detail/175355/open-innovation-on> | <https://openclipart.org/detail/185914/scientist-with-beaker>
  9. 9. “Citations, according to the conventional wisdom, are the glue that binds a research paper to the body of knowledge in a particular field and a measure of the paper's importance. So what fraction of the world's vast scientific literature is cited at least once? Seventy percent? Eighty percent? Guess again.” David P. Hamilton. Publishing by -- and for? -- the Numbers. Science, 250:1331-2, 1990. Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/110257/citation-needed> Why would you want to rewrite your abstract?
  10. 10. David P. Hamilton. Publishing by -- and for? -- the Numbers. Science, 250:1331-2, 1990. Why would you want to rewrite your abstract?
  11. 11. David P. Hamilton. Publishing by -- and for? -- the Numbers. Science, 250:1331-2, 1990. Why would you want to rewrite your abstract?
  12. 12. "The conventional wisdom in the field is that 10% of the journals get 90% of the citations," says Pendlebury. "These are the journals that get read, cited, and have an impact." David P. Hamilton. Publishing by -- and for? -- the Numbers. Science, 250:1331-2, 1990. Why would you want to rewrite your abstract? The Rest Most cited journal list: http://www.scimagojr. com/journalrank.php
  13. 13. Why would you want to rewrite your abstract? The Rest WHY?
  14. 14. “We find that the Journal Impact Factor has a larger effect on the citation impact than the quality.” Bornmann L, Leydesdorff L. Does quality and content matter for citedness? A comparison with para-textual factors and over time. Journal of Informetrics 9(3) 2015:419-429. “The citedness of journal articles thus does not seem to be detectably influenced by the status of the journal in which they are published.” Seglen PO. Causal Relationship between Article Citedness and Journal Impact. Journal of the American Society for Information Science; New York, N.Y. Vol. 45, Iss. 1, (Jan 1, 1994): 1. Caveats Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/271641/quality-vs-quan tity>
  15. 15. Charles A. Schwartz. The Rise and Fall of Uncitedness. College & Research Libraries, January 1997, 19-29. Uncitedness Rates No Disaggregation Articles Only Physical Sciences 47% 22% Social Sciences 75% 48% Humanities 98% 93% Caveats LIFE SCIENCES
  16. 16. Caveats “The relationship between research quality and citation frequency probably takes the form of a J‐shaped curve, with exceedingly bad research cited more frequently than mediocre research (e.g. as an example of an idea or line of research that turned out to be a blind alley, or as an example of what not to do in a particular area).” Nicolaisen J. "The J‐shaped distribution of citedness." Journal of Documentation 2002 58(4):383-395. Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/266093/Science-Clipart-3>
  17. 17. Why would you want to rewrite your abstract? Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/219181/impact> <https://openclipart.org/detail/293410/big-bag-of-cash> | <https://openclipart.org/detail/175355/open-innovation-on> | <https://openclipart.org/detail/185914/scientist-with-beaker>
  18. 18. Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/110257/citation-needed> Why would you want to rewrite your abstract?
  19. 19. What’s hot, what’s not
  20. 20. What would a sexy abstract look like? Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/102247/twofisted-professor>
  21. 21. What would a (more) citable abstract look like? Image credits: <https://www.journals.elsevier.com/neuroimage/news/ most-cited-articles-in-2017>
  22. 22. What would a (more) citable abstract look like? Image credits: <https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pi i/S105381191600210X>
  23. 23. What would a (more) citable abstract look like? Image credits: <https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pi i/S105381191600210X>
  24. 24. Image credits: <https://twitter.com/NEJM/status/968970361760112642> What would a (more) citable abstract look like?
  25. 25. Before you start
  26. 26. Who is your primary audience? Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/232921/scientist-with-hand-in-pocket> | <https://openclipart.org/detail/216555/scientist-with-purple-hair>
  27. 27. Who is your secondary audience? Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/22743/doctor-examining-a-patient> | <https://openclipart.org/detail/181617/insurance-umbrella> | <https://openclipart.org/detail/7868/us-capitol-building-drawing>
  28. 28. Who is the audience for the abstract? A lot more people than you’ve been thinking about
  29. 29. Who is the audience for the abstract? “This is important, because the abstract is all that many people see,” wrote Loder. “The information it contains about the study helps people decide if they should retrieve the full article.”
  30. 30. Who is publishing the article? What are their rules for abstracts? Is the journal open or closed? What is their target audience? How different or similar is it to your ideal audience? Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/201542/theater-audience>
  31. 31. Planning strategy
  32. 32. What are the most important ideas? Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/35149/jon-phillips -notepad-idea-session-1>
  33. 33. … for which audience? Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/222289/bright-idea> <https://openclipart.org/detail/244714/brainstorming>
  34. 34. What are the most common words for them? Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/226080/search-engine-optimization-word-cloud-typography>
  35. 35. What are the MeSH Terms for those concepts? Image credits: <https://www.flickr.com/photos/rosefirerising/ 3314010233>
  36. 36. Let’s find out … Image credits: <https://openclipart.org/detail/237029/Seek-a nd-you-will-find-photocopy>
  37. 37. Let’s do it!
  38. 38. Start in Pubmed
  39. 39. Start in Pubmed
  40. 40. Go to the MeSH Database
  41. 41. Example: Osteogenesis
  42. 42. Example: Osteogenesis
  43. 43. Example: Osteogenesis
  44. 44. MeSH Browser https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/MBrowser.html
  45. 45. More about MeSH https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
  46. 46. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/authors.html
  47. 47. We Like to Help The NLM is not able to provide individual assistance in selecting keywords for journal articles; individual, personalized assistance should be sought from your local medical library. <https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/authors.html>
  48. 48. MeSH on Demand <https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mes h/MeSHonDemand.html>
  49. 49. Yale MeSH Analyzer <http://mesh.med.yale.edu/h elp>
  50. 50. Go Pubmed <http://www.gopubmed.com/>
  51. 51. Plain Language Abstracts AGU: Creating a Plain Language Summary <https://sharingscience.agu.org/creating-plain-language-summary/> AGU: The Value of a Plain Language Abstract <http://blogs.agu.org/sciencecommunication/2016/09/12/value-plain-language-abstract/> Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research: Plain Language Summary Tool <http://ktdrr.org/resources/plst/> Chris Buddle: A guide for writing plain language summaries of research papers <https://arthropodecology.com/2013/08/01/a-guide-for-writing-plain-language-summarie s-of-research-papers/> Cochrane Collaboration: Standards for the reporting of Plain Language Summaries <http://methods.cochrane.org/sites/default/files/public/uploads/PLEACS_0.pdf>
  52. 52. Visual Abstracts Components of an Effective Visual Abstract <https://www.surgeryredesign .com/resources> Visual Abstracts — Thoughts from a Medical Librarian <https://etechlib.wordpress.co m/2017/03/14/visual-abstracts- thoughts-from-a-medical-librar ian/>
  53. 53. Visual Abstract Example
  54. 54. More on Science Communication UM: ● R.E.L.A.T.E. (Researchers Expanding Lay-Audience Teaching and Engagement): https://www.learntorelate.org/ (Twitter: @RELATEatUM) ● Science Communication Fellow: https://lsa.umich.edu/ummnh/faculty-students/u-m-faculty/science-communication-fellows.html Beyond: ● Altmetric: https://www.altmetric.com/case-studies/ ● Science communication: could you explain it to your granny? 2014. https://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2014/oct/10/science-communicators-quantum-physics-gra nny ● Science communication: What it takes. Nature 2017. http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2017/02/10/science-communication-what-it-takes/ ● Scientific writing: A very short cheat sheet. Nature 2016. http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2016/10/28/scientific-writing-a-very-short-cheat-sheet/
  55. 55. Contact PF Anderson @pfanderson <pfa@umich.edu>

×