Presentation Re Victimization

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Presentation Re Victimization

  1. 1. Re-victimization patterns in a national longitudinal sample of children and youth DAVID FINKELHOR, RICHARD K. ORMROD, HEATHER A. TURNER Reviewed by Nina Bersabal & Amanda Gegor October 28, 2008 PSYC 308 UMBC
  2. 2. background <ul><li>Definitions of re-victimization </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Connection between childhood victimization and adult victimization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repeat victimization (two victimizations occurring in closer proximity) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recurrence of episode of child maltreatment typically at hands of same perpetrator </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Additions for this article </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Considering victimization broadly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Victimization is ongoing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How individuals escape re-victimization </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. introducdtion <ul><li>Objective: To understand persistent victimization for children from one year to the next </li></ul><ul><li>Key Questions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased likelihood to be victimized again? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does one sort increase victimization for another sort? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are highly victimized youth in one year vulnerable to re-victimization? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Risk factors and resilience factors? </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Methods <ul><li>National sample of 1467 children </li></ul><ul><li>Age 2 – 17 </li></ul><ul><li>Recruited through random digit dialing </li></ul><ul><li>Assessed vial telephone interviews (caretakers and youth) </li></ul><ul><li>Asked about comprehensive range of victimization experiences in previous year </li></ul><ul><li>Re-assessed after one-year interval </li></ul>
  5. 5. measurement <ul><li>Victimization </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Provides description of 34 offenses that cover five general areas </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple victimizations defined as victimizations of a different type occurring as part of a separate incident </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Poly-victims” were identified as children with four or more different types of victimization within the same year) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Possible Predictor Variables </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Personal, household, and location factors, life events, trauma symptoms, etc. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Table 1: Victimization rates, re-victimization, and desisting in a national sample of children followed for 2 years Aggregate Victimization Type Victimzation Rate (%) Risk of re-victimization Re-victimized (%) Desisted (%) New victims (%) Year 1 Year 2 Physical assault 55 49 2.2 65 35 27 Peer/sibling V 61 52 2.2 66 34 23 Sexual V 8 8 6.9 39 62 61 Maltreat-ment 14 10 6.7 36 64 49 Witness/indirect V 38 33 3.6 60 40 32 Poly-V 23 17 5.1 46 54 40
  7. 7. Table 2: re-victimization across different types of victimization Year 2 V Year 1 V Physical Assault Peer/sibling V Sexual V Maltreat-ment Witness/indirect V Poly-V Physical Assault 2.2 2.1 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.8 Peer/sibling V 2.1 2.2 3.2 3.1 1.6 3.8 Sexual V 1.2 1.1 6.9 3.7 2.1 3.3 Maltreat-ment 1.3 1.2 4.3 6.7 1.6 3.5 Witness/indirect V 1.7 1.2 6.4 3.3 3.6 5.2 Poly-V 1.6 1.5 6.8 4.3 2.4 5.1
  8. 8. results <ul><li>Risk for re-victimization high </li></ul><ul><li>Any one type left substantial vulnerability even for different types of subsequent re-victimization </li></ul><ul><li>“ Poly-victims” were at particularly high risk of persistent poly-victimization </li></ul><ul><li>Persistent poly-victimization   high scores on anger/aggression scores and recent life adversities </li></ul><ul><li>Desistent poly-victimization   having more good friends </li></ul><ul><li>Onset of poly-victimization   violent or maltreating families, family problems, and family disruptions </li></ul><ul><li>Older sibling = both risk and protective factor for different age group </li></ul><ul><li>CONCLUSION: Children suffer from considerable burden of victimization that is both diverse and repetitive </li></ul>
  9. 9. discussion <ul><li>Reconfirms children suffer high quantities of different sorts of victimization </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasizes such victimizations have very high likelihood of persisting </li></ul><ul><li>May be generalized causal pathways to explain re-victimization </li></ul><ul><li>Didn’t identify any other positive desistence factors except for social network/support </li></ul><ul><li>Start earlier and longer longitudinal study </li></ul>
  10. 10. references <ul><ul><li>Finkelhor, David, Richard K. Ormrod & Heather A. Turner. (2007). Re-victimization patterns in a national longitudinal sample of children and youth. Child Abuse & Neglect . 31, 479 – 502. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Miller-Perrin, Cindy & R. D. Perrin. (2006). Child Maltreatment . Second edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. </li></ul></ul>

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