2022

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A look at the Future of Communication Technology using 3 theories of communication technology.

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  • 2022

    1. 1. The Future2022
    2. 2. The FutureIn 2022 we will go from a semi connected world,to a fully connected world.Everything will be integrated to one anotherthrough various networks.Widespread wireless networks will connecteveryone to the internet from anywhere.
    3. 3. THE DIGITAL LIVING ROOM
    4. 4. The Digital Living RoomThe biggest change in 2022 will be the living room.By 2022 our televisions, game consoles, and cellphones will all be connected to one another.95% of all electronics will have wi-fi capability,allowing them to connect to other devices.
    5. 5. TVIn 2022 the television will be fully integrated to theinternet.Blu-Ray and DVD players will be obsolete.Any content the user wants, can be found on theinternet via the television.Users will also be able to make video calls throughthe television using devices such as the Kinect.
    6. 6. TV cont..The television will also be linked to the users cellphone.TV’s will have the ability to be programmed by acell phone from any location.The TV will also serve as an additional computer,allowing users to “Share the Screen” with theirwireless device allowing them to take advantageof the larger screen.
    7. 7. Video GamesVideo Games will become more social.Video Game networks will be the second leadinginternet based matchmaking site.Video Games will also have the ability to matchyou with people with your exact likes and dislikesbased upon your social network profile.
    8. 8. Video Games cont..Users will have the ability to play a game on theconsole, and immediately pick up where they leftoff on their mobile device.The video game console itself will be able todetect which user is playing and adjust itselfaccording to that users’ preferences.
    9. 9. The Cell PhoneThe cell phone will have the ability to controleverything.Your TV, Video Game console, your thermostat,lights, etc will all be controlled using your cellphone.The cell phone will be the only option for voicecommunication. Landlines will cease to exist.
    10. 10. The Cell Phone cont..Anytime a household device has accomplishedsomething, you will get an update on your phone,for example: If your oven is done preheating, youget a notification. If your washing machine hasfinished its cycle, you get a notification. If yourvehicle has reached a certain mileage, you will geta notification that you need an oil change.
    11. 11. The UmbrellaPerspectiveThe UmbrellaPerspective onCommunicationTechnology is a way tounderstand technology.
    12. 12. Umbrella Perspectivecont..The Umbrella Perspective breaks CommunicationTechnology into 5 parts: The Social System, TheOrganizational Infrastructure, Hardware, Software,and the User.All 5 parts helps us understand a givencommunication technology.
    13. 13. Umbrella Perspectivecont..One way in which the Umbrella Perspective will shape the future is the cellphone. At the top of the Umbrella is the Social System. The social system inthis case is the government, which by 2022 will have eliminated all landlines in favor of a National network of wireless carriers.Another way the Umbrella Perspective affects cell phones is Hardware. By2022 the integrity of cell phones and their towers, will make the old andoutdated landlines obsolete.Yet another example is the Organizational Infrastructure. By 2022 landlinephone carriers will have very few customers, costing them more money justto provide service, forcing them to ultimately shut off service to thelandlines.
    14. 14. Critical Mass TheoryThe Critical Mass Theory explains the point atwhich a Communication Technology reacheswidespread adoption.“There have to be some innovators and earlyadopters who are willing to take the risk to try anew interactive technology. These users are the‘critical mass,’ a small segment os the populationthat chooses to make contributions to the publicgood.” (Markus,1987)
    15. 15. Critical Mass cont..In this instance, the Critical Mass Theory helps explainwhy the Television will become fully integrated.Right now (2012) devices such as Apple TV andGoogle TV are not widely popular. But those devicesobviously signal things to come.The Critical Mass theory explains, that once thesedevices really catch on, they will become the norm inthe future.
    16. 16. The Principle of RelativeConstancy.The Principle of Relative Constancy says thatpeople use a fraction of their disposable incomeon mass media over time.In the future, people will take the extra money theyhave that they normally spend on Blu Rays, DVD’sand such, and allocate that toward a fasterbroadband connection, or to a subscription toNetflix.
    17. 17. Conclusion Using the the three theories, one can see how the future of CommunicationTechnology will evolve.The Living Room is destined to be wirelessly connected.The Television will become the wireless entertainment “Hub.”The Video Game Console will become the new Social Network.The Cell Phone will control it all.
    18. 18. Sources"The Future of TV: Learn How You Can Protect the Future of Free, LocalTelevision and Keep the News, Emergency Information and HD ProgramsYou Love." The Future of TV. Web. 24 Apr. 2012. <http://www.thefutureoftv.org>."Featured in Social Media." Mashable. Web. 24 Apr. 2012. <http://mashable.com/2012/04/04/predictions-digital-future/>.http://www.pbs.org/kcts/videogamerevolution/impact/future.htmlHunt, Josh. "The Future of Mobile / Cell Phones." The Futurist. Web. 24 Apr.2012. <http://thefuturist.co/the-future-of-mobile-cell-phones>.Markus, M. (1987, October). Toward a “critical mass” theory of interactivemedia. Communication Research, 14(5), 497-511

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