Solar Decathlon: Team Hawaii

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UHM's Team Hawaii talks about their design for a net-zero home that will be built and entered into the international Solar Decathlon. Slides from the REIS seminar series at the University of Hawaii at Manoa on 2010-10-21.

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  • United States
    Belgium
    Canada
    China
    New Zealand
    China
  • The website is actually part of the overall event: it’s part of the “Communications” Contest – and there are 9 others which are also judged.. Hence, “DECATHLON”

    The team with the most points, out of 1,000 possible points, at the end of the competition wins.
    The winning team produces a house that:
    • Is cost-effective, attractive, and easy to live in
    • Maintains comfortable and healthy indoor environmental conditions
    • Supplies energy to household appliances for cooking, cleaning, and entertainment
    • Provides adequate hot water
    • Balances energy production and consumption.
  • Undulating tubular section for maximizing daylighting and directing passive ventilation; the interior envelop is also activated with a sense of spatial drama, such that the lower ceiling promotes a feeling of intimacy and comfort, whereas the lofted ceiling allows for more open, aspirational quality; the floor level is in fact smooth and constant, a condition prescribed by the competition rules (all public circulation paths must be ADA compliant)
  • Natural daylighting

    “Lives” easily with natural environment

    Employs indoor/outdoor living spaces

    Minimum materials

    No heating or cooling required

    Independent of an oil-dependent electrical grid


    Materials
    Termites
    Rot
    Mold
    Corrosion


    Structure
    High winds
    Rainstorms
    Flooding (floatable)
  • General circulation description:
    Enter along promenade ramp, and repose in the shaded sitting deck;
    A foreshortened porch indicates the entry door, which is a track-mounted pivotable glass assembly with thermally-broken aluminum frame
    The largest space is the living / dining area, with open access to the
    Prefabricated kitchen / service module, which shares a plumbing wall with the bathroom facilities;
    We anticipate this module to be assemebled from two parts, using stainless steel
  • For a long time, we studied the possibility of fabricating a monocoque shell-structure;

    Is everyone familiar with what a monocoque is? It’s a essentially where the structure and form are basically one and the same, similar to the fuselage of an aircraft, or a racing shell in competitve rowing; the advantages being structural rigidity, combined with lightweight materials (factors which translate to benefits in transportation and handling costs, speed and ease of contruction, and the most efficient use of materials.

    In consultation with several firms, including Arup, the international engineering firm, and Kreysler, a composites manufacturing company, we arrived at
  • Virginia clematis
  • Take advantage of the nitrogen cycle to create a nearly closed ecosystem. Could potentially create fish fruit and vegetables for eating. In our house, the hydroponics will be only for fresh air generation.
  • There are 3 globally available and difficult to kill house plants that can grow all the fresh air you need. This will allow us to recirculate most of the air internally to the house instead of pulling air in from the outside and reconditioning it. The hope is to increase the thermal efficiency of the house’s heating cooling and humidity systems.
  • Natural daylighting

    “Lives” easily with natural environment

    Employs indoor/outdoor living spaces

    Minimum materials

    No heating or cooling required

    Independent of an oil-dependent electrical grid


    Materials
    Termites
    Rot
    Mold
    Corrosion


    Structure
    High winds
    Rainstorms
    Flooding (floatable)
  • Solar Decathlon: Team Hawaii

    1. 1. Team Hawaii U.S. Department of Energy | College of Engineering | School of Architecture | College of Engineering | College of Engineering Justin Carland, Project Manager David Cook, Project Engineer Tyler Phillips, Mechanical Engineer Ryan Nakamitsu, Mechanical Team
    2. 2. Solar Decathlon 2009 2 FlickR.com – Solar Decathlon Photostream
    3. 3. Solar Decathlon 2009 3
    4. 4.  asdf 4
    5. 5.  asdf 5
    6. 6.  asdf 6
    7. 7. 7 www.twitter.com/teamhawaii2011
    8. 8. Solar Decathlon 2011 8
    9. 9.  asdf 9 Interdisciplinary + Intercollegiate
    10. 10. 10 Interdisciplinary + Intercollegiate
    11. 11. 11 Solar Decathlon : 10 Competitions 1. Architecture 2. Market Appeal 3. Engineering 4. Communications 5. Affordability 6. Comfort Zone 7. Hot Water 8. Appliances 9. Home Entertainment 10. Energy Balance
    12. 12. Solutions forTropical Housing  Blends with natural environment  Provides natural daylight  Indoor/outdoor living spaces  Minimal materials required  No heating or cooling required  “Off the Grid” 12
    13. 13. Solutions forTropical Housing  Material  Termites  Rot  Mold  Corrosion  Structure  High winds  Rainstorms  Flooding (floatable) 13
    14. 14. 14 Conceptual Design drawing by B.S. Cho
    15. 15. 15 Conceptual Design drawing by D. Rockwood
    16. 16. 16 Floor Plan drawing by H.J. Yang
    17. 17. 17 Section H.J. Yang
    18. 18. 18 Shell Construction H.J. Yang
    19. 19. 19 Ribs + Shell + Wire|Mesh Skin
    20. 20. 20 Connection Details
    21. 21. 21 Ramp Approach H.J. Yang
    22. 22. 22 Living Envelope : Vegetative Shading H.J. Yang
    23. 23. 23 Shipping & Assembly – Construction / Logistics J.P. Soriano
    24. 24. 24 6 of: 40’ Containers 39’-5”x 7’-8” x 8’-10” J.P. Soriano Shipping & Assembly – Construction / Logistics
    25. 25. 6-7 1 2-3 3 4-5 25 7-Day Component Assembly H.J. Yang
    26. 26.  Translucency + High R-Value  www. lifewithoutbuildings.net26 Aerogel
    27. 27.  www.treehugger.com Fiberglass rigid panel Fiberglass batts Foam Insulation (Soy-based) Expanded Polystyrene (XPS) Closed-cell Polyurethane Spray Foam FRP Panels Aerogel 2.5 3.5 3.5 5.5 6.5 7.0 9.0 27 Aerogel : R-Value/in.
    28. 28. 28 CFD Analysis Air Circulation
    29. 29. 29
    30. 30. 30
    31. 31. 31
    32. 32. 32
    33. 33. 33
    34. 34. 34
    35. 35. 35 Phase Change Material (PCM)  - a substance with a high heat of fusion which, melting and solidifying at a certain temperature, is capable of storing and releasing large amounts of energy. Heat is absorbed or released when the material changes from solid to liquid and vice versa; thus, PCMs are classified as latent heat storage units. Cooling load: 620,000 BTU
    36. 36. 36
    37. 37. 37
    38. 38. 38
    39. 39. 39
    40. 40. 40
    41. 41. 41 Photovoltaic Cells – AC Power Distribution
    42. 42. Aquaponics
    43. 43. Compost 43
    44. 44. Fish Food 44
    45. 45. Self-Sustaining 45
    46. 46. Off Grid 46
    47. 47. 4 Shoulder Height 6 to 8Waist Height 1 Full Size Fresh Air Plants
    48. 48. Lighting 48
    49. 49. 49 House Controls
    50. 50. 50 Translucent Shell
    51. 51. 51 ‘Natural’ Space
    52. 52. 52 Team Hawaii Solar Decathlon 2011
    53. 53. 53 Team Hawaii Solar Decathlon 2011
    54. 54. 54 Team Hawaii Solar Decathlon 2011
    55. 55. 55 Team Hawaii Solar Decathlon 2011
    56. 56. 56 Team Hawaii Solar Decathlon 2011
    57. 57. 57 Go Team Hawaii !!

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