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The Key Changes in Marketing Communikation SIBE Lecture 150710

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How has marketing changed over the past 10 years?
New media and new purchase behaviour have changed marketing fundamentally.
What's new and why?
This slideset is an introductory lecture into these changes.
It aims at helping students and marketeers to understand the logic behind the changes, so they can make sense of them as they continue to occure in the future.

The slides focus on:
Marketing Today: the new Buying Decision Process
How to Segment a Market
Buyer/User-Typologies
Niche Markets
Positioning
Content Marketing
Why is Product Marketing Changing?
Customer Touch Points

Published in: Business
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The Key Changes in Marketing Communikation SIBE Lecture 150710

  1. 1. 1 von EndSeitenzahl Principles of Marketing/ E-marketing & E-business/ Marketing and Sales Management Day 1: Principles of Marketing / Marketing and Sales Management SIBE-Management-Master Dr. Ute Hillmer © 2015 School of International Business and Entrepreneurship (SIBE) der Steinbeis-Hochschule Berlin I www.steinbeis-sibe.de I Dr. Ute Hillmer
  2. 2. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Key Elements of Marketing Communication in an Online/Offline World
  3. 3. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer WHO is Dr. Ute Hillmer? anexpertinpositioningandpromotingtechnology products,withacarvingforinnovativeproductsthat arenotself-explaining. Withsuchproducts,humanbehaviorisoftenoutsidethe boundariesofrationality-despiteitseconomiccontext. Buyingbehaviorisheretypicallyaresultofsocial,cognitive andemotionalfactors,alongwiththeeconomicones.
  4. 4. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer What did Ute do? • 27 years of international marketing (HP, CoCreate, MFG Innovation Agency State of BW, Better Reality Marketing) • Dissertation in business administration, behavioral economics in technology marketing: Technology Acceptance in Mechatronics • Worldwide company and product communication; mainly 3 continents (America, Europe, Asia) • Product-, program-, channel-, partner marketing, marketing communication, branding, positioning • Responsible for operative, strategic + corporate marketing, branding, sales training • Experienced in large corporations, SMEs and freelance work as well as political institutions. • Responsible for the first international website of Hewlett Packard in 1993
  5. 5. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer What’s Ute’s STORY?Iaminbusinesstochange thelivesofmytechnology clients bygivingpurposeto theirwork!
  6. 6. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer and turn their customers into raving fans!
  7. 7. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Agenda1. Background and Reframe 2. Marketing Today: the new Buying Decision Process 3. How to Segment a Market 4. Buyer/User-Typologies 5. Niche Markets 6. Positioning 7. Content Marketing 8. Why is Product Marketing Changing? 9. Customer Touch Points
  8. 8. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Marketing Today: the New Buying Decision Process
  9. 9. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer TheAim of Marketing Marketing aims to influence the buyer and buying center at the moment and place when they are most open to influences towards a brand choice and buying decision.
  10. 10. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Funnel-Metaphor for a Buying Decision active evaluation many brands Grafik close to Edelman 2010, p.65 buying decision Initial considerationTrigger lesser and lesser brands
  11. 11. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Digitally supported Buying Decision active Evaluation Post-Sales Experience Enlarged Evaluation Ambassador Loyalty Loop Active Evaluation Model close to Edelman 2010, p.65 Moment of Purchase Initial Consideration Trigger
  12. 12. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer The Core Changes 1. Consumers and buyers connect with brands in fundamentally new ways – often beyond manufacturers or dealers' control 2. They evaluate a shifting array of options during the evaluation process and remain engaged with the brand after purchase
  13. 13. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer 2014 B2B Buyer Behavior Survey • Web search is the top source of information • B2B buyers strategically browse social media • The number of sources used to research and evaluate purchase has increased • There is an increased awareness of purchase options • The evaluation process is longer and more satisfying DemandGen Report Survey 2014
  14. 14. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Key Information Sources The 2014 B2B Buyer Behaviour Survey
  15. 15. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer What Role does Social Media Play? The 2014 B2B Buyer Behaviour Survey
  16. 16. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer The core ingredients to influence a consumer or buyer are ?
  17. 17. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer How to Segment a Market?
  18. 18. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer What is Market Segmentation? Market segmentation divides a broad target market into subsets of consumers, businesses, or countries who have, or are perceived to have, common needs, interests, and priorities. Segmentation is used to identify and further define the target customers. How have Market Segments changed over the last 50 years?
  19. 19. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Common Ways to Segment a Market Geographic Segmentation according to geographic criteria—nations, states, regions, countries, cities, neighborhoods, or postal codes. Demographic Segmentation based on variables such as age, gender, occupation and education level or according to perceived benefits which a product/service may provide. Speciality: ‘firmographic’ or ‘feature based’ segmentation, commonly used in B2B: segmentation based on features such as company size (revenue or number of employees), industry sector, location (country and/or region). Behavioral Segmentation divides consumers into groups according to their knowledge of, attitude towards, usage rate, response, loyalty status, and readiness stage to a product. Behavioral segmentation divides buyers into segments based on their knowledge, attitudes, uses, or responses concerning a product. A good starting point for market segmentation! Psychographic Segmentation (Lifestyle) measured by studying activities, interests, and opinions (AIOs) of customers. It considers how people spend their time and which external influences they are most responsive to /influenced by. Psychographic identifies the personal activities and targeted lifestyle the target subject endures, or the image they are attempting to project. Mass Media has a predominant influence and effect on Psychographic segmentation. Segmentation can take place according to benefits sought by the consumer/customer. Cultural Segmentation used to classify markets according to cultural origin.
  20. 20. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Why to Segment a Market?
  21. 21. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer How to SegmentYourTargetMarket? Sinusmilieu
  22. 22. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer How to SegmentYourTargetMarket? NielsengebietenachACNielsen
  23. 23. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer How to SegmentYourTargetMarket? GenderandAge
  24. 24. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer How to Segment Your Target Market?
  25. 25. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Select your Segmentation Criteria Measurability • “otherwise the scheme will not be operational” • next to impossible in some markets, hard in most markets => most companies to use more qualitative and intuitive methods Substantiality • “the variable should be relevant to a substantial group of customers” • Challenge: find the right size / balance: large group segment: risk of diluting effectiveness • Too small: you lose the benefits of economies of scale. • Sometime one large customer Operational relevance • Segmentation should enable to offer the suitable product/service to the chosen segment, e.g. faster delivery service, special 24-hour technical support, etc. Quelle: Webster, 2003
  26. 26. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Why do certain innovations diffuse much faster than others? Example: Take the Market of DisruptiveInnovations
  27. 27. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer New Innovations usually … change the way how we do things... and we go along happily and fast or not so fast ...
  28. 28. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Successful (B2B) marketing is… • about segmenting customer experiences to fit the product life cycle and the typical customer profile • about developing and maintaining trust – matching the different customer segments need • about initiating a customer centric dialog that takes the different customer profiles into consideration Behavioral economics!
  29. 29. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Behavioural Economics Behavioral economics … study the effects of social, cognitive and emotional factors on the economic decisions of individuals and institutions and the consequences for market prices, returns and the resource allocation. The fields are primarily concerned with the bounds of rationality of economic agents. Behavioral models typically integrate insights from psychology with neo- classical economic theory. In so doing they cover a range of concepts, methods, and fields.[1] Behavioral analysts are not only concerned with the effects of market decisions but also with public choice, which describes another source of economic decisions with related biases towards promoting self-interest. [1] The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics
  30. 30. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer User- Typologies
  31. 31. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer “Innovativeness” = degree to which an individual or a unit is relatively earlier in adopting new technologies than other members of a system Source: Rogers Diffusion of Innovation 1995
  32. 32. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Time Marketsize Rogers Diffusion of Innovation 1995 an idealized technology product lifecycle Continuous Innovation Disruptive Innovation Laggards 16% Late Majority 34% Early Adopters 13,5% Early Majority 34% Innovators 2,5%
  33. 33. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Time Marketsize Time Marketsize Time Marketsize Rogers Diffusion of Innovation 1995 Moore; Crossing the Chasm 1999. diffusion of innovation varies…
  34. 34. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Time Marketsize technology life cycle and its buyer categories Laggards 16% Late Majority 34% Early Adopters 13,5% Early Majority 34% Innovators 2,5% Chart based on Rogers 1995, p. 262 and Moore 1999, p. 12
  35. 35. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer LaggardsLate Majority Early Adopters Early Majority Innovators mainstream behaviour Increasingly conforming behaviour Hillmer, Technology Acceptance in Mechatronics, 2009. Zeit Marktgröße
  36. 36. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer LaggardsLate Majority Early Adopters Early Majority Innovators individualistic behaviour Increasingly individualistic behaviour Hillmer, Technology Acceptance in Mechatronics, 2009. Zeit Marktgröße
  37. 37. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Inventors: Techies Technologyistheirlife Technology - Crazy – Spend hours to get the product to work – Do everything to help the product – Technology should be for free Forgiving souls – Don’t mind lousy documentation and weird procedures to achieve functionality – Want technology first – no need for a sales channel • Their role: they move technology forward but do not generate much diffusion + generate no income Moore; Crossing the Chasm 1999.
  38. 38. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Visionaries Technologyenthusiasticbusinessmen,drivenbyadream • Businessman first - driven to be the first - new technologies are used to serve their own strategic benefit - don’t want incremental but fundamental improvements - make business world aware of new technologies - not very price-sensitive, have project budget - live in the future - communicate with techies and other visionaries
  39. 39. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Visionaries (2) • Take a risk - love publicity - risky projects - start projects from ground up, don‘t want standards, want to develop them - buy by intuition (but may claim otherwise) - highly motivated, driven by a dream
  40. 40. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Visionaries (3) • Excellent communicators - charismatic; they fight for their project - like to serve as a reference - network with techies and pragmatists - too many references de-motivate visionaries - look for new ideas in communication with intelligent people • Their role: they fund the product development + give the innovation a “real” application
  41. 41. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Pragmatists Lookformeasurable,incrementalimprovement Driven by business results - improved productivity • Avoid risk - risk is a negative term - want to work with market leader/ established firms - look for product quality, support, consulting, good interfaces, reliability - want standards, “save buys” - need references - live in the present
  42. 42. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Pragmatists(2) Loyal customers • are interested in company they buy from • revenue and profit must grow steadily “stability” • communicate within company and industry • the first mass market Their role: They hold the key to the mass market BUT: you need to be established in order for them to buy from you but you don‘t get established until they buy from you ! ?
  43. 43. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Pragmatists (3) Consequences out of this profile • One really needs to be familiar with the processes and issues that worry the pragmatists  Offer a clear relative advantage to them
  44. 44. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Conservatives “Idon’thavetoliketheproduct,evenifIuseit” - They do what pragmatics do, but later - Invest in technology to keep up with competition - Have low technical competence
  45. 45. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Conservatives(2) - predictable - want everything faster, cheaper, improved - are price sensitive - like bundles, pre-installed solutions - “if it isn’t broken, don’t fix it” - very interested in service and support Their role: huge mass market
  46. 46. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Innovation Marketing – What role does engagement and dialog play? “
  47. 47. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer LaggardsLate Majority Early Adopters Early Majority Innovators early adopters = visionaries Time Marktsize
  48. 48. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer LaggardsLate Majority Early Adopters Early Majority Innovators early majority = pragmatists Time Marktsize
  49. 49. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer The Niche
  50. 50. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Time Marketsize technology life cycle and its buyer categories Laggards 16% Late Majority 34% Early Adopters 13,5% Early Majority 34% Innovators 2,5% Chart based on Rogers 1995, p. 262 and Moore 1999, p. 12
  51. 51. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Time Marketsize technology life cycle and “the gap” or: why you should focus Laggards 16% Late Majority 34% Early Adopters 13,5% Early Majority 34% Innovators 2,5% Chart based on Moor 1999
  52. 52. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Why to choose a niche target market Become a niche expert • learn to understand their urgent needs and biggest desires • know where to find them • align products and services to the needs in the niche • learn to speak their language • understand their processes • discover their networks and their media mix • built an effective network and communicate effectively • They will know you are committed to them Become #1 in the niche market
  53. 53. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Ways out of the niche Horizontal Expansion: • Sell more services to the same market Vertical Expansion: • Sell your services to more markets
  54. 54. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Positio- ning A Workshop Lecture
  55. 55. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer What is Positioning? Positioning defines where your product or service stands in relation to others offering similar products and services in the marketplace as well as the mind of the consumer. Positioning always starts with a “product” (merchandise, a service, a company, an institution, or even a person….) but positioning is not what you do to that product. Positioning is what you do to the mind of the prospect or customer. Positioning is the act of designing the company’s offering and image to occupy distinctive place in the mind of the target market. Kottler Keller
  56. 56. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer What is Positioning? Image by talk2frank from Stock.Xchng
  57. 57. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer What is Positioning good for? Position, differenciate and communicate Think from your customers perspective, before you talk to them #1 Relevance Is the promissed added value of relevance to your target segment? Does your customer care? #2 Differenciation Are you unique? Do you offer something „more“ that what your customers offer? #3 everybody and everywhere, the message is the same One core message from every employee + partner and through every channel
  58. 58. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Target Market . . . . .. . .
  59. 59. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Your Customer‘s Job Thetasksyour targetcustomer has(don‘tforgetthe buyingcenter) What urgent needs do they have? What are their Compelling desires? … … … …
  60. 60. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer What are the • largestwinsyoucan gainforourcustomer • thebiggestbenefit,customerscanobtain? • Biggestpainswecanofferrelieffor? …
  61. 61. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer The biggest result Determine the biggest result your customers get … it must be a big one! What is your big promise? People buy results and the benefits they get from these results
  62. 62. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Whenand how do you keepour promisses? When were your customers really happy? Why? What was the right fit? … …
  63. 63. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer What product(s) do we offer? …
  64. 64. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Our promise (1) We help… … …
  65. 65. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Our promise (2) What we help our customers do is: … … …
  66. 66. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Our promise (3) Why we do what we do to serve our customers: … Our Vision, what we hope to achieve: …
  67. 67. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Our Promise (4) How we differenciate from alternatives in the market …
  68. 68. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Positionierung: Value Proposition • Operative excellence • Produkt exzellence • Customer insight Youhaveachoice: economic benefits emotional benefits functional benefits
  69. 69. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Value Proposition We help … (do the following things) … in order to …
  70. 70. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Content- Marketing
  71. 71. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Content Marketing Def. Content marketing/custom media (sometimes called custom publishing, custom content, or branded content) is the creation and distribution of educational and/or compelling content in multiple formats to attract and/or retain customers.” Source: Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs
  72. 72. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Why Content Marketing The thinking behind it: is the belief that if businesses deliver consistent, helpful information to buyers at the right time, then prospects will ultimately reward the company with their purchase and loyalty. Content marketing equips buyers with the knowledge to make better- informed decisions. It is the reason why visitors go to your site.
  73. 73. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Content Marketing =Thought Leadership Content Marketing aims to create THOUGHT LEADERSHIP therefor CREDIBILITY is the magic ingredient
  74. 74. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Why is Content Marketing important? Average person is exposed to 5.000 ads / offers per day Buyers have tuned out marketing
  75. 75. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Think of anArt Gallery Where is the Art?
  76. 76. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer People come to see art, not empty frames or empty walls Content is the reason people go to your site
  77. 77. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Why Content Marketing ? 1. Position your company as a expert 2. Encourage your audience to consult you 3. Generate new leads 4. Progress existing leads 5. Built your database 6. Raise awareness 7. Contribute to communities 8. Give your sales team a reason to engage 9. Boost your search engine performance
  78. 78. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Importance of Content The 2014 B2B Buyer Behaviour Survey
  79. 79. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Starting Content Marketing Shift thinking from marketer to publisher 1. Define a critical group of buyers 2. Determine what info these prospects really need 3. Determine how prospects want to receive information 4. Deliver info for maximum impact on goals 5. Measure and recalibrate or in short: Stop shouting and make yourself useful!
  80. 80. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Stop shouting and make yourself useful! means 1. Consider the interest and the worldview of your target customer group (=> segmentation!) 2. Tell a compelling story for them
  81. 81. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Principles of Content Marketing 1. It‘s not about you Put your agenda aside and put your prospects agenda at the heart of your marketing 2. Pick a single, high –priority issue Pick a topic that matters to your audience and stick to it
  82. 82. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Principles of Content Marketing 3. Find some blue water Find an issue, that has not been beaten to death, if this is not possible, put it in context or look for a new perspective 4. Aim for a neutral tone of voice Don’t sell – there will be opportunities for selling, once trust has been built. You earn respect by not selling.
  83. 83. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Principles of Content Marketing 5. Support your story with data A strong story supported by credible data is irresistible. 6. Use your customers Real users have more credibility than you do. 7. Consider 3rd Party credibility Bringing in a recognized analyst can add credibility
  84. 84. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Media for Content Marketing
  85. 85. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Exkurse: Subjective Realities
  86. 86. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Subjective Construction of Reality Each individual sees the world through subjective lenses. Consider typical customer segments and try to capture them socially and emotionally with Seth Godin, All Marketeers tell stories, 2009 Mischel and Morf, Handbook of self and identity, 2003. Kelly, The psychology of personal constructs, 1991 YOUR STORY!
  87. 87. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Ein Fahrrad!
  88. 88. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Ein Fahrrad!
  89. 89. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Ein Fahrrad!
  90. 90. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Ein Fahrrad! Product
  91. 91. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Ein Fahrrad! ?? Bla bla ... Blub blub. .. Blob blob ... Blubber blubber.. .
  92. 92. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Content Marketing B2B vs. B2C - Informative or emotional? - facts or story? picture: Sunlab.de
  93. 93. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Address prospect emotionally, the degree of emotion depends on target market Offer facts and statistics that can be used further in combination with emotions. Wrap content is exciting, emotion-heavy storytelling. Awaken covetousness. B2B prospects love a good story, but there should be Facts and Information to support the storytelling. Target market is often multi-Layered e.g. supplement for sports-people: Pro- bodybuilder, beginner, endurance- Sportsmen, fat people, thin people, … More homogeneous, linear target markets with functionally diverse buying center B2C B2B Content Marketing B2C vs. B2B picture: Sunlab.de
  94. 94. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Social Media => Traffic => Conversions Social Media => Awareness =/= Conversions Social Media => Awareness => Trust Company size not relevant. Fullfillment of customer need dominates the decission Company must be seen as trust worthy and competent => trust and competence must be built via content. Emotional value added dominates Mixture of emotional and funktional value dominates Content Marketing B2C vs. B2B B2C B2B picture: Sunlab.de
  95. 95. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Content Marketing Challenges Source: B2B Content Marketing report 2012; Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs
  96. 96. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Best Practice „Talking“
  97. 97. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Produktplan, Business Model+ Marketing
  98. 98. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Product- Performance Product marketing und its role Technology Products Users want better services, higher performance Chart inspired by Norman 1999, S. 32 Product performance needs of an average user Unfulfilled needs Over-functionality; most users don‘t use the extended features Technology is „good enough“ and thus irrelevant. The user- experience is key. time Commodity Users want ease-of-use, reliability, low cost Beta Pure Funktion User Experience Version Care
  99. 99. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer TraditionalProductDevelopmentand theroleof ProductMarketing
  100. 100. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Why is Product Marketing changing?
  101. 101. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Why must ProductMarketingchange? 9 outof 10 productinnovationsarefailing Corporate giant or small star-up, low-tech or high tech, online or offline, 9 out of 10 new ideas fail because… our tools are optimized for execution Illustration copyright of Steve Blank, „The Startup Owners Manual“ With innovations, you need to be in search mode!
  102. 102. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer ATale of Fail
  103. 103. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Webvan: a tail of fail • A startup that promised delivery of groceries within 30 minutes of ordering, from state-of-the-art order fulfillment centers manned by advanced robots. • Launched 1999; • $10M, within 2 years $400M, raised; • 8.5 billion market capitalization on day of IPO • They had a compelling story, a great b-plan, a long list of features for SW, warehouse handling,… • Webvan executed as its board and investors asked • from launch to fail in 2 years perfectly on plan
  104. 104. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer One of the largest failures on record • Founded in 1991 by Motorola and a global partnership of 18 companies • Planned to built a mobile phone system that would work anywhere on earth • Purchased 15 rockets from Russia, U.S. and China, 72 private satellites were launched into orbit • 7 Years after launch, the infrastructure was in place; 9 Month after first call was made, the company was bankrupt.
  105. 105. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer “New Product Introduction Diagram” The model is a good fit for an exiting company where customers are known, the product features can be spect‘ed upfront, the market is well defined and competition is understood! Illustration copyright of Steve Blank, „The Startup Owners Manual“
  106. 106. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer “CustomerDevelopment” ansthe changing Roleof ProductMarketing Chart von Eric Ries: Lean Start up theleanstartup.com Idee Bauen Nutzer- Daten Lernen Produkt / Code Messen Hypothesen zu Fakten machen Ein skalierbares und wiederholbares Verkaufsmodell finden
  107. 107. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Customer Problem: known Product Features: known Illustration copyright of Steve Blank, „The Startup Owners Manual“ New: “CustomerDevelopment”and thechangingroleof Marketing
  108. 108. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Customer Discovery
  109. 109. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer ANewArea in Products and Channels Physical products through physical channels Virtual products through physical channels Illustration copyright of Steve Blank, „The Startup Owners Manual“
  110. 110. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Innovations-Management: Openby Design
  111. 111. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Customer- Touchpoints
  112. 112. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Research the Key CustomerTouch Points Ask the customer how they – Get information – Come to a decision – Order and purchase – Configure – Stay in touch – Use support – … Ask + watch your value chain How do they – Sell – Take orders – Make offers – Configure products or services – Communicate and engage – Do customer support – Stay in touch – Use support
  113. 113. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Awareness + Preference Decision Preparation / Pre-Sales Order + Purchase Production + Logistics After Sales + Support Touch-PointAnalysis • Ads • Google AdWords • Google Search • Banner • Website • E-Shop • Trade Shows • Sales • Press Information • Banner Ads • YouTube/FB/Xing • xxx recommends… • … • Sales • Sales back office • Trade shows • Customer visit • Offer • Price List • E-Shop • Configuration-Support • Catalog • Brochure • Image video • Vendor Website • … • eMail • Fax • Telephone • E-Shop • Vendor • … • Product • Packaging • User-Manual • CD • Short Brochure • Invoice • … • Installation-Support • Runtime-Support • Customer visit • In-house tradeshow • Newsletter • Product-Flyer • Brochure • Reference Customer Story • Customer-Event • Roadshow
  114. 114. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Informationsquellen #1 Internet #2 Messen #3 Fachzeitschriften #4 Blog Erstkontakt: Internetrecherche !! Informationsquellen/KommunikationderKunden Aktive Kontaktpunkte #1 schreiben Email / Telefon #2 gehen Online #3 „ich weiß was wir brauchen“ #4 „wir haben einen Rahmenvertrag“
  115. 115. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Internet Google Search Hersteller Webseite Webseite Blogs (aa) Informationsquellender Kunden Messen aa bb cc Fachzeitschriften ITK, PC, SW, Automationstechnik, Maschinenbau, Elektronik, Branchen FZ „Ich weiß nicht wie die heißen“: Markt&Technik, electronic, etz, ct, computer business, Computer Reseller News, Computer Woche, Linux Magazin, Industrie und Technik, Electronic Automation, Antriebstechnik xx wird nicht als Informationsquelle wahrgenommen
  116. 116. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Suggested Reading • Value Proposition Design by A. Osterwalder, Y.Pigneur • Groundswell by Charlene Li, Josh Bernoff • Positioning by Trout and Ries • In Pursuit of Wow! + The Tom Peters Seminar by Tom Peters • What would Google do by Jeff Jarvis • All Marketeers tell Stories by Seth Godin • 1 to 1 Marketing Future by Don Peppers • CRM at the Speed of light by Paul Greenberg • The Long Tail by Chris Anderson • The Wisdom of Crowds by James Surowiecki • Crossing the Chasm by Geoffery Moore • Selling the Dream by Guy Kawasaki
  117. 117. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  118. 118. July 2015 Dr. Ute Hillmer Dankeschön!
  119. 119. 206 von EndSeitenzahl HERZLICHEN DANK FÜR IHRE AUFMERKSAMKEIT! GIBT ES FRAGEN? © 2015 School of International Business and Entrepreneurship (SIBE) der Steinbeis-Hochschule Berlin I www.steinbeis-sibe.de I Dr. Ute Hillmer

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