Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Engaging the customer

1,043 views

Published on

Why engaging with the customer?
The Social Media Marketing Basics
Content Marketing for B2B
The SM Toolbox
Corporate Website
Corporate Blog
Social Networks
Content Sharing Platforms
Crowd Sourcing
Online Shops
Microblogging
Social CRM
Cases
Social Media Marketing in Practice

Published in: Business, News & Politics
  • Be the first to comment

Engaging the customer

  1. 1. New MarketingUnderstand, Embraceand Engage withYour CustomerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality MarketingReutlingen, 12.6.201212.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  2. 2. Content of the SM Marketing Lecture 1. Why engaging with the customer? 2. The Social Media Marketing Basics 3. Content Marketing for B2B 4. The SM Toolbox Corporate Website Crowd Sourcing Corporate Blog Online Shops Social Networks Microblogging Content Sharing Platforms Social CRM 5. Cases 6. Social Media Marketing in Practice12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  3. 3. Engaging with the Customer “Do I have to do this?”12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  4. 4. Why is Marketing Changing?Do I have to be in the Web 2.0, inSocial Media as a Company?Do I really have to be there as aB2B Company?12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  5. 5. Die12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  6. 6. Why is Marketing Changing? Because buyer behaviour is changing significantly!12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  7. 7. How did you buy yesterday?How do you buy today?How will you buy tomorrow? 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  8. 8. The Power of Recommendations:„I‘ll Have What She is Having“12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  9. 9. Change Engines on the Meta Level Technological Development • Digitalization • Visualisation tech. • Network technologies • Social Media • Converging media • Digital distribution • Storage technologies • Intellig. automation • … Social Development The mature human – the mature customer • Selfconfidence • Participation • Self-determination • Individualisation12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  10. 10. Changing Kommunication fromSender Receiver12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  11. 11. Changing Kommunication toSender Receiver12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  12. 12. From Product- to Customerfocus Product Customer Needs Price Customer Cost Place Convenience / Access Promotion CommunicationMcCarthy: Basic Marketing: A managerial approach, 1960Schullz, Stanley I. Tannenbaum, Robert F. Lauterborn, Integrated Marketing Communications, 1993 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  13. 13. Social Media –“Do I really have tobe there as aCompany? “12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  14. 14. It‘s not only the web 2.0 generation that isWarum sind Sie in Sozialen Netzen online(Europea Data)...to get to know things about(new) products / brands...to come in contact with brands /companies...to stimulate my career...to find other users of a certainbrand / product...to find promotions of a certainbrand / product...to become a famous person...to become an opinion leader12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Source: Social Media Around the World 2011, InSites Consulting
  15. 15. Customers + Web 2.0 Technologies12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  16. 16. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Social Media: Does it Pay Off? 1 http://www.experian.com/simmons‐ research/register‐2011‐social‐media‐consumer‐ trend‐report.html
  17. 17. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Social Media: Does it Pay Off? 2 http://www.experian.com/simmons‐ research/register‐2011‐social‐media‐consumer‐ trend‐report.html
  18. 18. Social Media: Does it Pay Off? 412.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  19. 19. They talk about you!• They do it with or without you … you should steer the direction best you can!• Dell Hell was a showcase starting point in 200512.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  20. 20. Dell Hell12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  21. 21. Dell Hell 2 “Obviously a lot of people are in the blogosphere  talking about their issues with Dell products, why aren’t  we doing anything about it?”  Michael Dell, 200612.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  22. 22. Dell 2006:“Obviously a lot of people are in the blogosphere talking about their issues with Dell products, why aren’t we doing anything about it?” Michael Dell, 2006 2011: Dell named “most social brand of 100 top brands”12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  23. 23. Targeted Customer Dialog12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  24. 24. Social Media – “Do I really have to be there as a B2B Company? “ 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  25. 25. Social MediaNot just for nurds12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  26. 26. How Social Media matters to B2B• Chief stakeholders may not be using social media. – but their lieutenants will• Social media is impacting how B2B decisions are being made. – Background research – Expertise – Search results impact12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  27. 27. Social Media and the Buying Process Post-sales user-exp. reports support+help complains learning upgrading Sales looking for the best dealPre-saleslooking for information12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  28. 28. Social Media and the buying process12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  29. 29. Customer Centric Business Model MarketingProduct/ServiceCustomerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 2005. T. Hannagan, Management: Concepts & Practices, 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer 19.12.2011
  30. 30. Development Steps in Marketing (Meffert, 2008 S. 8) Inhaltlicher Fokus des Marketings Netzwerk‐ orientierung Netzwerke Umwelt‐ orientierung Umwelt Wettbewerbs‐ Wett‐ orientierung bewerber Handels‐ Handel orientierung Verbraucher‐ Ver‐ orientierung braucher Distributions‐ Unter‐ orientierung nehmungAnspruchs‐ 1950‘er                 1960‘er                  1970‘er                 1980‘er                     1990‘er                 spektrum des  Zeit 2000‘er            Marketings 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  31. 31. Konvergenz des Mediensystems (Gläser 2010, S. 274) Traditionelle Trägermedien Traditionelle Übertragungsmedien UniversalmediumForm der  Text/ Bild        Ton         AV Ton         AV        Sprache       Daten      Multi‐ Text/Bild/Ton/ Kommunikation Sprache/AV/  media Daten/MultimediaMedium Film/ Fern‐ Telefon ‐ Daten ‐ Online ‐ Universalmedium Buch    Presse    Audio  Video Hörfunk  sehen dienste dienste  dienste Produktions‐ Verlag  Verlag Verlag Verlag Sender    Sender Dienst ‐ Dienst ‐ Dienst ‐ Universalmedium‐unternehmen leister leister leister unternehmenDistribution:  Terrestrische  Breitbandkabel Internet Satellit Telefonnetz Konvergente  Sender MobilfunkDatennetze Radio, TV, Pay‐per‐channel/view, Video‐on‐demand, Audio‐/Video‐Streaming, Internetdienst, Teleshopping,E‐MailKonsum: konvergente  Fernsehgerät PC Handy PrintKonsumgüter 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  32. 32. „Push“ Communication Agency  Media  Fulfillment Unique Products / OffersMarketer Customer / Messages and Incentives Prospect D. Schultz etDr. Ute Hillmer Customer-Brand Relationships , 2009, p. 5 12.6.2012 al., BuildingDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  33. 33. „Pull“ Communication Web Search Employees/Recommenders/Distributers/Influencers Agency  Media  Fulfillment Competitors Unique Products / Offers CompetitorsMarketer Customer/ Messages and Incentives Competitors Prospect Competitors Word‐of‐Mouth New Forms of Media D. Schultz etDr. Ute Hillmer Customer-Brand Relationships , 2009, p. 6 12.6.2012 al., BuildingDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  34. 34. 360° integrated Marketing Communication (Don Schulz 2009) Botschaft 360° Marketing‐ Kommunikation Kunde/  Media Community 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  35. 35. Changes in Marketing: The Marketing Funnel• Is the funnel still there? Attention Interest Preference Action 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  36. 36. 360° Medienmanagement Integriertes Markenkommunikationsmodell (Don Schulz 2009) Botschaft Kunde Media 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  37. 37. Product positioning process • Generally, the product positioning process involves: • Defining the market in which the product or brand will compete (who the relevant buyers are) • Identifying the attributes (also called dimensions) that define the product space • Collecting information from a sample of customers about their perceptions of each product on the relevant attributes • Determine each products share of mind • Determine each products current location in the product space • Determine the target markets preferred combination of attributes (referred to as an ideal vector) • Examine the fit between: – The position of your product – The position of the ideal vector12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  38. 38. Positioning concepts• More generally, there are three types of positioning concepts:• Functional positions – Solve problems – Provide benefits to customers – Get favorable perception by investors (stock profile) and lenders• Symbolic positions – Self-image enhancement – Ego identification – Belongingness and social meaningfulness – Affective fulfillment• Experiential positions – Provide sensory stimulation – Provide cognitive stimulation12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  39. 39. Social MediaBasicsWhat do I have to know andunderstand to get started?12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Dr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  40. 40. How to get started1. Stay focused on your objective• Define marketing goal• Define target markets• Which channel, which medium, which platform will help me reach my target? Be where your  customers are!!12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  41. 41. How to get started2. What do you intent to achieve?• Win additional customers • Increase communication with• Gain a new customer base customers• Increase sales • Increase website traffic• Increase awareness • Increase image• Enter new markets • Change image • Increase online reputation As with traditional marketing: set yourself realistic goals!12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  42. 42. How to get started3. Where are your customers having their conversations? “Lets spend a day in your customers media mix and learn to understand what they experience, how they feel, and most of all, how they communicate and interact. “ Kevin Colleran, Facebooks #1 Sales Rep12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  43. 43. “Spend a Day in yourCustomers Media Mix” “Lets spend a day in your customers media mix and learn to understand what they experience, how they feel, and most of all, how they communicate and interact. “ Kevin Colleran, Facebooks #212.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  44. 44. How to get started 4. The Content Relevance Benefit Entertainment12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  45. 45. How to get started5. Set Strategy + ProcessesAsk yourself• Where are my customers => What • Which social networks will be product(s) are suitable for social suitable? networks? • What reactions should I be• How do I position these products? prepared to get?• Does my CI and brand fit the online • How will I react to negative community? feedback from blogs, etc.?• How do I communicate online (tone • Do I communicate centralized and stile)? or distributed? You have no glue? Then have a look how your competitors do it!12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  46. 46. Social Media Marketing has an evergrowing Toolbox – Search Engines – Podcasts – Forums – YouTube – Blogs – Price Search Engines – Interest Groups – Rating Sites – Portals – Picture Galleries – Social Networks – … (Facebook, Twitter, Xing, LinkedIn, Spotify, Pinterest…)12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  47. 47. The Old Way: eMarketing and eCommerce Tools – eMail – Portals – Corporate Websites – … 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  48. 48. Social Media Marketing Trad. Media vs. Social Media Shouting vs. Sharing → additional Marketing Chanel(s) 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  49. 49. Consequences of Social Media Marketing for the Product Range “The Long Tail” • 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerChris Anderson: The Long Tail, 2006.  
  50. 50. Consequences of Social Media Marketingfor the Customer“The Cluetrain Manifesto (2001)”95 Theses Excerpt1. Markets are conversations.12. There are no secrets. The networked market knows more than companies do about their own products. And whether the news is good or bad, they tell everyone.17. Companies that assume online markets are the same markets that used to watch their ads on television are kidding themselves.18. Companies that dont realize their markets are now networked person-to-person, getting smarter as a result and deeply joined in conversation are missing their best opportunity.19. Companies can now communicate with their markets directly. If they blow it, it could be their last chance.21. Companies need to lighten up and take themselves less seriously. They need to get a sense of humor.12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  51. 51. Consequences of Social Media Marketing for the Customer “The Cluetrain Manifesto (2001)” • “These networked conversations are enabling powerful new forms of social organization and knowledge exchange to emerge. • As a result, markets are getting smarter, more informed, more organized. Participation in a networked market changes people fundamentally. • People in networked markets have figured out that they get far better information and support from one another than from vendors. So much for corporate rhetoric about adding value to commoditized products.”Levine , Locke, Searls ,Weinberger:The Cluetrain Manifesto: The End of Business as Usual, 2001. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  52. 52. Σ Social Media Basics#1 Built and maintain networks: THE SM TOOLBOX#2 Built credibility and trust, especially in B2B: CONTENT MARKETING#3 Be found by your target market: SEO + SMM12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  53. 53. Recap Social Media Basics • What was most important for you so far? Tell your neighbor to the right and left. • What open question emerged? • What is unclear?12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  54. 54. What isContentMarketing?Dr. Ute Hillmer12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  55. 55. Content marketing equips buyers with the knowledge toContent Marketing better-informed make decisions.The thinking behind it:Central to content marketing is the belief that if businesses deliver consistent, helpful information to buyers at the right time, then prospects will ultimately reward the company with their purchase and loyalty.12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  56. 56. What is Content Marketing? Content is the reason  people go to your site 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  57. 57. Give your customers the content theywant… …not what YOU think they need! Picture Dan Zarella12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  58. 58. Why is Content Marketing important? Average person is exposed to  5.000 ads / offers per day Buyers have tuned out marketing12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  59. 59. Think of an Art Gallery Where is the Art?12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  60. 60. People come to see art,not empty frames or empty walls Content is the reason people go to your site12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  61. 61. Content Marketing Fundamentals 1 Shift thinking from marketer to publisher 1. Define a critical group of buyers 2. Determine what info prospects really need 3. Determine how prospects want to receive info 4. Deliver info for maximum impact on goals 5. Measure and recalibrate12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  62. 62. Content Marketing Fundamentals 212.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  63. 63. Content Marketing Fundamentals 3 World views! 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  64. 64. Content Marketing Fundamentals 3 1. Consider the worldview of your target customer group 2. Tell a compelling story12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  65. 65. Content Marketing Fundamentals 5 Age is no longer a key indicator - areas of interests are!12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  66. 66. Content Marketing im B2B• Companies don‘t have conversations, PEOPLE have!• B2B is usually about niche problem solving – problems are best solved in teams with many different experts contributing  “niche” CONVERSATIONS• Problem solving requires trust  RELATIONSHIPS• 1:1 Marketing was a buzzword of B2B  n:n12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  67. 67. Content Marketing im B2B• PEOPLE• niche CONVERSATIONS• RELATIONSHIPS• n:n → Social Media Chanels12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  68. 68. New Technologies in B2B Markets thus we have to change how we do things... 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  69. 69. Behavioural Economics• Behavioral economics and the related field, behavioral finance, study the effects of social, cognitive and emotional factors on the economic decisions of individuals and institutions and the consequences for market prices, returns and the resource allocation. The fields are primarily concerned with the bounds of rationality of economic agents. Behavioral models typically integrate insights from psychology with neo-classical economic theory. In so doing they cover a range of concepts, methods, and fields.[1]• Behavioral analysts are not only concerned with the effects of market decisions but also with public choice, which describes another source of economic decisions with related biases towards promoting self-interest. 112.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  70. 70. An Idealized Technology Product Lifecycle Marketsize Innovators Early Early Late Time Laggards 2,5% Adopters Majority Majority 16% 13,5% 34% 34% 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011 Moore; Crossing the Chasm
  71. 71. An Idealized Technology Product Lifecycle Marketsize Innovators Early Early Late Time Laggards 2,5% Adopters Majority Majority 16% 13,5% 34% 34% 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerMoore; Crossing the Chasm
  72. 72. Adopter Categorization on the Basis of Innovativeness Pragmatists: Stick with the herd! Marketsize Conservatives: Hold on! Visionaries: Skeptics: Techies:Get ahead! No way! Try it! Time Innovators Early Early Late Laggards Adopters Majority Majority 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerMoore; Crossing the Chasm
  73. 73. Mainstream Behaviournumber of adoptions Noncumulative  Increasingly  conforming behaviour Innovators Early Early  Late  Laggards Time Adopters Majority Majority Hillmer, Technology Acceptance in Mechatronics, 2009. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  74. 74. Individualistic Behaviournumber of adoptions Noncumulative  Increasingly  individualistic  behaviour Innovators Early Early  Late  Laggards Time Adopters Majority MajorityChart based on Rogers 1995, p. 262 and Moore 1999, p. 12 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  75. 75. Σ Content Marketing12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  76. 76. Σ Content Marketing „Once upon a time…“12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  77. 77. Best and Worse Practice12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Dr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  78. 78. Trust building with Pragmatic Innovation Customers „Concentrate a overwhelming power on a small, focused target market segment“  FOCUS Customer 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  79. 79. Focus 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  80. 80. Trustbuilding withPragmatic Technology Customers• Be familiar with the worldview, processes and the issues that worry your customer segment Customer Insight  Relative advantage  compatibility  References  trialability  Peer communities  observability  Vender neutral   less complexity technology information12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  81. 81. Herausforderung B2B im Social Marketing12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  82. 82. Krones AG einer der führenden Hersteller von Maschinen und  Anlagen für die Prozess‐, Abfüll‐und Verpackungstechnik. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  83. 83. Krones Ziele im Web  Entscheider ansprechen (insbesondere zukünftige)  Zielsegmente ansprechen: z.B. Maschinenbediener, Weinblogger  Recruting neuerTwitter Facebook Mitarbeiter Xing Youtube  Identifikation der Mitarbeiter mit dem Unternehmen stärken C. Schmidt, Social Media Officer, Krones AG, 2010 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  84. 84. Interessenten-und Kunden Community: Nutzertypologien Li, Bernoff, Groundswell; Forrester Research, 2009, S.43 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  85. 85. Membership Development Stages Hagel, Armstrong: Net Gain; McKinsey 97 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  86. 86. Im Dialog mit Anwendern • Facebook „Krones Academy“ Facebook im Doppelpack: Krones und Krones Akademie ca. 2000 Fans Recruiting , Mitarbeiter und Kundenbindung 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  87. 87. Im Dialog mit heutigen und zukünftigen Entscheidern - zielgruppenspeziefisch 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  88. 88. Im Dialog mit heutigen und zukünftigen Entscheidern - zielgruppenspeziefisch 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  89. 89. Im Dialog mit heutigen und zukünftigen Entscheidern - zielgruppenspeziefisch 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  90. 90. Im Dialog mit heutigen und zukünftigen Entscheidern 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  91. 91. Im Dialog mit heutigen und zukünftigen Entscheidern - zielgruppenspeziefisch 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  92. 92. Im Dialog mit dem zukünftigen Mitarbeiter 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  93. 93. Best Practice Innov. Marketing 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  94. 94. Best Practice Innov. Marketing 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  95. 95. Best Practice ‚Listening‘Influencer Monitoring: Adobe with eCairn• maps virtual social communities (groups of passionate people experts on a topic) and ranks key influencers within a specific community12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  96. 96. Best Practice ‚Talking‘UPS with popurls.com + whiteboard videos12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  97. 97. Best Practice ‚Energizing‘Spiceworks• The Spiceworks Network is a community of over 1 million IT pros from small to medium Bs using the Spiceworks IT management application in 190 countries.• Most active "SpiceHeads", attracted 1,500 new IT professionals every day.12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  98. 98. Best Practice ‚Spreading‘ Threatpost by Kaspersky • Threatpost is a security news site. • The editorial team for Threatpost created a site that includes both original reporting and aggregation of the most important security news stories. • Threat post reached 208,000 page views, 90,000 unique visitors, and 200 monthly comments between November 2009 and June 2010. There are 10,000 op-in subscribers to its newsletters in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. • Combined, Threatpost activities have captured over 1200 leads for Kaspersky. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  99. 99. Best Practice ‚Supporting‘ IBM developerWorks • IBM developerWorks is a free community and social network for 8 million developers and IT professionals worldwide. It includes content and discussions on open standards, open source, and IBM technical resources in English, Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Korean, Vietnamese, Brazilian Portuguese, and Spanish. It includes 30,000 articles, forums that attract 1 million visitors a month, 400,000 active profiles, 800 bloggers, and 450 wikis. IBM saves $100 million annually from people who use this resource instead of contacting IBM support. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  100. 100. Mehr bei Forrester • http://forrester.typepad.com/groundswell/2010/10/wi nners-of-the-2010-forrester-groundswell-awards- b2b.html 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  101. 101. Some Not So Lucky Strickes See Razorfishs presentation at: http://www.slideshare.net/rlovinger/content-gone-wild 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  102. 102. What is a Content Strategy? Content Strategy plans for the creation, publication and governance of useful, usable content. Content strategy helps you understand not only what content needs to be created and when it needs to be published, but why. (Kristina Halvorson) 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  103. 103. Content Strategy at eBay 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  104. 104. Let‘s learn from mistakes others made Slides from Razorfish 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  105. 105. Technology Marketing – What role does engegement and dialog play? “12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  106. 106. 1. technology product lifecycle or: why focus?? 2. diffusion of innovation 3. customer profile categories 4. 5 things to remember 5. summary12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  107. 107. development phases of a new business or service Cash flow over time Market Demand: Product R&D Lifecycle R&D and inbound Marketing outbound Marketing12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  108. 108. an idealized technology product lifecycle Disruptive Innovation Continuous Innovation Market size Innovators Early Early Late Time Laggards 2,5% Adopters Majority Majority 16% 13,5% 34% 34%Rogers Diffusion of Innovation 1995 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  109. 109. diffusion of innovation varies… Marketsize Time Marketsize Marketsize TimeRogers DiffusionUte Hillmer 12.6.2012 Dr. of Innovation 1995 TimeMoore; Crossing the Chasm 1999.
  110. 110. Why do certain innovations diffuse much faster than others? Why do certain innovations have a much longer main street momentum?12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  111. 111. new disruptive technology … changes how we do things thus we have to change how we do things...12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  112. 112. technology life cycle and its buyercategories Market size Innovators Early Early Late Time Laggards 2,5% Adopters Majority Majority 16% 13,5% 34% 34%Chart based on Rogers 1995, p. 262 and Moore 1999, p. 1212.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  113. 113. technology life cycle and “the gap” or:why you should focus Market size Innovators Early Early Late Time Laggards 2,5% Adopters Majority Majority 16% 13,5% 34% 34%Chart based on Moor 199912.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  114. 114. mainstream behaviour Marktgröße Increasingly  conforming behaviourInnovators Early Early Late Laggards Zeit Adopters Majority Majority Hillmer, Technology Acceptance in Mechatronics, 2009. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  115. 115. individualistic behaviour Marktgröße Increasingly  individualistic  behaviourInnovators Early Early Late Laggards Zeit Adopters Majority Majority Hillmer, Technology Acceptance in Mechatronics, 2009. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  116. 116. things to remember12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  117. 117. stereotype behaviour isuniversal12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  118. 118. start by focusingon 1-3 niches12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  119. 119. an advantage for one individual, a thread for another !12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  120. 120. - segment your customercommunication to accommodatethe differences!12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  121. 121. when your technology dramaticallychanges human behavior -be prepared, …12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  122. 122. the majority of the market mighthesitate to buy for a long timebut when the new way of doingthings gets accepted, everybody wantsit right away.12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  123. 123. what you are familiar with, will be easieraccepted by the mainstream– even if the link is more than vague!12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  124. 124. Intel, mobile devices and 野比 のび太野比 のび太Nobita Nori of theDoraemon Manga withhis dōgu “doko demodoor“, the “go-anywheredoor“ that opens up toany place the userwishes and imagines.12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  125. 125. search for local familiaritiesand wrap it in a story What you are familiar with, will be easier accepted by the mainstream – even if the link is more than vague! 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerSource: Mail Online , 17 November 2010
  126. 126. Use the different personality profiles inyour customer dialog:visionaries as visionaries,pragmatists as pragmatists12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  127. 127. early adopters = visionaries MarktsizeInnovators Early Early Late Laggards Time Adopters Majority Majority 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  128. 128. early majority = pragmatists MarktsizeInnovators Early Early Late Laggards Time Adopters Majority Majority 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  129. 129. in 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  130. 130. don’t forget tolook outside theboundaries ofrationality, despite the economicthese usually contextvary by culture12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  131. 131. Subjective Construction of Reality Each individual sees the world through subjective lenses. Consider typical customer segments universally and look for social and emotional differences by region... and then TELL YOUR STORY!Seth Godin, All Marketeers tell stories, 2009Mischel and Morf, Ute Hillmer of self and identity, 2003. 12.6.2012 Dr. HandbookKelly, The psychology of personal constructs, 1991
  132. 132. And now12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  133. 133. Exanples Dialogmarketing heute• mymuesli• Dell• Krones• Litago Milch• Jugend gegen Aids• Domino Pizza12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  134. 134. Krones KundenfokusKrones plant, entwickelt und fertigt Maschinen undkomplette Anlage … wie viele andere auch … aber:Vertrauensaufbau durch klare Ausrichtung auf Marktsegmente - aus der Kundenperspektive!12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  135. 135. Focus 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  136. 136. Krones Support und Training12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  137. 137. Wismet Filter für höchste Ansprüche12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  138. 138. Elsäßer Filtertechnik12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  139. 139. Elsäßer Filtertechnik12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  140. 140. Vertrauensaufbau mit dem“Pragmatischen Technologiekunden”Seine Arbeitsprozesse, seine Probleme und Sorgensowie seinen Blick auf die Welt kennen undverstehen. Kunden Insight Relative Vorteile  Referenzen Kompatibilität Testbarkeit  Gemeinschaft Gleichgesinnter Beobachtbarkeit Reduzierte  Herstellerneutrale Informationen Komplexität12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  141. 141. Dell‘s zielgruppenspez. Kundendialog12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  142. 142. Es wird auch über Ihre Produkte geredet –sind Sie im Bilde?• Man redet über ihre Produkte – mit Ihnen oder ohne Sie … Versuchen Sie den Verlauf mitzubestimmen!• “Dell Hell” war 2005 ein Weckruf12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  143. 143. Jeff Jarvis Blogpost12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  144. 144. Dell Communities Blog‘s ,Forums, IdeaStorm Zielsetzung Kundeninsight Plattformen für Problemlösungen und Ideen Kundenbonding, pos. Marken-wahrnehmung Zielkunde Segmentierte Kundengruppen + zukünftige Kunden SM Strategie Beteiligung + Lernen von und mit Kunden „Be were your customer is“ Resultate Ca. 1.7 M registrierte Mitglieder 2.300-2.500 Posts/Woche12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  145. 145. TechCenter Blog, Chat, Community12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  146. 146. Dell IdeaStorm Ideenbörse und Innovationszentrum Zielsetzung Kundenideen + –problemen generieren Kundeninsight zu Dringlichkeiten Zielkunde  Marketing Kunden  F&E Potentielle Kunden SM Strategie Beteiligung + Lernen Resultate 15.000 Ideen >900.000 Stimmen abgegeben 500 Ideen Implementiert12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  147. 147. Dell Design Studio Mass IndividualisationZielsetzung Mass Customization Brand- WahrnehmungZielmarkt Individualist. Kunden Potentielle KundenSM Strategie Online Angebot 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  148. 148. Dell Shop eCommerce mit sozialen Inhalten12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  149. 149. DellOutlet Twitter als Outletstore Zielsetzung Verkauf Brand-Wahrnehmung ändern Zielmarkt Kunden Potentielle Kunden SM Strategie Twitter als Geschäftsplattform Resultate Juni 2009: $6,5 M Umsatz Twitter USA: 1,5 Mio Follower (D: 131 seit Feb. 2011)12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  150. 150. DellOutlet Deutschland Twitter als Outletstore12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  151. 151. DellOutlet China Twitter als Outletstore12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  152. 152. DellCares Twitter als Supportkanal Objective Kundenprobleme lösen Brand-Wahrnehmung ändern Target Kunden Potentielle Kunden SM Strategie Twitter als Supportkanal Resultate 10.000 Follower 10.000 Tweets12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  153. 153. Dell Monitoring „Social Media Listening Command Center“ Zielsetzung Informieren: Kundenfeedback in Echtzeit bereitstellen Zuhören & Agieren: frühe Warnsignale erkennen und schnell handeln Sicherstellen, daß effektive Kundeninteraktionen stattfinden Unterstützend – Infos und Support für die Communities mit Einfluß im Netz Zielkunde Alle relevanten Abteilungen im Unternehmen Kunden/potentielle Kunden Communities / influencer SM Strategie Schaltzentrale12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  154. 154. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  155. 155. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  156. 156. TheSocial MediaToolbox12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  157. 157. What Media Channels should I use? Where should my company be present? 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing
  158. 158. 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  159. 159. The Social Media Toolbox Choose your channel wisely 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing Slide by Presentation Advisors
  160. 160. Select YOUR Tools not All Tools!12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  161. 161. Which Media to choose?12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer 19.12.2011
  162. 162. Social Media as a Workflow Process Communication  Channel Corporate Hosting XING PR Content Youtube Facebook Website Flickr Twitter Microsites Issuu Foursquare Blog Slideshare Yammer NewsletterSlide by Björn Eichstädt, Storymaker12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  163. 163. Types of Social Media Interaction by Source Social  Service Questions & complaints Social Market Market‐ Sales Information triggered social  Social  Customer interactions Marketing Preferences (outside‐to‐outside) Market Twitter Corporate Social Content Existing Social Media FB  Accoun Corporate Blogs, Forums,  (Facebook, Xing, Twitter,  Page t branded / unbranded Social  Linkedin, etc.) Networks, etc.) Google … + Business‐ Customer‐facing triggered social  employee interactions Monitoring /  Data Mining (inside‐to‐outside Corp.  inside‐to‐inside) Website Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Marketing Sales Service F&Ebased on Cipriani 2009 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Marketing Sales Service F&E
  164. 164. Types of Social Media Interactionby Purpose Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierung CRM = Customer Relationship Management12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  165. 165. How to get started3. Which Media to choose? generate interest for a Marketinggoal  Get visitors to the conference website Media maybe maybe12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  166. 166. 360° Medienmanagement Kundenprofile beachten• Was machen Silver Surfer (>50 J.)  Online? 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  167. 167. 360° MedienmanagementKundenprofil: Digital Natives Was machen Digital Natives (zwischen 14 und 29 J.) online?12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  168. 168. The Corporate Website:Center Stage +Aggregation Point12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  169. 169. The Corporate Website:Center Stage +Aggregation Point12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  170. 170. The Corporate Website:Center Stage +Aggregation Point12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  171. 171. The Corporate Website:Center Stage +Aggregation Point12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  172. 172. The Corporate Website• You control the content and the design• You can backlink all media channels to the site• One stop overview, monitor and archive• Low cost professional site with Open Source tools like Wordpress und Joomla, templates, plug-ins und RSS feeds.12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  173. 173. The Corporate Website• You must manage and maintain the site including its layout and design, content, tech. support and its URL(s)• Corporate Websites are usually seen as push marketing.• Cost and time intensive12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  174. 174. The Corporate Blogas the “Sun of the Solar Content System”12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  175. 175. The Corporate Blogblog.daimler.de12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  176. 176. Dell Blogs Blogs ,Forums Objective Kundeninsight Plattform for problem solving and ideas Customer bonding, pos. brand recognition Target Segmented customer groups + prospects SM Strategy Engagement and learning from and with customers Results 1.7 M registered members (spring11) 2.300-2.500 Posts/Woche12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  177. 177. Direct2Dell Blog12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  178. 178. TechCenter Blog, Chat, Community 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  179. 179. Dell Shares Investor Relations12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  180. 180. TechCenter Blog, Chat, Community12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  181. 181. The Corporate BlogEmployees as Experts12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  182. 182. Types of Social CRM Interaction Social  Questions & Service complaints Social Market Market‐ Sales Information triggered social  Social  Customer interactions Marketing Preferences (outside‐to‐outside) Market Existing Social Media  Corporate Social Content Networks Corporate Blogs, Forums,  (Facebook, Xing, Twitter,  branded / unbranded Social  Linkedin, etc.) Networks, etc.) Business‐ Customer‐facing triggered social  employee interactions Monitoring /  (inside‐to‐outside Data Mining inside‐to‐inside) Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Marketing Sales Service R&Dbased on Cipriani 2009 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Marketing Sales Service R&D
  183. 183. The Corporate BlogTypes of Social Media Interaction Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierung12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  184. 184. The Corporate Blog• You can show that you know a lot about a topic• You are easily found by search engines (search engines follow backlinks; a good article easily generates 10-50 backlinks in a few days)• It is free for the customer and free media for you as a vendor• You can segment your target market nicely• It can be the starting point for new content, hosts conversations, can provide context for news• It can be a starting point for personal brands• Small companies can get to the top of search engine rankings12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  185. 185. The Corporate Blog• Frequency is a must  time consuming• You are not credible in a “controlled” bog• You don’t control what is said in an open employee blog• Generating relevant and interesting content on a frequent basis is not easy12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  186. 186. The Corporate BlogMake some rules. Empower all employees… they are the brand. • Behave professionally and ethically. • Take personal responsibility. • Include a disclaimer: your opinions are yours,  not IBM’s. • Don’t pick fights. “Use social media as a means to expose IBM’s  experts—and expertise—to the world.” Adam Christensen Manager, Social Media Communications12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer http://www.ibm.com/blogs/zz/en/guidelines.html
  187. 187. Social Networks12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  188. 188. Social Networks 2 Social networks are network communities on the internet. Users can add friends or followers and send them messages or notify them about updates concerning themselves.12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  189. 189. Built and Maintain Networks Individuals, professionals and companies look for  suitable networks and clusters Within a network, they look for suitable groups and  joint them 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  190. 190. How Social Networks work Think about a  sports club!12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  191. 191. How Social Networks work 2• Voluntary active or passive membership• Special areas of interests• One communicates where one has something to say (or not), has an opinion, answers questions, asks questions, …• If one is open, friendly and nice, friendships will develop that value ones expertise and opinion• Once one has built a reputation, it will be accepted, even appreciated if one recommends and hints one ones products and services, online shop, other products…12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  192. 192. How Social Networks work 3 Friends are easily found, one links up, meets, networks, … and own expertise distributes … 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  193. 193. Dell on Facebook CommunityObjective Customer insight Customer bonding, pos. Brand  recognitionTarget Segmented customer groups  and prospectsSM Strategy „Be were your customer is“ Offer community experience Results 644.723 likes (July 2011) 909.910 likes (Dec 2011) 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  194. 194. Dell on Facebook Ratings12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  195. 195. Dell on Google +12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  196. 196. Dell on Google + Hangouts 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  197. 197. Types of Social CRM Interaction Social  Questions & Service complaints Social Market Market‐ Sales Information triggered social  Social  Customer interactions Marketing Preferences (outside‐to‐outside) Market Existing Social Media  Corporate Social Content Networks Corporate Blogs, Forums,  (Facebook, Xing, Twitter,  branded / unbranded Social  Linkedin, etc.) Networks, etc.) Business‐ Customer‐facing triggered social  employee interactions Monitoring /  (inside‐to‐outside Data Mining inside‐to‐inside) Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Marketing Sales Service R&Dbased on Cipriani 2009 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Marketing Sales Service R&D
  198. 198. Areas of Action in Social CRM Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierung12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  199. 199. Starting point for Social Customer RelationshipManagement Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierung12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  200. 200. Social Networks • Direct customer communication • Efficient marketing tool • Largest social Network • Gives companies “a face” • Many forms of interaction or “faces” • Entertainment • Connectable with twitter, • Full display of many media Google+, linkedin… formats (pictures, movies, games, ...) • Mobile app • Cool ideas result in huge reach • Location updates • Personal reputation • Many apps enlarge management functionality • Facebook statistics12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  201. 201. Social Networks Practice • Uncontrolled environment • Privacy problems for employees – Like button (documenting all activity on the website) • Time-consuming – Open FB tab in Browser • Less exciting products – Apps can result in spam can have a hard time • Hard to separate private and gaining recognition business • FB can change the rules as • Requires high frequency they like (free service) of relevant content generation12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  202. 202. Business Oriented Social Networks • More serious environments, no personal content • Suitable for personal business profile pages • Increasingly commercial + • Customer + recruiter research spam • Personal reputation • Time consuming management • Not all audiences are in • Business oriented groups these networks • Business contact initiation and • Often regional management12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  203. 203. Content Sharing Platforms• Online Communities for archiving and sharing content such as: – Photographs and images – Videos – Audios – Presentations12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  204. 204. Social Media as a Workflow ProcessCommunication Channel Corporate Hosting XING PR Content Youtube Facebook Website Flickr Twitter Microsites Issuu Foursquare Blog Slideshare Yammer Newsletter12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  205. 205. Content Sharing Platforms  Easy way to display, archive and share • Copyright problems  No need for own • Free data upload or infrastructure and information spread is storage limited  Possible real time • No quality control of reporting of events content and material  Products / content is ranked by audience12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  206. 206. Crowd Sourcing / Open Innovation19.12.2011 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  207. 207. Dell‘s Crowdsourcing Aktivitäten12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  208. 208. IdeaStorm Open Innovation Platform Objective Collect product ideas, and Product solution ideas from customers Custoner insight ranked by urgency Target customer prospect  Marketing SM Strategy R&D Engagement + learning Results (7/11) 15.000 ideas >900.000 votes 500 ideas implemented12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer 19.12.2011
  209. 209. Dell Design Studio Mass Individualisation Objective  mass customization  brand recognition Target  individualistic customers +  prospects SM Strategie  online offer12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  210. 210. Open Innovation through Social Media12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  211. 211. Directly involved Innovation Resources: R&Dand Marketing (inbound+outbound) Cash flow over time Market Demand:  Product Lifecycle R&D inbound Marketing outbound Marketing12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  212. 212. Types of Social CRM Interaction Social  Questions & Service complaints Social Market Market‐ Sales Information triggered social  Social  Customer interactions Marketing Preferences (outside‐to‐outside) Market Existing Social Media  Corporate Social Content Networks Corporate Blogs, Forums,  (Facebook, Xing, Twitter,  branded / unbranded Social  Linkedin, etc.) Networks, etc.) Business‐ Customer‐facing triggered social  employee interactions Monitoring /  (inside‐to‐outside Data Mining inside‐to‐inside) Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Marketing Sales Service R&Dbased on Cipriani 2009 Marketing Sales Service R&D 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  213. 213. Areas of Action in Social CRM Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierungbased on AltimeterHillmer 2010 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Group
  214. 214. Starting point forSocial Customer Relationship Management Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierung based on AltimeterHillmer 2010 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute GroupDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  215. 215. Online Shops12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  216. 216. Dell Shop eCommercewith Social Content Objective sales Change brand perception Target customers prospects SM Strategie eShop with rankings + reviews12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  217. 217. Recommendation Platforms • Here users share experiences, perceptions and recommendations about products, services and organizations . • bad products are exposed Sometimes detailed discussions can evolve.. • Products are ranked by audience • credibility • good products are usually ranked positively12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  218. 218. Types of Social CRM Interaction Social  Questions & Service complaints Social Market Market‐ Sales Information triggered social  Social  Customer interactions Marketing Preferences (outside‐to‐outside) Market Existing Social Media  Corporate Social Content Networks Corporate Blogs, Forums,  (Facebook, Xing, Twitter,  branded / unbranded Social  Linkedin, etc.) Networks, etc.) Business‐ Customer‐facing triggered social  employee interactions Monitoring /  (inside‐to‐outside Data Mining inside‐to‐inside) Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Marketing Sales Service R&Dbased on Cipriani 2009 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Marketing Sales Service R&D 19.12.2011
  219. 219. Areas of Action in Social CRM Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierungbased on AltimeterHillmer 2010 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Group
  220. 220. Starting point for Social Customer Relationship Management Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierungbased on AltimeterHillmer 2010 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Group
  221. 221. Microblogging12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  222. 222. Twitter Microblogging is a form of blogging that allows users to send brief text updates (or micromedia such as photos or audio clips) and publish them. These messages can be submitted by a variety of means like text messaging, instant messaging, E- mail, digital audio or the web. (Wikipedia) 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  223. 223. Dell on Twitter12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  224. 224. Dell‘s Twitter Activities12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  225. 225. DellOutlet Twitter as an Outletstore Objective selling change brand recognition Target customers prospects SM Strategy Twitter as a sales plattform Results June 2009: $6,5 M revenue Delloutlet: 1,54 Mio 7/11 1,55 Mio 12/11 follower (D: 131 seit Feb. 2011)12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer 19.12.2011
  226. 226. DellOutlet Deutschland Twitter as an Outletstore 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  227. 227. DellOutlet China Twitter as an Outletstore 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  228. 228. Twitter  fast  cheap • only short messages (Twitter 140  real-time communication characters)  real-time market research • short lifetime of tweets  advertising allowed • a lot of meaningless information  direct customer in twitter sphere  great monitoring tool (alternative • difficult to measure clients, e.g. tritterdeck)  interest based, not friendship • Spam / unpleasant followers based possible  global • Fast media for fast + easy  mobile mistakes12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  229. 229. Types of Social CRM Interaction Social  Questions & Service complaints Social Market Market‐ Sales Information triggered social  Social  Customer interactions Marketing Preferences (outside‐to‐outside) Market Existing Social Media  Corporate Social Content Networks Corporate Blogs, Forums,  (Facebook, Xing, Twitter,  branded / unbranded Social  Linkedin, etc.) Networks, etc.) Business‐ Customer‐facing triggered social  employee interactions Monitoring /  (inside‐to‐outside Data Mining inside‐to‐inside) Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Marketing Sales Service R&D based on Cipriani 2009 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer MarketingDr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing Sales Service R&D 19.12.2011
  230. 230. Areas of Action in Social CRM Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierung12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  231. 231. Starting point for Social Customer RelationshipManagement Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierung12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  232. 232. DellCares Twitter as a Support Channel Objective Solve customer problems Change brand recognition Target customers prospects SM Strategy Twitter as a support channel Results 10.000 follower (7/11) 15.600 follower (12/11) 13.460 Tweets12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  233. 233. Types of Social CRM Interaction Social  Questions & Service complaints Social Market Market‐ Sales Information triggered social  Social  Customer interactions Marketing Preferences (outside‐to‐outside) Market Existing Social Media  Corporate Social Content Networks Corporate Blogs, Forums,  (Facebook, Xing, Twitter,  branded / unbranded Social  Linkedin, etc.) Networks, etc.) Business‐ Customer‐facing triggered social  employee interactions Monitoring /  (inside‐to‐outside Data Mining inside‐to‐inside) Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Socially‐enabled Marketing Sales Service R&Dbased on Cipriani 2009 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Marketing Sales Service R&D
  234. 234. Areas of Action in Social CRM Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierungbased on AltimeterHillmer 2010 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Group
  235. 235. Starting point for Social Customer Relationship Management Marketing Sales Service/Support Innovation Social Marketing Social Sales Social Support  Social Innovation Insight Insight Insight Insight Rapid Social Rapid Social  Rapid Social  Crowedsourced Marketing Response Sales Response Support Response F&E Social Event Socially‐enabled Sales Referal Management Service Social Campaign  Proactive Lead Tracking Generierungbased on AltimeterHillmer 2010 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Group
  236. 236. Monitoring Twitter as a trend scout Objective Identify future trends Identify brand + product issues Target Marketing R&D SM Strategy Twitter als Supportkanal12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer
  237. 237. Why Social Media Monitoring?Issue Management What expectations do different stakeholders hold? Identify areas with potential for conflict early and address them proactively (before the broader public gets aware) Identify, monitor and construct actions to manage/reduce/neutralize stakeholder discrepancy of expectations. Develop an “early warning system”12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Dr. Ute Hillmer, Better 19.12.201 Reality Marketing 1
  238. 238. Remember: They talk about you!• They do it with or without you … you should steer the direction best you can!• Dell Hell was a showcase starting point in 200512.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Dr. Ute Hillmer, Better Reality Marketing 19.12.2011
  239. 239. Why Social Media Monitoring?Customer Service and Support, CRM Identify and address core customer needs Sales advice Setup / integration support Runtime support Customers help customers Identify and bond with advocates Identify and utilize star experts Reduce support cost12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Dr. Ute Hillmer, Better 19.12.201 Reality Marketing 1
  240. 240. Why Social Media Monitoring?Product Marketing and R&D Identify + address product shortcomings / improvement opportunities Customer / user complains Customer / user suggestions and ideas Customer / user use cases Identify and address core customer needs Industry discussions Crowd sourcing Identify trends Industry discussions Crowd sourcing12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Dr. Ute Hillmer, Better 19.12.201 Reality Marketing 1
  241. 241. SMM Value Creation and KPIs Traditional Online Marketing Page Impressions Unique Visitors Conversions Social Media Marketing Foster Dialog Promote Advocacy Facilitate Support Spur Innovation12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Dr. Ute Hillmer, Better 19.12.201 Reality Marketing 1
  242. 242. SMM Value Creation and KPIs 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute HillmerSource: rolandfiege.com Dr. Ute Hillmer, Better 19.12.201 Reality Marketing 1
  243. 243. Why Social Media Monitoring?Brand Management What brand image do stakeholders have in mind? What brand image do I want them to have? Develop brand buzz to help steer brand image (truthful and authentic) Monitor brand image of core stakeholder groups and construe action to reduce discrepancy if necessary Identify brand associations Monitor the competition12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer Dr. Ute Hillmer, Better 19.12.201 Reality Marketing 1
  244. 244. SMM Value Creation and KPIs Success metrics must be developed with specific business objectives in mind to be used and useful. mythological, pragmatic, common senseSource: Social Marketing Analytics, Altimeter 2010, p. 9 12.6.2012 Dr. Ute Hillmer

×