Pitch presentations

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  • + In this section we will talk about developing and presenting a professional and inspirational pitch for your enterprise. + This presentation will explain how to create a compelling pitch, with a focus on presentation skills. This includes what to do before you start your presentation, how to design interesting slides, how to give your presentation, and how to structure your pitch. It’s a lot of information, but you’ll get handouts on the major topics at the end.
  • + You’re going to develop a PowerPoint (PPT) presentation to deliver your pitch. But that doesn’t mean that you immediately pull out PPT and get going. If you want to create a great presentation there are a few things you need to do first. Like: Define your purpose, create a structure, and develop handouts.
  • + The first thing you should do is ask yourself why you are creating a presentation. What is the real purpose of your talk? What does the audience expect? What are the most important parts of your topic for the audience to take away? Once you have a purpose, then you can align the rest of your presentation to this purpose. If something doesn’t help you achieve your goal—cut it out. If you are trying to figure out the “right” way of presenting something, consider which way supports your purpose best. You should write out your purpose before you start.+ After you decide on your purpose you need to outline a structure for your presentation that supports your purpose or goal. Taking time to do this before you start creating your presentation will help you keep you logic straight and thinking clear.+ Write down key points and assemble and create a structure that works them together. You can also draw quick ideas for visuals such as charts or photos that will later appear in the PPT, or visualize the flow of the presentation entirely if it is easier for you to work that way.+ When developing your structure, remember to “Keep it Simple, Stupid. KISS”. Keeping it simple actually takes MORE thought and planning on your part because you have to think very hard about what to include and what to leave out. One way to keep it simple is to ask, “What three or four things do I want my audience to remember about my presentation?” + Your slides should be simple, with very little text (more on that in the next section). So to relive the pressure of putting too much text and information into your presentation create a leave-behind. You can put all the details in this document. This helps keep the presentation simple, and allows your audience to take less notes. If done well, you can use your structure outline as the basis of this document. + Don’t give people the handout before you start your presentation, but let them know its coming. You want their full attention on you!
  • + After you have a great plan for your presentation, the next thing that you should do is start making slides. We’re going to give you some pointers here, and do some exercises. We’ll talk about PPT basics, words, images, and layouts.
  • + So first, let’s talk about the basics of PPT—what not to do and what to do.+ Do make slides that reinforce your words. Don’t make slides that just repeat them. The slide should be a background that provides a basis and supports the emotional appeal for your words.+ Do take pictures and make your own images. Don’t use lineart from PPT.+ Do use good high resolution images. Do not stretch small images you find online.+ Do use videos and sound recordings. Don’t use canned sounds built into PPT.+ Do make your own original background. Don’t use a standard PPT template.+ Basically, don’t use the standard built in parts of PPT. Everyone knows these tools and they bore people and make your presentation look generic. Create your own content whenever possible.
  • + Words are an important part of your presentation. Here are some basic rules for how many to use and what they should look like.+ Only use a few words per page. Like six. Try to make a presentation with only six words per page and see how it feels. It will be hard at first, but it will be better than a very wordy presentation. Six words isn’t an absolute, but it is a good rule of thumb.+ Fonts are not just what words are made of. Think of them as graphic elements or even as illustrations of their own.+ Fonts communicate subtle messages, which is font choice is important. To find the right font, write the same word on different slides and see which looks best to you—which one has the best feel for your presentation, for what you want to accomplish.+ Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation, and use no more than two complementary fonts. + No matter what font you choose, make sure the text can be read from the back of the room. Thirty-point font is a good rule of thumb. Using this larger font will also make it easier to keep your word count down on each page
  • + In groups of 3. Type out this sentence into a slide: Mr. Bean entered the room.+ Now, let’s see how fonts change the meaning of this sentence. Each group should try change the tone of this sentence by only changing the font. (One tone for each group):+Serious, Sad, Angry, Excited, Funny, Curious, Friendly (enough for 21 students).
  • + Words can’t do everything in your presentation; you are also going to need to use images to help tell your story. And while great photographs can do a lot of the work, there are going to be times where you need to create graphs and charts on your own.
  • + Charts. There are two really popular types of charts pie charts and bar graphs. Pie charts are great to show percentages (parts of a whole). Bar graphs are nice for comparing growth or quantities. Flow charts are useful for explaining a process.
  • + Diagrams. Diagrams are really similar to charts, but they often convey more abstract information and focus on explaining relationships. There are several types and here are a few. Venn Diagrams are often used to explain how three or more ideas relate to each other, and what happens when they overlap. Cluster Maps are used to explain complicated relationships—like when we mapped out stakeholders last month. And Quadrant Maps are excellent for showing opportunities, and explaining how ideas or people relate to each other.
  • + In separate groups of three, use a different chart or diagram to describe the student body at your high school. You don’t need to do this in PPT, just draw it out!+ Each team should use one of the following (each group is different): Pie Chart, Bar Graph, Venn Diagram, Cluster Map, Quadrant Map, Flow Chart.
  • + So we know the basics. We understand fonts and we’ve made graphs, but how do we bring it all together? In one word—layouts. People go to school for years to get good at layouts, but here are three rules of thumb that should help you out.
  • + Rule of Thirds. Basically means don’t put things in the middle. If you divide the slide into thirds—both horizontal and vertical—put the center of attention at one of the thirds. This will make your slides more interesting and dynamic.+ Negative Space. You don’t need to fill every square inch of your slide with information. Human eyes want to rest, and using negative, or empty, space will help them focus on what is important. Give you text room to breathe, especially around the edges of the slide.+ Hierarchy. On any slide, you should only be covering one idea, but even then you may have sub-points. In this case it is important to be sure that eyes know what is most important, so that the message you are conveying is not lost. How do you make certain things more important? Make them bigger. You can also make them more brightly colored, or position them to the top or left. In the US we’re used to reading from top left corner of the page, so placing important information here will make sure it is read first.
  • +That’s the quick course on slide design. So let’s give you a quick test. In groups, I want each of you to design a slide that supports this point: “In Ohio, 84.3 percent of students graduated from high school in 2010, up 1.3 percentage points from the previous year.”+ Take 10 minutes to make this slide. Remember you can use fonts as illustrations, use charts or diagrams, use great photos. What is the best way to support this statement in a slide?
  • + Practice your presentation. Repeat as often as possible. Practice really does make perfect. The more you feel comfortable with your presentation the better it will be when you give it. When you rehearse it, do it with the computer, standing if you’ll be standing. Practice out loud, make eye contact with people who are not there. + Be passionate. People feed off of enthusiasm. While you need to be professional when delivering your presentation, it is appropriate to also be passionate. You need to believe what you are saying and communicate that belief to your audience.+ Hit ‘em hard. The first couple minutes of your pitch are the most important. Get right to the point and grab people attention before they start checking their email on their iphone.+ Look people in the eyes. This relates to confidence in you presentation and a belief in your pitch. Don’t stare at your slides. Engage your audience by looking individuals in the eye.
  • + The top ten. The ten topics that a potential funder cares about are:The Problem, your solution, your business model, the underlying magic/technology (why your solution is special), how you’ll market the business, who is your competition, who is on your team, financial projections and project timeline, a quick summary, and a call to action (help us!).+ These should all be in your pitch. They don’t need to be in this order or all be equal in the weight that you give to them.+ Humans remember stories better than other information they receive in an audible form. Stories will make your presentation sticky—or memorable—to your audience. One of the benefits of considering stakeholders when developing your enterprise ideas is that it will give you stories to tell. A good pitch should include a story or two. This will help make your idea more real to your audience and provides something that they may be able to relate to. It also shows your audience that you have considered the people that your enterprise may effect. Stories can also help clarify complicated ideas.+ You can also use personal stories if they help convey your passion to the audience.+ You should be able to boil down your pitch into a quick sentence. If someone were to ask you what your enterprise is all about, having a one line answer is a great place to start. This one line should explain what you do and why that is special. It should grab attention.
  • + The top ten. The ten topics that a potential funder cares about are:The Problem, your solution, your business model, the underlying magic/technology (why your solution is special), how you’ll market the business, who is your competition, who is on your team, financial projections and project timeline, a quick summary, and a call to action (help us!).+ These should all be in your pitch. They don’t need to be in this order or all be equal in the weight that you give to them.+ Humans remember stories better than other information they receive in an audible form. Stories will make your presentation sticky—or memorable—to your audience. One of the benefits of considering stakeholders when developing your enterprise ideas is that it will give you stories to tell. A good pitch should include a story or two. This will help make your idea more real to your audience and provides something that they may be able to relate to. It also shows your audience that you have considered the people that your enterprise may effect. Stories can also help clarify complicated ideas.+ You can also use personal stories if they help convey your passion to the audience.+ You should be able to boil down your pitch into a quick sentence. If someone were to ask you what your enterprise is all about, having a one line answer is a great place to start. This one line should explain what you do and why that is special. It should grab attention.
  • + OK. Get going on those pitches. (Insert specific instructions here.)
  • + Before you start diving into your pitch I want each of your groups to finish this sentence: “Our ________ is the only ________ that __________.” That’s the essence of your pitch.
  • Pitch presentations

    1. 1. An introduction toPresenting your pitch
    2. 2. Before you start
    3. 3. Before you startDefine your purpose.Create a structure.Make a handout.
    4. 4. Slide Design
    5. 5. Do Don’tReinforce. Repeat.Make images. Use PPT line art.Use highres images. Use lowres images.Make video and audio. Use PPT audio.Make a template. Use a PPT template.
    6. 6. Words areimages. (And you only need six)
    7. 7. Activity:Mr. Bean entered the room.
    8. 8. Images
    9. 9. Pie Charts Bar Graphs Flow Charts Student Student Student Engagement Engagement Engagement Not Now Bored Then 10 min. ago Now 0% 50% 100% BoredBored Not Bored Bored Not Bored Bored Not Bored
    10. 10. Venn Diagram Cluster Map Quadrant Map + Room Room Subject Kinda Not Bored Bored Teacher Subject - + Boredom Subject Kinda Bored Bored Teacher Boredom Teacher -
    11. 11. Activity:Describe the student body at your high school.
    12. 12. Layouts
    13. 13. LayoutsDivide into thirds.Use the negative.Apply hierarchy.
    14. 14. Activity:“In Ohio, 84.3 percent of students graduatedfrom high school in 2010, up 1.3 percentagepoints from the previous year.”
    15. 15. DeliveryPractice your pitch.Be passionate.Start with gusto.Make eye contact.
    16. 16. Pitch Structure
    17. 17. Pitch Structure The Why it is Your Why it is The details.problem important. solution. great. Tell a story. Elevator pitch.
    18. 18. Start yourpitches!
    19. 19. Activity:Our ________is the only ________that __________.

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