Life, IT and everything

921 views

Published on

This is the slide deck of a keynote I gave at Java Forum Nord 2016.

I started with some of the contradictory requirements, developers find themselves often confronted with and the question, if there is a bigger context that we can use to make sense of it.

Then I did a bit of "time-traveling", explaining where we came from and how business and IT have evolved over time. The core finding was that we find ourselves in the middle of a revolution that is going on (not only) in IT.

The last part were some recommendations how an IT developer can at least reduce the risk to become "revolution roadkill".

As always most of the content was on the voice track. But maybe the slides are still a bit helpful on their own.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
921
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
13
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
32
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Life, IT and everything

  1. 1. Life, IT and everything about revolutions, outside-the-box journeys and the daily IT madness Uwe Friedrichsen – codecentric AG – 2014-2016
  2. 2. @ufried Uwe Friedrichsen | uwe.friedrichsen@codecentric.de | http://slideshare.net/ufried | http://ufried.tumblr.com
  3. 3. Be flexible … but stick to the plan!
  4. 4. Be innovative … but don’t break anything!
  5. 5. Be agile … but adhere to all processes!
  6. 6. Be disruptive … but don’t change anything!
  7. 7. Be the new Netflix … but don’t spend any money!
  8. 8. Woot ?!?
  9. 9. Have they all gone nuts?
  10. 10. Or is there a bigger schema, we just don’t recognize? Meaning Madness
  11. 11. Time for a short journey
 through space and time ...
  12. 12. Journey #1 The evolution of markets
  13. 13. Formal part of value creation Solution: machine Dynamic part of value creation Solution: man sluggishness/low dynamic high dynamichigh dynamic The historical course of market dynamics and the recent rise of highly dynamic and complex markets The dominance of high dynamics and complexity is neither good nor bad. It‘s a historical fact. t1970/80 today Age of crafts manu- facturing Age of tayloristic industry Age of global markets 1850/1900 Spacious markets, little competition Local markets, high customi- zation Outperformers exercise market pressure over conventional companies We call the graph shown here the “Taylor Bathtub”. The “bathtub” curve Source: BetaCodex Network Associates, “Organize for complexity”, BetaCodex Network White Paper 12 & 13
  14. 14. Formal part of value creation Solution: machine Dynamic part of value creation Solution: man sluggishness/low dynamic high dynamichigh dynamic The historical course of market dynamics and the recent rise of highly dynamic and complex markets The dominance of high dynamics and complexity is neither good nor bad. It‘s a historical fact. t1970/80 today Age of crafts manu- facturing Age of tayloristic industry Age of global markets 1850/1900 Spacious markets, little competition Local markets, high customi- zation Outperformers exercise market pressure over conventional companies We call the graph shown here the “Taylor Bathtub”. Pre-industrial era Source: BetaCodex Network Associates, “Organize for complexity”, BetaCodex Network White Paper 12 & 13 Tailor-made solutions “Mastery is key to success”
  15. 15. Formal part of value creation Solution: machine Dynamic part of value creation Solution: man sluggishness/low dynamic high dynamichigh dynamic The historical course of market dynamics and the recent rise of highly dynamic and complex markets The dominance of high dynamics and complexity is neither good nor bad. It‘s a historical fact. t1970/80 today Age of crafts manu- facturing Age of tayloristic industry Age of global markets 1850/1900 Spacious markets, little competition Local markets, high customi- zation Outperformers exercise market pressure over conventional companies We call the graph shown here the “Taylor Bathtub”. Industrial era Source: BetaCodex Network Associates, “Organize for complexity”, BetaCodex Network White Paper 12 & 13 Cost-efficiently scale production “Get more done with less people is key to success”
  16. 16. Formal part of value creation Solution: machine Dynamic part of value creation Solution: man sluggishness/low dynamic high dynamichigh dynamic The historical course of market dynamics and the recent rise of highly dynamic and complex markets The dominance of high dynamics and complexity is neither good nor bad. It‘s a historical fact. t1970/80 today Age of crafts manu- facturing Age of tayloristic industry Age of global markets 1850/1900 Spacious markets, little competition Local markets, high customi- zation Outperformers exercise market pressure over conventional companies We call the graph shown here the “Taylor Bathtub”. Post-industrial era Source: BetaCodex Network Associates, “Organize for complexity”, BetaCodex Network White Paper 12 & 13 Continuously respond to changing demands “Continuous customer communication is key to success”
  17. 17. Industrial era •  Cost-efficiency •  Scalability •  Repeatability •  Stability Changing markets create new drivers Post-industrial era •  Cycle times •  Adaptability •  Flexibility •  Resilience
  18. 18. Side note Organizations as enablers and preventers
  19. 19. Journey #2 The evolution of IT
  20. 20. 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Complicated (Business functions) Complex (Business processes) Highly complex (Business nervous system) Software crisis Software engineering PC LAN Internet Business Support of IT Selective Holistic Complicated Complex “Moore’s law” Mobile IoT
  21. 21. 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Complicated (Business functions) Complex (business processes) Highly complex (Business nervous system) Software crisis Software engineering PC LAN Internet Business Support of IT Selective Holistic Complicated Complex “Moore’s law” Mobile IoT We are here …
  22. 22. 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Complicated (Business functions) Complex (business processes) Highly complex (Business nervous system) Software crisis Software engineering PC LAN Internet Business Support of IT Selective Holistic Complicated Complex “Moore’s law” Mobile IoT … but we still base most of our decisions on that We are here …
  23. 23. Formal part of value creation Solution: machine Dynamic part of value creation Solution: man sluggishness/low dynamic high dynamichigh dynamic The historical course of market dynamics and the recent rise of highly dynamic and complex markets The dominance of high dynamics and complexity is neither good nor bad. It‘s a historical fact. t1970/80 today Age of crafts manu- facturing Age of tayloristic industry Age of global markets 1850/1900 Spacious markets, little competition Local markets, high customi- zation Outperformers exercise market pressure over conventional companies We call the graph shown here the “Taylor Bathtub”. Remember the bathtub curve? This adds an additional twist …
  24. 24. 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Complicated (Business functions) Complex (business processes) Highly complex (Business nervous system) Software crisis Software engineering PC LAN Internet Business Support of IT Selective Holistic Complicated Complex “Moore’s law” Mobile IoT … but we still base most of our decisions on that We are here … Business is very different today … … than it was back then
  25. 25. Business Market IT today is a … … Nervous System … Medium … Product … Differentiator Disruptive Technologies Business Support Systems Continuous Conversation Digitization
  26. 26. Business is IT and IT is business
  27. 27. The traditional IT “best practices” are counterproductive because they solve
 a completely different problem
  28. 28. What can we learn?
  29. 29. We are in the middle of a revolution
  30. 30. Unfortunately, quite often
 we do not feel like them …
  31. 31. ... but more like them
  32. 32. How can we avoid becoming revolution roadkill?
  33. 33. A few recommendations …
  34. 34. #1 Understand the post-industrial IT
  35. 35. Rethinking IT
  36. 36. What are the new drivers?
  37. 37. IT Post-Industrialism Highly dynamic markets Economic Darwinism Lean startup/lean enterprise Continuous design Digitization IT as a product Digital conversation Social media Contextual computing Disruption Innovation through disruption Cloud, mobile, IoT, serverless Big data analytics Data-driven enterprise force change on
  38. 38. What are the new goals?
  39. 39. IT … be quick Short response times Holistic IT value chain consideration … be effective Focus on outcome, not output … improve continuously Improvement as planned activity needs to … … be efficient Provide required throughput … be reliable High availability and reliability … be flexible Flexible response to changing needs
  40. 40. Process & Org needs to be … Quick Flexible Effective Software needs to be … Secure Changeable Robust … and improve continuously
  41. 41. Process & Org needs to be … Software needs to be … Quick Flexible Effective Secure Changeable Robust … and improve continuously How can we achieve the new goals?
  42. 42. Let’s learn from the digitization natives
  43. 43. Adaption DevOps Systemic optimization Inspect and adapt Quick feedback loops Continuous improvement … Process DevOps Agile Lean Feature Flow (no projects) Design Thinking … Governance Beyond Budgeting Decentralized control Outcome-driven Lean EAM … Organization DevOps Autonomous teams Cross-functional teams End-2-end responsibility Routine task automation … People Craftsmanship T-shaped Responsibility Curiosity Empathy … Technology Cloud Automation Microservice Heterogeneity Resilience … (Some) Building Blocks
  44. 44. These building blocks don’t sum up,
 they multiply up
  45. 45. Cross-functional teams (organized by business capabilities) Autonomy (incl. E2E responsibility) Decentralized control Microservices Continuous Delivery Heterogeneity Cloud and Containers Resilience Operations automation Craftsmanship & mastery Outcome-driven Beyond budgeting Feature flow Lean EAM Continuous improvement T-Shaped people (being empathic) DevOps Quick feedback loops Curiosity
  46. 46. #2 Know your place in the revolution
  47. 47. Take the real magic triangle …
  48. 48. You may pick two Good Fast Cheap Optimizing for quality and cycle times will result in higher costs Optimizing for quality and costs
 will result in long cycle times Optimizing for cycle times and costs will result in reduced quality
  49. 49. ... and ask for the two properties to pick
  50. 50. You may pick two Good Fast Cheap Industrial IT Deliver large batches at minimized costs
 towards slow markets Post-industrial IT Quickly adapt to ever-changing needs of dynamic, fast-moving markets Startup IT Test hypotheses and pivot as fast as possible to discover a product-market fit
  51. 51. #3 Pick the appropriate weapons
  52. 52. #4 Discuss change based on pain, not tools
  53. 53. #5 Be prepared
  54. 54. Be prepared •  Learn the tools and technologies
 of the post-industrial IT •  Keep your current skills and tools sharp •  Understand which knowledge will become
 less valuable (or even contra-productive) •  Be curious and understand the concepts outside your domain (become T-shaped) •  Improve your empathic skills!
  55. 55. add. #1 Visit the Java Forum Nord … ;)
  56. 56. add. #2 Stick to the hitchhiker‘s guide …

×