2012 Annual Report

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2012 Annual Report

  1. 1. beyond the numbers 2012 Summary Annual report Year In Review
  2. 2. Dear Friends, As I reflect on this year of our work, I am pleased to say that during a year of transition, the Economics Center has set the stage for increasing its impact in the community. We have welcomed Dr. Julie Heath as our new Director. Julie’s work with the Center’s dedicated staff Sean V. McGrory and with our committed trustees has strengthened this organization and positioned us for tremendous growth. This year, our accomplishments include training 650 educators in our professional development courses and reaching over 12,000 students who benefited from our Center’s economic and financial education programs. The Research and Consulting team of the Center has worked with high profile clients in our business community, and introduced a more custom and sophisticated approach to our client reports which now include infographics and easy-to-read summary of research findings. Mission We would be remiss in not highlighting the 35 years of visionary leadership of our founding director, Dr. George Vredeveld, who stepped down from this post this year. He has built this organization into the premier organization for teaching of economics and personal finance to elementary and high school students and teachers. What sets us apart is the way in which we conduct our work. We are dedicated to building partnerships with those who benefit from our work. This organization is a tremendous legacy of George’s work in our community. Under George’s leadership, our research division became the leading provider of economic data and analysis. On behalf of the Board of Trustees, I would like to thank those who gave their time and talent to help us make an impact. We appreciate philanthropic investments of our donors. It is their trust and support that are critical for the sustainability of our work. I would like to recognize the University of Cincinnati and the Carl H. Lindner College of Business for its academic leadership. Finally, I would like to acknowledge the commitment of the Center’s staff. I look forward to the year ahead as we focus on building and educating the next generation of leaders, creative thinkers, informed consumers, and smarter employees. THE ECONOMICS CENTER IS THE REGION’S NUMBER ONE RESOURCE FOR ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL EDUCATION AND INFORMATION. Community Need Economic and financial literacy is critical to the health of the economy and to corporate profitability. Students attending K-12 classrooms are the future economic drivers. The Center works to educate students and teachers, helping to build a future workforce through comprehensive and relevant economic and financial education. Our MissioN As a thought leader in the community, the Economics Center provides the knowledge building blocks for a stronger economy through economic education and research. Our student-based programs, interactive tools and professional development improve the economic and financial literacy of school children and young adults. Our research and consulting empowers business and civic leaders to make informed policy and economic development decisions. Engaging Students, Empowering Educators, Equipping Decision Makers through the Knowledge of Economics Our Impact 2011-2012 Highlights: Engaged 6,529 students, grades 4-12, throughout the state in the Stock Market Game; teaching the basics of investing, risk and diversification. Enhanced the economic education of 5,597 elementary students from 37 local elementary schools in Student Enterprise (StEP). Over 2,800 students from the Cincinnati’s urban neighborhoods participated in this entrepreneurship program. Enrolled 32 local high school juniors and seniors in the Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders (TL2) summer program, a rigorous, college-level Microeconomics course. Offered 40 different professional development teacher training courses, for grades K-12, reaching over 650 educators and selling 873 graduate credits. Completed more than 30 Research and Consulting projects for local and regional clients in the public and private sectors, totaling nearly $450,000 in revenues.
  3. 3. Community Impact: Engaging Students Student Enterprise Program (StEP) Stock Market Game StEP equips students with 21st century skills: creativity, entrepreneurship, criticalthinking, innovation, and financial responsibility. This incentive-based program encourages students to set up mini-economies in their school and to learn how to make responsible money- management choices through hands-on lessons in spending, saving, and investing. As a result of this program, students’ attendance increases, students’ attitudes improve, and learning of economics and personal finance is enhanced. The Stock Market Game is an online simulation that allows students to manage and invest a virtual portfolio of $100,000. For ten weeks, students compete against other teams to build and manage the best-performing portfolio. A few accomplishments: A few noteworthy highlights from the year: Luxottica, Klosterman Bakery, WesBanco, and Fifth Third each adopted a StEP elementary school and helped carry out the program’s activities. Community partnerships have become critical to StEP’s sustainability and have allowed the Center’s staff to expand StEP to additional schools. In May, the 6th annual Market Madness took place at the University of Cincinnati. More than 900 StEP students from 16 local schools came together to advertise, buy, and sell 26 different products from their businesses. This year, the program emphasized service-learning. Students collectively earned $4,897,251 StEP dollars and donated 5 percent of their earnings to the Freestore Food Bank, the Ronald McDonald House, and eight other local charities. D uring the fall game, the Economics Center partnered with US Bank to engage students in Princeton High School. US Bank employees served as classroom speakers. Students presented their investment portfolios to US Bank’s professionals. I n May, the Center hosted the 3rd annual regional Portfolio Challenge where top teams competed for a chance to win a trip to New York City, generously sponsored by Ohio National Financial Services, to visit Jennison, Lazard and Goldman Sachs. Over 160 students attended the Portfolio Challenge and students from Cincinnati Country Day and Cincinnati Christian School won the competition. Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders (TL2) In June, 32 high school students participated in the Center’s three-week, highly competitive, Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders (TL2) program. Each student completed a rigorous, college-level Microeconomics course. This unique course blended classroom instruction with real-world application of microeconomic concepts as students visited local businesses such as Procter & Gamble, Citibank and Luxottica.
  4. 4. Community Impact: Empowering Educators and Equipping Decision Makers Educator Professional Development Research & Consulting Division The Center’s teacher training program increases the depth of knowledge of financial and economic concepts, helps teachers integrate this content into the Common Core standards, and sharpens instructional skills. Well-trained educators are the most sustainable vehicle for reaching several thousand students each year with economic and financial education. The Research and Consulting team of the Center provides the knowledge building blocks that helps clients make better finance, policy, and economic development decisions. The Center introduced a new custom approach to research, and a more sophisticated design for reports. A few other notable accomplishments from the year: This year, 25 education leaders from 14 districts participated in the Alpaugh Scholars Leadership program, attending monthly sessions to discuss community issues such as healthcare, economic development, and social services. As a result of the generous contribution from the Alpaugh family, our community has a cadre of more informed school leaders with a better understanding of the needs of Greater Cincinnati, and a better ability to educate our future workforce. In May, the Center hosted its first “Toast to Teachers” event during Teacher Appreciation Week. The Center’s education staff met with more than 100 local educators at a social gathering to express gratitude for the contributions Cincinnati area teachers make in the lives of students. Earned nearly $450,000 in research revenue by completing economic analyses for clients from public and private sectors, including the Cincinnati Reds, Talbert House, City of Cincinnati, Western & Southern Open, Carter and The Banks, Music Hall Revitalization Corp., Community Mercy Health Partners, Environmental Protection Agency, Freedom Center, Kenton County Airport Board, Uptown Consortium, Inc., Focus on Ohio’s Future, Duke Energy, Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance, and several others. Launched the Research Fellows program, a unique opportunity for the Economics Center to collaborate with experts to add capacity to the Center’s research team. Fellows include individuals from within the University and the business community: Andy Benson of KnowledgeWorks, David Brasington of the UC Department of Economics, Carlee Escue of the UC College of Education, Elizabeth Edwards a Venture capitalist and author, Olivier Parent of the UC Department of Economics, Richard Stevie of Integral Analytics, and Margy Waller of Topos Partnership. Above: Infographic from the Economic Impact of the Western & Southern Open report. Above: Local teachers from the first “Toast to Teachers” social gathering
  5. 5. Statements of Activities for the years ended June 30, 2012 & 2011 2012 2011 Temporarily Revenues & gains Unrestricted restricted Total Revenues & gains Unrestricted Contributions 716,444 1,000,000 1,716,444 Contributions Program revenue 578,686 — 578,686 Program revenue Investment income 11,546 86,299 97,845 Investment income Loss on investments (32,243) (76,954) (109,197) Gain on investments In-kind contributions 209,406 — 209,406 In-kind contributions Net assets released Net assets released from restrictions 83,580 (83,580) — from restrictions Total revenues & gains 1,567,419 925,765 2,493,184 Total revenues & gains Temporarily restricted Total 614,388 966,754 9,442 50,440 167,514 24,725 — 104,517 99,328 — 639,113 966,754 113,959 149,768 167,514 259,007 (259,007) — 2,067,545 (30,437) 2,037,108 Expenses Program services Management & general Fundraising 1,415,015 349,789 138,254 — — — 1,415,015 349,789 138,254 Total expenses 1,903,058 — 1,903,058 Total expenses (335,639) 925,765 Net assets at beginning of year 1,047,976 1,223,519 2,271,495 Net assets at beginning of year Net assets at end of year 2,149,284 2,861,621 Net assets at end of year Change in net assets ASSETS Statements of Financial Position at June 30, 2012 & 2011 712,337 2012 2011 Cash & cash equivalents Accounts receivable, net Pledges receivable, net Investments Property & equipment, net 387,536 121,852 809,960 1,567,212 173 468,882 233,934 244,985 1,705,867 2,052 Total assets 2,886,733 2,655,720 590,126 Program services Management & general Fundraising — — — 1,434,531 307,984 142,063 1,884,578 — 1,884,578 182,967 Change in net assets 1,434,531 307,984 142,063 (30,437) 152,530 865,009 1,253,956 2,118,965 1,047,976 1,223,519 2,271,495 2012 2011 NET ASSETS 2012 2011 Payable to related party Accounts payable & accrued expenses Deferred revenue 18,199 119,291 712,337 1,047,976 6,913 — 15,434 249,500 Unrestricted Temporarily restricted 2,149,284 1,223,519 Total liabilities 25,112 384,225 Total net assets 2,861,621 2,271,495 Total liabilities & net assets 2,886,733 2,655,720 LIABILITIES These financial statements do not represent the complete set of audited financial statements for the Economics Center. A complete set of financial statements also includes the Auditor’s Report and the Footnotes to the Financial Statements, which are omitted herein. The Economics Center’s complete audited financial statements for the year ended June 30, 2012 may be obtained by visiting the Center’s web site at www.economicscenter.org. www.economicscenter.org
  6. 6. Excellence STUDENT ENTERPRISE (StEP) STUDENTS TOUR THE UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI DURING MARKET MADNESS StEP students from local elementary schools come together to buy, sell, and advertise products from their student-organized businesses. For many students, this is their first time on a college campus. www.economicscenter.org
  7. 7. National Mentoring Month January Sunday Monday Tuesday New Year’s Day Wednesday Thursday Friday 1 2 3 Saturday 4 5 Stock Market Game begins in February. Register Teams Today! www.smgohio.org 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 22 23 24 25 26 28 29 30 31 20 27 Martin Luther King Jr. Day February 2013 December 2012 S M T W T 12 National Work Harder Day F S M T W T 1 F S 1 S 2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 24 25 26 27 28 30 31
  8. 8. Investment STOCK MARKET GAME PORTFOLIO CHALLENGE WINNERS VISIT NEW YORK CITY Each year, leading Stock Market Game teams attend the regional Portfolio Challenge to present their winning investment strategies and compete for a chance to visit investment firms at a financial center in the nation. The spring game starts this month, register teams today. www.economicscenter.org
  9. 9. African American History Month February Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 1 Saturday 2 Groundhog Day Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders (TL ) Now accepting applications from high school juniors and seniors for a highly competitive, 3-week summer program. Encourage students to apply at: www.economicscenter.org/tl2 2 3 4 10 11 5 Mardi Gras 12 6 8 9 14 15 16 20 21 22 23 27 Ash Wednesday 7 28 13 Valentine’s Day National Lost Penny Day Board of Trustees Meeting 17 President’s Day 18 19 Stock Market Game 24 25 26 January 2013 S M March 2013 T W T F S 1 2 3 4 S 5 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Stock Market Game 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30 31 25 26 T W T F S 1 6 20 M 2 9 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
  10. 10. Commitment COVER ECONOMICS AND FINANCIAL EDUCATION “TEACHER OF THE YEAR” Recipients Every spring, the Economics Center hosts its Annual Awards Luncheon. At this premier business event, over 500 business leaders and educators come together to recognize teachers and students for their accomplishments throughout the year, specifically highlighting successes in economic and financial education. www.economicscenter.org
  11. 11. Women’s History Month March Sunday Monday February 2013 S M T W T F S 1 3 4 5 6 7 Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday April 2013 9 7 M T W T F 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 1 13 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 24 25 26 27 28 28 29 Annual Awards Luncheon 30 3 4 5 North Avondale Montessori • 2 8 9 15 16 22 S 1 2 8 S Saturday 23 29 30 Reserve your seat at the Annual Awards Luncheon this month. Visit www. economicscenter.org/awards for details and to register! 6 7 Roberts Academy Roberts Academy Stock Market Game Daylight Saving Time Begins 10 11 Midway School Corryville Catholic School 12 13 14 Frederick Douglass School Hays Porter Elementary Bond Hill Academy Winton Hills Academy World Consumer Rights Day Stock Market Game St. Patrick’s Day 17 18 Oyler School 19 Pleasant Ridge Montessori Williams Avenue Elementary 20 Amity Elementary St. Boniface School 21 Rees E. Price Academy Stock Market Game Palm Sunday 24 25 Pleasant Hill Academy 26 27 Holy Family Catholic School Stock Market Game Easter Sunday 31 denotes school stores 28 Good Friday
  12. 12. Engagement STUDENT ENTERPRISE STUDENTS BUY, SELL, AND ADVERTISE PRODUCTS AT MARKET MADNESS Student-organized businesses are created to teach fundamental work concepts such as earning a paycheck, understanding employer expectations and earning rewards for positive classroom behaviors and academic improvement. www.economicscenter.org
  13. 13. Financial Literacy Month April Sunday Monday April Fool’s Day 1 Tuesday Wednesday 2 Thursday Friday Saturday 3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 19 20 26 27 Reading Central Elementary Stock Market Game 7 8 9 Stock Market Game 14 Tax Day 15 16 17 18 David Ricardo’s birthday Financial Education Conference • Stock Market Game 21 Earth Day 22 23 24 25 Stock Market Game 28 29 30 March 2013 S Annual Conference on Financial Education is April 3rd-5th in Orlando, Florida. M T W May 2013 T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 denotes school stores S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
  14. 14. Dedication JOIN US FOR “A TOAST TO TEACHERS” DURING TEACHER APPRECIATION WEEK “Thank you to the Economics Center staff for hosting a wonderful event. It was nice to meet some new teacher friends. I am new to attending your classes and events, but I can tell you that I am very impressed. You have a top quality organization.” - Roberta Phillips, Miami Valley CTC Instructor A 2012 “Toast to Teachers” Attendee www.economicscenter.org
  15. 15. Mental Health Awareness Month May Sunday Monday W Wednesday June 2013 April 2013 T Tuesday S M T F S 1 2 3 4 5 8 9 10 11 12 13 M T W T F 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 8 S Friday 9 Saturday 3 4 10 11 National Penny Day 8 15 6 7 S Thursday 1 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 9 10 11 12 13 14 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 28 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 5 6 Bond Hill Academy Winton Hills Academy Mother’s Day 12 Midway School Corryville Catholic School 13 Frederick Douglass School Hays Porter Elementary 19 20 Oyler School 26 Memorial Day 7 14 North Avondale Montessori 21 Pleasant Ridge Montessori Williams Avenue Elementary 27 28 Holy Family Catholic School denotes school stores Roberts Academy “A Toast to Teachers” Happy Hour 15 • 16 Stock Market Game Portfolio Challenge • 17 Armed Forces Day 18 Reading Central Elementary Pleasent Hill Academy Market Madness • 22 Amity Elementary St. Boniface School 29 23 24 Rees E. Price Academy 30 31 25
  16. 16. Leadership Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders (Tl2) students visit Procter & gamble TL2 students participate in a 3-week summer program at UC and are enrolled in Microeconomics, earning college credit. During the program, students tour leading companies such as P&G, Ford Motor Plant, and Citibank to learn about their operations. www.economicscenter.org
  17. 17. National Safety Month June Sunday M F S 1 S May 2013 T W T 3 Monday 4 2 M F 2 4 5 Tuesday Wednesday S 1 S July 2013 T W T 6 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 26 27 28 29 30 31 28 29 30 Friday Saturday 1 Teachers! Check out our unique professional development opportunities this Summer. 13 12 Thursday 31 Superintendents, Principals, Administrators, apply for the Alpaugh Scholars Leadership Program. It begins in October. www.economicscenter.org 2 3 4 9 10 11 John Keynes’ birthday 5 6 12 13 20 7 8 Flag Day 14 15 First Day of Summer 21 22 28 29 Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders (TL2) Summer Program Father’s Day Adam Smith’s birthday 16 17 18 19 Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders (TL2) Summer Program 23 24 25 26 Today’s Learners, Tomorrow’s Leaders (TL2) Summer Program 30 27
  18. 18. Integrity Managing a school store teaches real skills Quarterly school stores allow students to make decisions whether to buy products, save their money, or donate. Through this process, students learn money management skills, how to set and achieve goals, and gain insights into how the economy works. www.economicscenter.org
  19. 19. Social Wellness Month July Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday 1 2 3 7 8 9 14 15 21 28 Thursday Friday Saturday 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 31 Independence Day Alfred Marshall’s birthday June 2013 S M T W August 2013 T F S S M T W 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 T F S 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
  20. 20. Community tODAY’S LEARNERS, TOMORROW’S LEADER’S (tl2) STUDENTS VISIT UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL “This experience made me realize that firms face many challenges when entering any market. I also learned how to think critically when it comes to managing and using money.” - Jack, St. Xavier High School www.economicscenter.org
  21. 21. National Immunization Awareness Month August Sunday Monday September 2013 July 2013 M T W T F S S 1 S Tuesday M T W T F 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 9 10 11 12 13 S 14 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 28 29 30 31 29 Thursday 30 Friday Saturday 1 Back to school! Check out new teacher training opportunities. 7 8 Wednesday 2 3 8 9 10 Apply today for the Alpaugh Scholars Leadership Program. 4 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31 25 National Women’s Equality Day National Dollar Day
  22. 22. Engaging stock market game students present at the annual portfolio challenge Participation in the Stock Market Game improves student performance in mathematics and increases financial literacy. Studies show that these students do better on a personal finance test than their peers. www.economicscenter.org
  23. 23. National School Success Month September Sunday 1 Monday Tuesday First Day of Autumn 3 8 9 10 15 Grandparent’s Day 2 16 22 23 29 30 Wednesday Labor Day Constitution Day Thursday Friday Saturday 4 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 Patriot Day October 2013 August 2013 REMINDER: Stock Market Game starts in October. Register Teams Today! www.smgohio.org Alpaugh Scholars Leadership Program Now accepting applications from education leaders. www.economicscenter.org S M T W T F S 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 25 19 26 20 27 21 28 M 22 29 23 30 24 31 T W T F 1 3 11 18 S 2 3 4 S 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
  24. 24. Partnerships ALPAUGH SCHOLARS LEADERSHIP PROGRAM (October - february) Join this impressive group of community-oriented educators and administrators to learn about current business, economic, and social issues in our schools and communities. Over 200 local education leaders are alumni. Submit your application today! www.economicscenter.org
  25. 25. Financial Planning Month October Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday 1 Thursday Friday Saturday 2 3 4 5 9 10 11 12 16 17 18 19 23 24 25 26 Stock Market Game 6 7 8 Stock Market Game 13 Columbus Day 14 Economic Sciences Nobel Award winner announced 15 Stock Market Game 20 21 22 Stock Market Game 27 28 29 30 Halloween 31 November 2013 September 2013 S M T W T 14 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 20 21 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 27 28 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 22 23 24 25 26 29 30 F S 1 7 8 Stock Market Game S 2
  26. 26. Charity Student enterprise (stEP) STUDENTS GIVE BACK TO THOSE IN NEED At Market Madness, StEP students have the opportunity to use their hard-earned school cash to donate to the Freestore Food Bank, the Ronald McDonald House, YMCA and many other local charities. In addition to financial skills, StEP provides character education. www.economicscenter.org
  27. 27. Native American Heritage Month November Sunday Monday October 2013 S M T W T 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 Tuesday Wednesday Thursday December 2013 F S S 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 12 8 9 10 11 12 13 All Saints’ Day 7 11 14 M T W T F S 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 27 28 29 30 31 29 30 31 Daylight Saving Time Ends 3 Saturday 1 2 Jump$tart National Conference is November 2nd - 4th in Orlando, FL. 21 20 Friday Stock Market Game 4 Election Day 5 6 7 8 9 13 14 15 16 20 21 22 23 28 29 30 Board of Trustees Meeting Stock Market Game 10 Veteran’s Day 11 12 Stock Market Game 17 18 19 Stock Market Game 24 25 26 Hanukkah Begins Stock Market Game 27 Thanksgiving Day
  28. 28. Inspiring COVER engaging students THROUGH THE KNOWLEDGE OF PERSONAL FINANCE AND ECONOMICS “Every child needs a little help, a little hope, and someone to believe in them,” says Dr. Val Krugh, Economics Center’s Director of School Relations www.economicscenter.org
  29. 29. Universal Human Rights Month December Sunday 1 Monday Tuesday 2 Wednesday 3 Thursday Friday 4 5 6 Saturday 7 Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Stock Market Game 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 New Year’s Eve 31 Christmas Day 14 28 January 2014 November 2013 S M T W T 3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 25 26 27 21 First Day of Winter F S 1 2 8 14 21 28 S M T W T 9 5 6 7 15 16 12 13 22 23 19 20 29 30 26 27 F S 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 14 15 16 17 18 21 22 23 24 25 28 29 30 31
  30. 30. Individual Donors Mr. Peter A. Alpaugh Anonymous Harry and Anne Badanes Michael and Nancy Baker Tom and Carol Barefield Mr. & Mrs. David L. Belew Mr. Daniel Bennie Mr. Robert W. Buechner Chris & Vivienne Carlson Diane and William Carney Edward F. Castleberry Charlie & Joan Cerino Mr. Anthony Cole Kathleen C. Daly Gary and Marjorie Davies Richard and Theresa Davis Mr. Gerald J. DeBrunner Mr. Ronald J. Dolan Dennis Donlan Mr. David Durham Mr. Charles Fisher Mr. John J. Frank, Jr. Chris & Angela Habel Kathy Hamm Douglas and Diana Haskell Julie Heath Mr. David & Cynthia Jackson Barbara Johnson Dr. Tom and Jane Kessinger Mr. Marvin Kolodzik Adrijana & Stefan Kowatsch Dr. Valerie Krugh Margaret Lawson Ms. Claire Luby Thomas and Lorie MacDonald David Macejko Mr. Andrew McCreanor Ms. Diana McHenry Bill and Karen Neyer Dr. Cora Ogle Ms. Joan Peck Gordon and Lorrie Penner Mr. Barry Porter Thank you to our Contributors Mr. & Mrs. Dale D. Rayney Jane Juracek-Reherman & John Reherman Jeff & Theda Rexhausen Ken Richter Mr. Wm. T. (Bill) Robinson III Jim & Susan Russell Dr. Jennifer Shand W. Philip Shepardson, Jr. Ms. Jaclyn Smith Katherine and Tim Stautberg Jennifer Stein Mr. Scott Stubbins Carol G. Talbot Ms. Jennifer R. Taunton Woodrow & Barbara Uible Ms. Margaret Valentine Dr. Nelson Vincent Dr. George M. Vredeveld Don Weston Van and Robin White Mr. Steven A. Wilson Mr. And Mrs. Allen Zaring, III Susan Zaunbrecher Business and Foundation Donors Al Neyer Inc. The Alpaugh Family Foundation Anonymous Anonymous Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation Bailey Capital Partners Cassidy Turley Charles H. Dater Foundation The Cincinnati Enquirer Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber Clark Schaefer Hackett & Co. Council for Economic Education Deloitte & Touche LLP Delta Tau Delta Educational Foundation Dinsmore & Shohl LLP EMC Insurance Companies Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland The Fifth Third Bank First Financial Bancorp Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. Friends of Dater Montessori Frisch’s Restaurants, Inc. Frost Brown Todd LLC Gamma Xi 21 Corporation Goldman, Sachs & Co. Great Traditions Development Group The Greater Cincinnati Foundation Horan Associates The Huntington National Bank Institute for Supply Management J D Cloud Company LLP John Cranley Co. Johnson Investment Council, Inc Keating Muething & Klekamp Key Bank Khoury Family Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation KnowledgeWorks Lenox Wealth Management Louise Taft Semple Foundation LPK Luxottica Retail Macy’s Malcolm & Ruth Myers Family Fund Manuel D. & Rhoda Mayerson Foundation Marvin Lewis Community Fund MCF Advisors Mercurio Construction LLC Messer Construction Company Neyer Foundation Northpointe Realty Services LLC Northwestern Mutual- The Kelley Financial Group Ohio National Financial Services Ohio National Foundation Pepper Family Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation PNC Bank Port of Greater Cincinnati Development Authority Qfact Marketing Research, LLC Ronald McDonald House Charities Global Ronald McDonald House Charities of Greater Cincinnati Salescore Inc. Salesforce Foundation Scripps Howard Foundation Seasons Management Company LLC SIFMA Foundation State Farm Insurance Taft, Stettinius & Hollister LLP Thompson Hine LLP Trio Bistro United Way of Greater Cincinnati University of Cincinnati University of Cincinnati, Carl H. Lindner College of Business University of Cincinnati, Carl H. Lindner College of Business, Economics Department University of Cincinnati, College of Design, Architecture, Art, & Planning University of Cincinnati, Diversity Council The University of Cincinnati Foundation Uptown Consortium US Bank Vehr Communications, LLC Western & Southern Financial Fund The William P. Anderson Foundation Wood Herron & Evans LLP The Zaring Family Foundation
  31. 31. Board of Trustees Peter A. Alpaugh Cincinnati Equitable Insurance Thomas A. Barefield Ohio National Financial Services Douglas Bolton Cassidy Turley T. Brian Brockhoff Bailey Capital Partners Tony T. Brown T. Brown Consulting Group Mark Cinquina PNC Real Estate Banking Richard O. Coleman NextLevel Transportation Services Michael J. Conaton The Midland Company Warren C. Falberg Cincinnati, Ohio Crystal L. Faulkner Cooney Faulkner & Stevens, LLC Michael Fox Deloitte & Touche LLP John J. Frank, Jr. Cassidy Turley Christopher S. Habel Frost Brown Todd Kathy Hamm Principled Wealth Advisors, LLC Terence L. Horan Horan Associates, Inc Adrienne James Sycamore Community Schools Donald Kaplan Kaplan, Litwin, Kaplan & Associates Shawn F. Kelley Northwestern Mutual Financial Network Lisa Kuethe Huntington Bank Margaret Lawson Taft Stettinius & Hollister, LLP Sean V. McGrory Clark, Schaefer, Hackett Advisory Board Howard McIlvain LPK William L. Neyer Al Neyer, Inc. Barry Porter Cincinnati, Ohio Jim Rigg Archdiocese of Cincinnati William T. (Bill) Robinson III Frost Brown Todd Mary Ronan Cincinnati Public Schools James Russell US Bank Andrew Sathe MCF Advisors Timothy E. Stautberg The E. W. Scripps Company Jennifer Stein Cincinnati, OH David M. Szymanski University of Cincinnati Carol G. Talbot Cincinnati, Ohio Howard J. Taragano Macy’s, Inc. Woodrow Uible Bartlett & Co. Margaret K. Valentine Valentine Research Ellen G. van der Horst Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber Nick Vehr Vehr Communications, LLC Rea Waldon Urban League of Greater Cincinnati Roberta A. White Great Oaks Institute of Technology Susan Zaunbrecher Dinsmore & Shohl Edmund J. Adams Terrance L. Ashanta-Barker Michael D. Baker John F. Barrett David Belew Adrian Breen J. Michael Brandt Lawrence H. Braun Diane C. Carney Samuel M. Cassidy Edward F. Castleberry Charles A. Cerino Raymond R. Clark Phillip R. Cox Kathleen C. Daly Richard K. Davis Michael A. Fisher J. Jeffrey Edmondson Jerry M. Galvin Bill O’Gara Victoria Gluckman Lawrence L. Grypp J. Joseph Hale, Jr. Carrie Hayden Tom Heekin Barbara B. Henshaw Robert L. Hoverson Thomas H. Humes David A. Jackson Jane Juracek-Reherman Ralph Katerberg Jan-Michele Lemon Kearney Kathleen L. Klink Charles P. Koch Marvin Kolodzik Pranav G. Kothari Donald D. Larson Charles D. Lindberg Gary Lindgren James M. Lippert Stephen MacConnell Ronald H. McSwain Donor Spotlight Juanita Mills Quentin Nesbitt Michael B. Packard Stan Pontius Ronald B. Raley Dale D. Rayney Jeff Rosen Fritz A. Russ Donald E. Schmidt James E. Schwab William P. Sheehan David O. Smith Tom A. Steele Barbara J. Stonebraker Michael A. Webb John R. Westheimer Donald E. Weston Harry M. Whipple Chad P. Wick Wayne R. Wickens Robert P. Wiwi John H. Wyant Allen G. Zaring Mr. PETER ALPAUGH A special thank you to the Alpaugh Family Foundation The Alpaugh Family Foundation contributed $1,000,000 to the George Vredeveld Legacy Fund to establish the Center’s i-learning initiative. The goal of this initiative is to provide online economics and personal finance training for elementary and high school students and teachers both regionally and across the nation. The Alpaugh family has been committed to the mission of economic and financial education of our teachers for the past 35 years. The Alpaugh Family Foundation also funds the Alpaugh Scholars Leadership Program each year, providing educators the opportunity to engage with community leaders and discuss economic issues. “The new i-Learning program will allow us to expand our reach exponentially to assist more K-12 educators,” said Dr. Julie Heath, Economics Center Director. “Mr. Alpaugh’s gift will be used to leverage resources and experts in online economics education to most efficiently develop our own online platform. Educators will be able to look to us to provide a one-stop portal for economic and financial education resources.” Below: Alpaugh Leadership Program Class
  32. 32. Support Your Economics Center 90 West Daniels Cincinnati, OH 45221-0023 513.556.2948 www.economicscenter.org We’ve already taught economics and personal finance to 1,000,000 students. Will you help us reach the next 1,000,000? After three and a half decades of work, the Economics Center has trained thousands of teachers, developed countless classroom materials and teaching resources, and impacted one million students through innovative school programs that foster and support knowledge of the economy, entrepreneurship and personal financial literacy. Rapid changes in our economy and the workplace demand a more contemporary set of skills from young individuals entering the workforce. Our work allows teachers to effectively equip their students with the skills they will need for life. Knowledge of economics and financial education has the power to transform one’s life and improve decision-making. It is with a focus on creating an informed future generation that we are laying a solid foundation for urban economic growth. To join our effort, please support the Center at www.economicscenter.org/give. Staff Julie Heath, PhD President and Director Claire Luby Development Officer Jaclyn Smith Director, Marketing Douglas Haskell Director, Professional Development Ben Passty, PhD Research Assistant Professor Casey Woodruff Director, Student and Community Relations Sue Heilmayer Accountant Lorrie Penner Executive Assistant George Vredeveld, PhD Director, Research Erin Harris Director, Student Enterprise Michael Jones, PhD Research Assistant Professor Adrijana Kowatsch Chief Operating Officer Jeff Rexhausen Research Associate Valerie Krugh, PhD Director, School Relations Stephen Samuels Director, Business Development

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