Behavior change project

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Behavior Change Project Information

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Behavior change project

  1. 1. Behavior Change Project Steps and Resources Dr. Mary Little Jillian Gourwitz
  2. 2. Step 1: Choosing Your Student• Select a student that you feel needs assistance with increasing or decreasing social behavior. – Examples may include: gaining teacher’s attention, transitioning between subjects and/or classes, interacting with peers, class participation ,ect.• Include a short description of the student providing relevant behavioral information. Relevant information should include the student’s age, gender, grade level, academic levels, as well as, a review of the student’s records. • Resource- Record Review Form
  3. 3. Step 2: Operationally Define BehaviorInstead of calling this a “Temper Tantrum” how would you operationally definethis child’s behavior?Possible Operational Definition: child lies on the floor and cries out.
  4. 4. Step 3: Answer the following questions and generate your hypothesis• Under what circumstances is the problem behavior most likely or least likely to be observed? (where, when, who, what, why)• What consequences or results predictably follow the problem behavior? (What do they get? What do they avoid?)• What other issues are important influences on the behavior? Resource- ABC Charts ABC Recording Form Student: Time Begin: Observer: Time End: Date: _____________________ ABC recording involves documenting the student s behavior and the events that immediately precede and fol l ow it. T h e m ore specific and precise t he descripti on, t he m o r e useful t he dat a will b e. A - Antecedents B - Behavior C - Consequences describe activity and specific describe exactly what the describe events that followed events preceding the behavior student said or did or results of the behavior (e.g., specific interactions) (e.g., reprimands, d e l a y s in activit y) Example from Video
  5. 5. Steps 4-7• Provide the rationale for selection of the problem behavior. Why is it important or necessary for this behavior to be changed.The child cannot lie on the floor and cry out for attention in public.• Operationally define what the Replacement behavior should look like FOLLOWING your intervention.The child will walk up to his parent and tap them on the leg.• Write a COMPLETE behavioral objective for the replacement behavior.The child will walk up to his parent and tap them on the leg, to gain theirattention, without prompting on 4 out of 5 observations.• Identify the student’s characteristics and strengths the will facilitate the behavior change – Resource- Student Interest Inventory
  6. 6. Step 8: Develop a Behavior Support Team• Determine who should be on the team.• Consider different environments and resources.
  7. 7. Step 9 and 10: Data Collection and Baseline Data • Identify the appropriate system of data collection. • Provide a rationale for the selection of this method. • Attach a copy of the data collection sheet. • Collect baseline data for at least 3 days or 5 data collection sessions. – Resource- Data Collection Forms Duration Recording Event Recording Interval Recording Latency Recording Time Sampling Student: _ _____________________ Observer: ___ ______________________ Student: _______________________________ Observer: ___________________________ Student: ________________________________ Observer: _________________________ Setting: __ ________________ School: ___ ______________________ Student: _____________________________ Observer: _____________________________ Student: ____________________________ Observer: _____________________________ Setting: ________________________________ School: ___________________________ Setting: ________________________________ School: _____________________________ Target Behavior: ____________________________________________________ Setting: _____________________________ School: _______________________________ Target Behavior: ___________________________________________________________ Target Behavior: ____________________________________________________________ Setting: _____________________________ School: _______________________________ Definition: Target Behavior: ____________________________________________________________ Definition: ________________________________________________________________ Stimulus Cue: _______________________________________________________________ Target Behavior (1): ________________________________________________________ Definition: _________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Date: Time Begin: Total Total Time: Behavior Starts: _____________________________________________________________ Definition (1): ______________________________________________________________ Type: Partial Interval or Whole Interval Length of Interval: _____ Frequency: Date Time Begin: Total Latency: Length of Sampling Unit: ______________ Second Student: _______________________ Date Time Begin: Total Duration: Date: Number of + Rate (Frequency / Time): Time End: Student: Time End: Average Duration: Time End: Average Latency: Time Begin: Total Intervals Number of +: Date: Time Begin: Total Frequency Total Time Date Time Begin: Total Duration: Date Time Begin: Total Latency: Date: Rate (Frequency / Time) Time End: % of Intervals Total Samples: Time End: Average Duration: Time End: Time End: Average Latency: Time Begin: Date: Time Begin: Total Frequency Total Time Date: Number of + % of Samples: Date Time Begin: Total Duration: Date Time Begin: Total Latency: Time End: Time End: Average Duration: Rate (Frequency / Time) Time End: Time Begin: Total Intervals Time End: Average Latency: Date: Time Begin: Total Frequency Total Time Student: Date Time Begin: Total Duration: Time End: % of Intervals Date Time Begin: Total Latency: Number of +: Time End: Average Duration: Rate (Frequency / Time) Time End: Date: Number of + Time End: Average Latency: Date: Total Samples: Date Time Begin: Total Duration: Date: Time Begin: Total Frequency Total Time Time Begin: Time Begin: Total Intervals Date Time Begin: Total Latency: Time End: Average Duration: % of Samples Time End: Rate (Frequency / Time) Time End: Time End: Average Latency: Time End: % of IntervalsDuration Recording Event Recording Interval Recording Latency Recording Time Sampling Example from Video
  8. 8. Steps 11 and 12• Develop a behavioral intervention strategy• Implement the intervention and collect data for at least a week• Provide graph documenting the intervention – Resources: link to behavioral intervention website and video for graphing data.
  9. 9. Steps 13 and 14• Analyze the data and determine the effectiveness of the intervention• Identify 3 strategies you may use to ensure generalization and maintenance. Appropriately gain Appropriately gain attention in the attention in the Appropriately gain classroom. cafeteria. attention at recess.
  10. 10. References Data Collection FormsReceived from EEX 6612. Martin, S. & Vasquez, E. Imagespenavan.edublogs.orgbusiness.phillipmartin.infolakeshorelearning.comClipartof.com Websiteshttp://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/http://www.pbis.orghttp://www.interventioncentral.comhttp://florida-rti.org VideoVasquez, E. (2010). University of Central Floridahttp://dl.dropbox.com/u/32985435/Excell2007.mp4http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpSfThUv_pc

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