The White Collar Warrior
Practical Self-Protection Advice
for Busy Professionals
By Tyrone Turner
2nd Degree Black Belt
L E G A L D I S C L A I M E R
Author: Tyrone Turner
Email: tyroneturner1@gmail.com
All rights reserved. No part of this bo...
The author is not an official spokesperson for any of the
organizations discussed in this paper. The intent is to share
in...
T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
DEDICATION
SPECIAL THANKS
THE WARRIOR’S CODE
INTRODUCTION
PICKING A SCHOOL ...
A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S
The following gentlemen have helped make me the martial artist that I
am today and the one...
D E D I C A T I O N
This book is entitled to all of the hard-working, over 40 years of
age, martial artist who have demand...
S P E C I A L T H A N K S
Thank you to my best friend, who is more of a big brother, my main
martial arts instructor, Davi...
T H E W A R R I O R ’ S C O D E
The picture to the right is called “The Chase at Rattlesnake
Springs,” by Don Stivers.
Thi...
“The Warrior’s Code”
By Tyrone Turner
Copyright 2012
All rights reserved
Be a peacekeeper.
Do not provoke anyone
to war ag...
Principle-based and
not technique-centered. In fights,
there are no givens.
Prepare for it all
because you know not what m...
Sticks, saps, chains and whips.
Pocket sticks, pocket knives and
Griffin Grips™. Good deals.
Spears and tomahawks.
Cross b...
He is my martial
great-grandfather. He is the
Sanuces founder.
My grandfather is
Soke Chaka Zulu whom
laid a solid base.
K...
Be gentle in life.
Be ferocious in combat.
The warrior’s code.
I N T R O D U C T I O N
This white paper is actually my thesis for being promoted to 2nd
degree
black belt in Jujutsu unde...
that you have to teach people things that are simple to do and are
easily understood. It has to be that way because under ...
P I C K I N G A S C H O O L O R I N S T R U C T O R
Picking the right school or instructor is simple when you focus on
wha...
tonfa, sai, nunchaku, and kama), but they are illegal in many places.
The aforementioned weapons are most certainly here i...
I have also had the good fortune to train a few times (more to come in
the future) with Martial Blade Concepts™ Certified ...
A W A R E N E S S A N D C O M M O N S E N S E
When I was in Army Basic Training back in 1992, one of the mantras we
would ...
and q’s and avoid danger. Years ago when I was a green belt, I
remember walking down the street on my way to class jamming...
C O N D I T I O N I N G
Look, you don’t have to become an Olympic-level athlete, but most of
us certainly have to be in de...
need to spend so much time doing calisthenics and such. That should be
done on the student’s own time. Skills work must ta...
P H Y S I C A L P R I N C I P L E S
The way I was taught martial arts is to focus more on principles
rather than on techni...
of travel, you really break their balance and have control of their
body. We take special care when practicing these techn...
H A P P Y L A N D I N G S
Before you start learning how to throw people, you must first learn
how to have “happy landings”...
This break-fall helps you from hurting your tail bone and your spine.
This is the go-to fall if you are scoop slammed or o...
F I V E F O C U S A R E A S
The way I was trained is to work toward mastery of five techniques in
five categories. There i...
my palm. The jab, cross, hook, uppercut, and overhand can all be done
as a palm strike.
Slap
I’m talking about using a rel...
Kicks
There are some fancy kicks out there. I suggest that you keep them
basic and low. Depending on what you are wearing ...
pictured below.
Side
Like the front kick, focus on using the heel of your foot. The brand
of Jujutsu that I have my black ...
you’re good money.
Joint Lock Takedowns
In Japanese joint-locking arts like Jujutsu or Aikido, the
understanding of levers...
Goose Neck
You use your mirror reflection hand (e.g., you grab his right hand
with your left hand) to grab the entire side...
There is an old saying in Judo: “Thou shalt not attack a judoka
because the earth will rise up and smite thee across thy b...
Double Arm Shoulder
This is the top scoring throw in competition Judo. It requires good
timing and some muscle, but it is ...
Elbows
Ouch! Elbows really hurt and bust someone up. They are great follow-
throughs after palm strikes or other open hand...
P A R T N E R D R I L L S
In the BuddhaStrike Combatives Method, we don’t spend time doing kata
(prearranged forms) as we ...
things with joint locking. We call this “Locksmithing.” For instance,
we practice moving from one lock to another on an op...
Soke Zulu says it best, “Creeps are like grapes because they come in
bunches.” Therefore, you have to do some drills where...
S O L O D R I L L S
Shadow fighting
Take a page from boxers and shadowbox. Rather, shadow fight. This way
you can practice...
While the rope is flexible, the rattan ring is not. Therefore you have
to learn how to work around resistance. I’m okay wi...
I M P A C T T R A I N I N G
If you’re not hitting something, you are not really training. The
impact of hitting something ...
L E S S – T H A N – L E T H A L ,
L E G A L – T O – C A R R Y W E A P O N R Y
The below YouTube videos highlight the use o...
R E S O U R C E S
BuddhaStrike YouTube Channel www.youtube.com/buddhastrike
Martial Blade Concepts™ www.martialbladeconcep...
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This was my thesis for promotion to 2nd degree black belt in Jujutsu.

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The white collar warrior

  1. 1. The White Collar Warrior Practical Self-Protection Advice for Busy Professionals By Tyrone Turner 2nd Degree Black Belt
  2. 2. L E G A L D I S C L A I M E R Author: Tyrone Turner Email: tyroneturner1@gmail.com All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage or retrieval system without written permission from the author, except for the inclusion of brief quotations in a review. Disclaimer The author, advisors no any of the resources named in this white paper shall have neither liability nor responsibility to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused by any of the techniques or devices mentioned directly or indirectly in this book. The author does not claim any credit for any of the physical principles or drills described in this report. Proper credit is to the rightful innovator(s).
  3. 3. The author is not an official spokesperson for any of the organizations discussed in this paper. The intent is to share information and to offer perspectives on self-protection. Copyright © 2013 by Tyrone Turner First Edition United States of America
  4. 4. T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS DEDICATION SPECIAL THANKS THE WARRIOR’S CODE INTRODUCTION PICKING A SCHOOL OR INSTRUCTOR AWARENESS AND COMMON SENSE CONDITIONING PHYSICAL PRINCIPLES HAPPY LANDINGS FIVE FOCUS AREAS DRILLS SOLO DRILLS LESS-THAN-LETHAL, LEGAL-TO-CARRY WEAPONRY IMPACT TRAINING RECOMMENDED RESOURCES
  5. 5. A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S The following gentlemen have helped make me the martial artist that I am today and the one that I hope to become: Soke Chaka Zulu, Zujitsu Martial Arts Soke Bob Martin, Unified Force Martial Arts Hachidan Roman Lutak, USA National Delegate, United Nations of Jiu Jitsu Renshi David S. Bunch (“Sensei Buddha”), BuddhaStrike Combatives Master Michael Griffin, Griffin Martial Training, Inventor of the Griffin Grip™ Grandmaster Moran, American Pressure Point Self-Defense System and inventor of the Sharpshooter Keychain™ I do not speak to these gentlemen on a regular basis and some I have not spoken to for years. Nonetheless, I would be remiss if I didn’t pay homage to those who have put me on the warrior path.
  6. 6. D E D I C A T I O N This book is entitled to all of the hard-working, over 40 years of age, martial artist who have demanding jobs and family responsibilities. I know that it is not easy, but keep on training and be all that you can be.
  7. 7. S P E C I A L T H A N K S Thank you to my best friend, who is more of a big brother, my main martial arts instructor, David S. Bunch. We all know him affectionately as Sensei Buddha. You are a great teacher and a cherished friend.
  8. 8. T H E W A R R I O R ’ S C O D E The picture to the right is called “The Chase at Rattlesnake Springs,” by Don Stivers. This poem is a series of 18 haiku poems that are strung together in a series to tell a story. I call this style that I created a haiku chain poem. According to Dictionary.com, a haiku is a major form of Japanese verse, written in 17 syllables divided into 3 lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables, and employing highly evocative allusions and comparisons, often on the subject of nature or one of the seasons; or a poem written in this form. This poem is dedicated to the warriors who have influenced me as a martial artist. Special thanks to Soke Chaka Zulu, Hachidan Roman Lutak, Renshi David Bunch (aka, “Sensei Buddha”), and Master Michael Griffin. _______________________________
  9. 9. “The Warrior’s Code” By Tyrone Turner Copyright 2012 All rights reserved Be a peacekeeper. Do not provoke anyone to war against you. As the Swiss nation understands, prepare for war and peace will be yours. Empty-handed skills. Weaponry. Stealth. Surveillance. Calm under all stress.
  10. 10. Principle-based and not technique-centered. In fights, there are no givens. Prepare for it all because you know not what may come your way one day. Striking defeats joint locks and grabs. Clinching beats strikes. Joint locks beat clinching. Falling is an art form. To know how to fall helps avoid breaks and scrapes.
  11. 11. Sticks, saps, chains and whips. Pocket sticks, pocket knives and Griffin Grips™. Good deals. Spears and tomahawks. Cross bows, boomerangs, throwing stars and sling shots. Guns. Africa, Asia, Europe, the Americas, and Pacific isles. All gave birth to some form of combat method of self-preservation. North America gave rise to great masters. Like Grandmaster Powell.
  12. 12. He is my martial great-grandfather. He is the Sanuces founder. My grandfather is Soke Chaka Zulu whom laid a solid base. Kyoshi Lutak helped forge fighting spirit in me. School of hard knocks. Renshi Buddha is who has opened my eyes to possibilities. I will continue to train to become the best that I can become.
  13. 13. Be gentle in life. Be ferocious in combat. The warrior’s code.
  14. 14. I N T R O D U C T I O N This white paper is actually my thesis for being promoted to 2nd degree black belt in Jujutsu under the instruction of Renshi David S. Bunch (“Sensei Buddha”) He required me to document a unit plan on the core techniques and teaching methodology of my training. He gave me permission to share this with the public as it is hoped that it can be a great primer for starting and/or continuing one’s martial arts training. Particularly for those who are busy working people with families that are over 40 years of age. When you are juggling the responsibilities of work and family life, and on top of that you’re not as young as you used to be, martial arts training doesn’t seem to be something that you can fit into your schedule. However, I’d dare say that if you really love yourself and your family, you should take measures to make sure that you can protect yourself and your loved ones. When you carve off all of the unnecessary things, you indeed make time to get your training in. I don’t fault people for not pursuing martial arts training. Over the years, I have grown very dismayed and disappointed with what some martial arts teachers pass off to their students. I have seen some things being taught that will get people killed in the real world. The attacks and scenarios are unrealistic and there is zero danger – punches are thrown so far from the intended target that they would miss by a mile if they finished their trajectory. You got to get a little “love tap” here and there to keep you honest. Also, I believe
  15. 15. that you have to teach people things that are simple to do and are easily understood. It has to be that way because under stress, adrenaline robs you of your fine motor skills. The goal of this paper is to give people practical advice on self- protection. I do not consider myself an expert, but I can certainly take care of myself and my loved ones. I am always open to learning new things and welcome critique so that I can become a better martial artist and a better person overall. This paper is by no means intended to be a comprehensive text on the martial arts. I just want to provoke thought and give you some things to think about. Remember what the late, great Bruce Lee said: “Absorb what is useful. Discard what is not. Add to it what is your own.” Now, let’s hit the training floor. Enjoy!
  16. 16. P I C K I N G A S C H O O L O R I N S T R U C T O R Picking the right school or instructor is simple when you focus on what you really want. What makes things difficult is that most people don’t know what they want. Work to develop a very clear picture of what you want and why you are training in the martial arts in the first place. Being that you’re reading this paper, I will presume that you are a busy professional with a family that is interested in self- defense. Here are a few things to consider when picking a self-defense school or an instructor: Do you train in street clothes are do you dress up in traditional Asian uniforms? There is nothing wrong with wearing a gi and going barefoot is that is your thing. However, when training for real-world self-defense, you probably want to train in what you’ll most likely be wearing outside of the training hall – shoes included. Personally, I like training while wearing cargo pants or jeans and a tee-shirt and sneakers. Sometimes I train wearing an old suit or while in business- casual clothing while wearing dress shoes. Are you training with less-than-lethal, legal-to-carry weaponry? Weapons are a great equalizer and should most certainly be part of your training. I nice whack with a pocket stick makes the youngest, most virile man a wuss very quickly. I implore you to train with something that you can actually carry around in the streets. There is nothing wrong with training with let’s say, kobudo weaponry (e.g.,
  17. 17. tonfa, sai, nunchaku, and kama), but they are illegal in many places. The aforementioned weapons are most certainly here in my native New York. I am a huge fan of the Griffin Grip™, pocket sticks, and the Sharpshooter Keychain™. Can the bulk of your training be done at home? That is to say, can you train at home alone doing solo drills and such? Heck, there are even some partner drills that can be done alone if you use your imagination. Michael Janich of Martial Blade Concepts™ gives some great ideas on how to accomplish this in his videos. Hey, if you absolutely have to be in the school on a regular basis because your training is dependent on interacting with others on a regular basis (e.g., a grappling gym), you should reevaluate why you’re training. Also, Miyama-Ryu Senior Instructor, D’Arcy Rahming, has a great solo training dummy that you can make at home. He calls it “Mr. Coat.” CLICK HERE to download his great white paper on this training tool. Can you go to intensive yet focused seminars, or get small group, or private instruction that has a beginning and an ending? What I mean is can you get exactly what you want to get in a short period of time without committing to long-term contracts or going through a traditional curriculum that you may not necessarily be interested in. A good example of getting to the point is Sensei Buddha’s Stick Modules. He gets right to the point and gets the average person up to speed with using kali sticks in in about less than 20 training hours – that’s it.
  18. 18. I have also had the good fortune to train a few times (more to come in the future) with Martial Blade Concepts™ Certified Instructor Paul Harris. The training is targeted and the focus is on safety first, effectiveness, and efficiency. You get what you need, you practice on your own, and you keep it moving.
  19. 19. A W A R E N E S S A N D C O M M O N S E N S E When I was in Army Basic Training back in 1992, one of the mantras we would often recite was “Stay alert! Stay alive!” You have to be aware of your surrounding at all times. That doesn’t mean that you have to look around constantly or anything like that, but you should be careful about being to totally engrossed in a phone call, texting, or listening to your MP3 player while walking down the street – and you certainly should not be texting while driving or on your mobile without a hands-free solutions (ear phone or speaker). Borrowing another thing from my Army training, we had to give S.A.L.U.T.E. reports when we came across something suspicious or when doing recon. S.A.L.U.T.E. stands for Size, Activity, Location, Unit, Time, and Equipment. When you are aware of your surroundings, you will be able to answer all six of these questions to yourself. For instance, I am walking down the street and I see a commotion in the distance. I see 7 (size) White males cursing and jumping about angrily (activity). They are on the corner of Main Street and Elm Street (location). They have red leather biker vests that read “Hudson Hellfire Riders” on the back (unit). The time is currently 6:07pm/1807 hours (time). They have motorcycles, chains, and baseball bats (equipment). I would then call this information into 911. Me being aware of my surroundings and not being distracted by mobile phone chatter, texting, or an MP3 player has helped me stay on my p’s
  20. 20. and q’s and avoid danger. Years ago when I was a green belt, I remember walking down the street on my way to class jamming to some tunes on my CD player (yeah, that was a looooong time ago). Soke Zulu’s wife, Hachidan Zosia Gorbaty, walked up on me and kicked me in my back. I didn’t see her coming. She gave me quite a tongue-lashing about walking down the street with my head up my – well, you know. That was a lesson well learned and to this day you will not find me spacing out with ear phones plugged into my ears. That could be hazardous to one’s health. There are a lot of articles floating around the Internet about being caught in a dark alley, or in a biker bar. Let’s use some common sense. Why the heck would you walk down a dark alley or be in a biker bar if you’re looking to stay out of trouble. We have a brain for a reason so we should use it. The best defense is avoiding confrontation all together.
  21. 21. C O N D I T I O N I N G Look, you don’t have to become an Olympic-level athlete, but most of us certainly have to be in decent shape to pull our “tricks” off. If you’re truly a busy person, you don’t have time to really get to the gym. I highly recommend calisthenics, dumbbells, and resistance bands. Of course, you throw in some calisthenics (preferably in-home walking) and some light yoga stretches and you’re on your way. You will be surprised how much you can get done in 15 to 30 minutes per day, three to five times per week. You’ll have awesome results! For instance, Coach Istvan Javorek developed some really effective dumbbell routines. One set of his Dumbbell Complex #1 can be done in less than 2 minutes. Yes, you read that right. 2 minutes. You get 30 full-body lifts in that time period. When you do three to five sets, you’ll only have spent 10 to 15 minutes but you will get a high volume of work done. Phooey to spending 2 hour at the gym. That kicks rocks! As Sweet Brown of YouTube fame says, “Ain’t nobody got time for that!” Here is a YouTube video giving a demo of Javorek’s Dumbbell Complex #1: http://bit.ly/1dQ8b63. Conditioning work should be done AFTER skills training. It always kills me how some schools run their students through a boot camp before they do skill work. How in the heck are you supposed to have proper form when your muscles are already shot? Also, don’t you come to a martial arts school for martial arts training? There really is no
  22. 22. need to spend so much time doing calisthenics and such. That should be done on the student’s own time. Skills work must take precedence.
  23. 23. P H Y S I C A L P R I N C I P L E S The way I was taught martial arts is to focus more on principles rather than on techniques. The best explanation I have seen on these physical principles appear in Bob Orlando’s book entitled Indonesian Fighting Fundamentals: The Brutal Arts of the Archipelago. To borrow directly from his book, here are the principles with brief explanations: Adhesion – Sticking to your opponent so you can feel what they are going to attempt they cannot necessarily feel what you’re going to do. Also, keeping your guard tight so as to not get grabbed, stabbed, or pounded. Soke Chaka Zulu introduced me to this concept and related drills and he calls it “Cleaning the Ants.” Sensei Buddha calls it the “Rub-A-Dub” the latter term made it easier for students to grasp the concept. Whiplash – This is caused when an opponent’s force is used against him. It is when you fight fire with water. For instance, when you cause someone to run into a clothesline strike, you will most certainly cause them some degree of whiplash – plus other injuries. Gyroscopic Rotation – When something is traveling along a given plane then that path of travel is redirected – even slightly, you can really throw the equilibrium of the opponent off. For instance if you are holding someone’s head, and you are turning it to an east to west axis, then rotate slightly to have it go on a north to south direction
  24. 24. of travel, you really break their balance and have control of their body. We take special care when practicing these techniques because you can cause headaches, neck trauma or in extreme situations you can cause death. This principle also plays a role in wrist locks a wrist lock takedowns. Shearing – when you have to objects that parallel but are on different planes, traveling in opposing directions (like a scissors), you get the shearing effect. For instance, an elbow smash to the face is a favorite of Muay Thai Kickboxers and Krav Maga practitioners. That elbow is made more effective when you pull the opponent toward you while hitting them with the elbow. The impact is much more severe. Seating – When you keep your center of gravity low, you are in a better position (literally) to control the action. It is so much easier to keep your balance when you get your body low. The Bumble Bee – This is borrowed directly from Soke Chaka Zulu. What this allows you to do is keep your hands moving in erratic circles so that you can break free from grabs and set up counterstrikes. It is an ingenious principle. The way Soke Zulu had us hardwire this into our system is through a simple training tool we simply called “The Rope.” When Sensei Buddha actually teaches this principle to students, he calls the drills based on this principle “The Crazy Conductor.” The drills based on this principle certainly help ramp-up your ability to defend yourself.
  25. 25. H A P P Y L A N D I N G S Before you start learning how to throw people, you must first learn how to have “happy landings” – how to break your falls properly. The ground can be a very dangerous weapon. Slip and falls break bones and may cause severe lacerations. We teach break-falling progressively by literally starting from the ground up – from sitting on the ground/floor working up to the standing position. In the future when time permits, I will load videos onto YouTube demonstrating various break-falls. Here are the break-falls we tend to focus on: Side Falls (Left and Right) Side falls protect you from being injured by hip throws, shoulder throws, trips, and sweeps. Back Fall The back fall helps you avoid injury to your tail bone, spine and head. Front Fall This break-fall helps you keep your face pretty. It is the go to fall when pushed forward. Five Point Slap-Out
  26. 26. This break-fall helps you from hurting your tail bone and your spine. This is the go-to fall if you are scoop slammed or on the receiving end of any catapult type of throw. Forward Side Rolls (Left and Right) These break-falls help you protect your head, shoulders, elbow and lower body. The momentum puts you in a position to stand up so that you can flee or fight. Back Side Rolls (Left and Right) Like the back fall, this break-fall helps you avoid injury to your tail bone, spine and back of your head. The momentum puts you in a position to stand up so that you can flee or fight. Log Rolling (called “Pencil Rolls” by Soke Zulu) This can help you “roll off” the impact when you take a side, back, or front fall. It is also a great evasive maneuver than can help you get back to the standing position so you can flee or fight.
  27. 27. F I V E F O C U S A R E A S The way I was trained is to work toward mastery of five techniques in five categories. There is no need to learn dozens of techniques because in a combat situation, you will be under stress and the adrenal dump will compromise your peripheral vision and your fine motor skills. In fight speak; you go from being a scalpel to becoming an ax. Gross motor skills are what have to be trained and your training must be against a resisting opponent. If you only work with a compliant partner (in Japanese, an uke), you will develop a false sense of security and proficiency. That is why free-fighting and random attacks are so very important. In the future when time permits, I will load videos onto YouTube demonstrating various open hand strikes. Open Hand Strikes To get back on task, let’s talk about open hand strikes. I like open hand strikes because you can hit things a lot harder without getting injured with your palm than using a clenched fist. Also, some women may have long finger nails that may make a clenched fist infeasible. You are your own person so choose what you want to use. Below are five open hand techniques that I train in regularly: Palm I like to use boxer-type punches but instead of a clenched fist, I use
  28. 28. my palm. The jab, cross, hook, uppercut, and overhand can all be done as a palm strike. Slap I’m talking about using a relaxed hand and really spinning someone’s head around. We go with a roundhouse a reverse backhands in our training sessions. Chop A chop uses the meaty portion on the blade side (pinky side) of your hand. It is very effective against soft targets like the neck. Ox Jaw This is when you hit the opponent with the back of your hand or wrist. It is very effective against torso targets and the groin. Hammer Fist This is pretty much the only clenched fist technique that I teach because the striking surface is the meaty portion of your hand (like the chop) instead of your knuckles. It also carries over well to pocket stick training because that is one of the basic strikes with a pocket stick. Feminine Fist This is an alternative to the standard clenched fist taking into account that the female trainee may have long fingernails. In this version of the fist, the four fingers are laid across the meaty portion of the palm while the storm relaxes against the index finger.
  29. 29. Kicks There are some fancy kicks out there. I suggest that you keep them basic and low. Depending on what you are wearing and literally the ground that you’re standing on, higher kicks may be impractical and put you in a danger. In the future when time permits, I will load videos onto YouTube demonstrating various kicks. Below are five kicks with an explanation on how to perform them properly. Front When doing the front kick, I recommend using the heel as the striking surface. You’ll most likely be wearing stiff shoes and this will make your kick more powerful and will protect you from ankle or toe injuries. Roundhouse There are different variations of this kick, but I focus on teaching it using the instep as the striking surface. Without a doubt, the Muay Thai version is extremely powerful, but most people literally don’t have the shins for it. Also, the more traditional Karate/Tae Kwon Do versions of this kick allow you to put a little something extra if you need it. I’m talking about Master Michael Griffin’s Kuba Kickz™
  30. 30. pictured below. Side Like the front kick, focus on using the heel of your foot. The brand of Jujutsu that I have my black belt in borrows heavily from Goju Karate and we like that quick straight up and out version they use. Inside Crescent Tae Kwon Do first introduced me to this kick. It is very quick and deceptive and you don’t need a lot of space to execute this technique. Hook The hook kick is very deceptive and powerful kick you can throw from you lead leg. It appears to be traveling on a different trajectory but is quickly whipped (i.e., hooked) back into the opposite direction. You can use your heel or the sole of your foot as the striking surface. Remember, you’ll most likely have on shoes so either way
  31. 31. you’re good money. Joint Lock Takedowns In Japanese joint-locking arts like Jujutsu or Aikido, the understanding of levers and the weaknesses in the human anatomy are paramount. Make sure to work techniques from both sides of your body. In the future when time permits, I will load videos onto YouTube demonstrating various joint lock techniques. Here are five joint locks that can be used as come-along holds, takedowns, or pins: Wrist Turn-Out With this technique, you grab the back of the opponent’s with your mirror reflection hand (e.g., you grab his right hand with your left hand) at about between the middle and ring finger. You use your other hand to gyroscopically rotate the opponent’s wrist outward – in the direction their thumb is pointing. Wrist Turn-In This is where you place the thumb of your mirror reflection hand (e.g., you grab his right hand with your left hand) between the thumb and index finger of the opponent’s hand and turn the pinky side of the opponent’s hand gyroscopically toward his body. Make sure to use your opposite hand to push down the opponent’s elbow so that he cannot escape. To me, this is the most painful of the joint locks, so be very careful when practicing on others.
  32. 32. Goose Neck You use your mirror reflection hand (e.g., you grab his right hand with your left hand) to grab the entire side of the thumb side of the opponent’s hand. Assuming you have their right hand, you will move clockwise (to your left) while holding you hand steady so that you’re standing next to them. This will put their hand in a palms up position and create a potent come-along wrist lock Compression Locks A good example of a compression lock is after “rub-a-dubbing” a hooking punch with your opponent’s right hand, you snake your right hand over to the outside of the opponent’s arm just above the elbow, clasp your hands, then squeeze. This creates pain. An Achilles lock is an example of using compression against the leg. Rapid 4 Corners Throw I am borrowing Michael Janich’s (founder of Martial Blade Concepts™) method for doing this popular Aikido throw. For illustration purposes, you use right hand on right hand to take down your opponent. You grab his wrist and stir your hand clockwise toward his head. This will cause his elbow to be trapped between the “V” of your bicep and hand. His wrist will be lock and if you keep moving forward or move briskly in any direction (thus the name 4 Corners Throw), he will hit the deck. Throws and Trips
  33. 33. There is an old saying in Judo: “Thou shalt not attack a judoka because the earth will rise up and smite thee across thy back.” In short, gravity is a son-of-gun and the ground hurts like heck. When doing any throw, remember these three things: (1) Break their balance; (2) Get position; and (3) Throw. The problem a lot of people have with throwing others is they do not do things in this order. Below are five throws that I really like. Four of them are top-scoring Judo throws and the other is one of the devastating throws from Aikido. Make sure to practice the throws from both sides of your body. Don’t be “one- sided.” In the future when time permits, I will load videos onto YouTube demonstrating various throws. Body Drop This throw is more of a trip where you cause the opponent to stumble over your extended leg by pulling him over it. It is a good throw for a small person to use against a larger person. Sweeping Hip This is my favorite throw. You bring the opponent over your hip but I sweep my leg up against their leg and they go flying over – catapult style. Front Entering Throw This throw relies heavily on the shearing and gyroscopic rotation principles. To the uninitiated it looks like a clothes line takedown but it is more about hip displacement, “rub-a-dubbing” the opponent with your other arm then pushing down forcefully.
  34. 34. Double Arm Shoulder This is the top scoring throw in competition Judo. It requires good timing and some muscle, but it is certainly a devastating throw. Major Outer Reap This is one of the first throws that people learn in Judo and Jujutsu. As is the case with all throws, disrupting your opponent’s balance is very important. A small person can throw a much larger person with this throw when they commit to breaking their balance. Extremely Close Quarters When you’re in a close quarters situation, you will not be able to throw palm strikes or kicks. For instance, if you’re grabbed into a bear hug, your options are limited. In the future when time permits, I will load videos onto YouTube demonstrating various extremely close quarter techniques. Below are five techniques along with training notes that you should practice for extremely close combat situations: Head Butt Use your legs and full body weight when head-butting. Don’t whip your neck. Your neck should be flexed, bite down, and use the hairline area of your forehead against soft areas of your opponent’s face. Target the nose in particular. This can be a devastating technique when executed properly. Little “love taps” with the side of your head against soft areas like the nose work well too.
  35. 35. Elbows Ouch! Elbows really hurt and bust someone up. They are great follow- throughs after palm strikes or other open hand techniques. Use the flat part of your elbow (forearm side) toward the tip for maximum effect. Knees They are very stealthy and painful. You can use the same trajectory you use for kicks for knee strikes. Joint Pushes and Pulls Soke Bob Martin of Unified Force Martial Arts calls this “nudging.” What you do is pull or push on joints to disrupt balance. For instance, if you pull against someone’s knee while they are standing, their balance will be disrupted. Cavity Presses When you push your finger or thumb into areas they don’t belong, pain happens. Eye gouges, fish hooking, and pressure point attacks (e.g., applying pressure just beneath the ear about where the lower jaw is or knuckling the temple) fall under this category.
  36. 36. P A R T N E R D R I L L S In the BuddhaStrike Combatives Method, we don’t spend time doing kata (prearranged forms) as we don’t think it gets us toward our goal of being proficient and self-protection. We may create our own weapons kata from time to time for demonstration purposes (like this kata I did using a South African Sjambok  http://bit.ly/12I6Byj), but we feel that partner drills and solo drills are the way to go. Silat & Kali Hand Drills A lot of our hand and foot drills are inspired by Indonesian and Filipino martial arts (Silat and Kali). To get a better idea, check out the Silat & Kali hand drills as demonstrated by Michael Janich: http://youtu.be/e7pjy62MTFM Silat & Kali Foot Drills We are supposed to be able to fight with our hands and feet but not many people fight with their hands and feet. Bob Orlando has some cool ideas on how to incorporate leg maneuvers to bolster your ability to protect yourself. Check out his video by clicking on the following link  http://youtu.be/jWKKLw41Um8 Locksmithing You can create flow with your striking by using various Kali empty- hand or stick drills, but you have to have a plan for doing the same
  37. 37. things with joint locking. We call this “Locksmithing.” For instance, we practice moving from one lock to another on an opponent. This helps create more sensitivity and helps you realize that there is always another option so that you don’t spend a lot of time trying to snap on one particular lock. For instance, we move from wrist turn-out, to wrist turn-out, to an arm bar, to a goose neck come-along, to a 4 directions throw, to a rear naked choke, to a guillotine choke (now moving to the opposite side of the body) to wrist turn-out, to wrist turn-out, to an arm bar, to a goose neck come-along, to a 4 directions throw, to a rear naked choke, to a guillotine choke. It is very important to work toward being able to do locks on either side of your body. Wrestler’s Waltz This segment of our training is all about defense. We focus on how to avoid being thrown, taken down, and joint lock escapes and reversals. Random Attacks You never know what you’re going to get behind door number 1, 2, or 3 so you have to be prepared for it. No one in the street is going to tell you what’s coming your way, so you have to be prepared. Random attacks helps you become more battle-ready. The United Nations of Jujutsu has a competitive category called random attacks at their meets. Flash Mobbing
  38. 38. Soke Zulu says it best, “Creeps are like grapes because they come in bunches.” Therefore, you have to do some drills where a mob of people attack you. That is the best and only way that you can be prepared from getting “jumped.” You will get hit, but this training will help you minimize the lumps you may take otherwise.
  39. 39. S O L O D R I L L S Shadow fighting Take a page from boxers and shadowbox. Rather, shadow fight. This way you can practice developing flow with your strikes, kicks, and defense. You’ll become accustomed to moving around and how to launch your techniques from awkward positions. Rub-A-Dub Like I mentioned earlier, the Rub-A-Dub is great for help develop the flinch response so you can better defend yourself. It is like bathing yourself with a shower gel. The principle of adhesion is drilled here. Check out this demo and brief explanation of the Rub-A-Dub by Sensei Buddha  http://youtu.be/ZOw-gaHmCbY Rope The rope is a very simple and effective training tool to help you keep your hands “alive” and moving together. You don’t want to have a “dead” arm that just lays lifeless by your side. The rope also help your hands to keep rolling so that you can be like a “Crazy Conductor” and break free from grabs. Sensei Buddha does a great demonstration on using the rope. Click on the following link to watch the video  http://youtu.be/NHNfpgBBRyA Rattan Ring
  40. 40. While the rope is flexible, the rattan ring is not. Therefore you have to learn how to work around resistance. I’m okay with the rattan ring, but I want you to see the best example possible, so here is my instructor, Sensei Buddha doing a demonstration on using the rattan ring  http://youtu.be/a4NFHaORJBc By the way, the rattan ring can also be used as a weapon. Defensive Stepping Developing your footwork must be part of your self-protection regimen. You don’t necessarily have to be like Ali and be able to float like a butterfly, but things like “saw stepping,” “triangle stepping,” and Silat leg maneuvers are very important. Even practicing stepping on someone’s foot to trap them for a takedown is something that you have to practice so when you really have to do it under stress you’ll be able to pull it off.
  41. 41. I M P A C T T R A I N I N G If you’re not hitting something, you are not really training. The impact of hitting something will help you become accustomed to the shock – feedback. For instance, if you train in Kali, you have to hit a heavy bag from time to time or when you do hit something, you’ll drop your stick(s). Remember, it is not always what you train in, but how you train. Check out what Guro Dan Medina is doing here:  http://youtu.be/kICCm3X7fo8
  42. 42. L E S S – T H A N – L E T H A L , L E G A L – T O – C A R R Y W E A P O N R Y The below YouTube videos highlight the use of my favorite weapons:  Griffin Grip™ (by Master Michael Griffin and by Sensei Buddha)  http://youtu.be/JHaE546MQZU, http://youtu.be/9yVu9J_KTzE  Sharpshooter Keychain™ (by Sempai Turner)  http://youtu.be/qDiF8-8lJek  Tactical Pens (by Master Michael Griffin)  http://youtu.be/swNtQ7HFLWk  Pocket Sticks (by Sensei Buddha)  http://youtu.be/ZGkY703djCc
  43. 43. R E S O U R C E S BuddhaStrike YouTube Channel www.youtube.com/buddhastrike Martial Blade Concepts™ www.martialbladeconcepts.com Griffin Martial Training www.griffinmartialtraining.com Sharpshooter Keychains www.sharpshooterkeychain.com The United Nations of Jiu Jitsu www.unjj.org Bob Orlando’s Je Du-Too School of Martial Arts www.orlandokuntao.com Miyama Ryu™ Combat Jujutsu Worldwide www.miyamaryu.org/index.html Marc “Animal” MacYoung www.nononsenseselfdefense.com Geoff Thompson www.geoffthompson.com Loren W. Christensen www.lorenchristensen.com Leslie Sansone www.lesliesansonevideos.com Scrapper’s Bodyweight Conditioning www.trainforstrength.com Istvan Javorek www.istvanjavorek.com Lifeline USA Resistance Bands www.lifelineusa.com

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