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THE JWL DIFFERENCE
JESUIT WORLDWIDE LEARNING
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸ At the heart of JWL’s mission are these
words:
“Learning together to transform the world”
Let...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
Our model
▸  Student cohorts learn together in an onsite learning
center with dedicated staff h...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  Our learning centers provide:
▸  Computer access
▸  Internet access
▸  Onsite general tutors...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  There is a lot going on behind the scenes with the
Academic team of JWL, too.
▸  Director of...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
Learning Centers
▸  Students come from many different locations:
▸  Amman, Jordan (urban refuge...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  While students come from many different
locations, they are mixed together in the
online cla...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸ Back to the heart of our mission statement:
“Learning together to transform the world”
Let’s ...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸ Transformation begins with an expertly
written and designed curriculum that is
sensitive to t...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸ Once approved, our curriculum is designed
into an online framework by our course
designers
▸ ...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
We do more than give lip service to the word
“transform.”
▸  We use IGNATIAN PEDAGOGY to:
▸  Ke...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
JWL Perspective
We use a variety of perspectives, and yet we do not
leave out the western persp...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  Once we open the doors for context, we then:
▸  Give students EXPERIENCES that can help them...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
Note!
▸  You might be wondering how Northern Ireland or
even Jazz relates to the lives of refug...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  After experiences, students are then:
▸  Provided an opportunity for REFLECTION so that they...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  Reflection then leads one into making changes
in the world around them. In the JWL curriculum...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
What happens…
▸  The action element is so transforming that we
often see students creating prog...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  Constant improvement is a good educational practice.
We accomplish this through EVALUATION
▸...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  The evaluation results we receive then enter a
feedback loop that involves our academic
team...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  Some examples of feedback and changes include:
▸  Using unified rubrics so faculty members fe...
THE JWL DIFFERENCE
Context
Experience
ReflectionAction
Evaluation
Thus, our model looks like this:
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  Is transformation just a personal event?
▸  Transformation is personal – the student combine...
TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION
▸  Is transformation just a personal event?
▸  No; transformation is also cultural, societal, a...
JUST SOME BACKGROUND….JWL HAS:
325 active students,
from 9sites,
with43% women, and 57%men.
DIPLOMA FACULTY IN 2016:
86 individual	
  faculty	
  members	
  taught	
  135	
  
sec4ons	
  and	
  are	
  from	
  24colle...
MAINTAINING THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION RECEIVED
▸  So what affects the quality of the education
received?
▸  The student’s b...
JWL TEACHING PRACTICES
▸ Online teaching effectiveness uses social, teaching,
and cognitive presence -
  SOCIAL is the abi...
JWL TEACHING PRACTICES
▸  SOCIAL PRESENCE
▸  Welcome announcement with your photo, signed by you,
and includes your email
...
JWL TEACHING PRACTICES
▸  TEACHING PRESENCE is how the instructor shares their
subject matter knowledge
▸  While the cours...
JWL TEACHING PRACTICES
▸  COGNITIVE PRESENCE is how the instructor helps
students construct meaning and knowledge of the c...
JWL TEACHING PRACTICES
▸ Provide timely feedback
▸ Students crave your feedback
▸ They do not have the same reliable acces...
JWL TEACHING PRACTICES
▸ Communicate high expectations
▸ Despite the challenges of our JWL students, we
still need to have...
REFERENCES
Gorsky, P., & Blau, I. (2009). Online teaching effectiveness: A
tale of two instructors. International Review o...
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The JWL difference -- Ignatian Pedagogy and our Academic Processes

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The JWL difference -- Ignatian Pedagogy and our Academic Processes

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The JWL difference -- Ignatian Pedagogy and our Academic Processes

  1. 1. THE JWL DIFFERENCE JESUIT WORLDWIDE LEARNING
  2. 2. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸ At the heart of JWL’s mission are these words: “Learning together to transform the world” Let’s look at the “learning together” part first.
  3. 3. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION Our model ▸  Student cohorts learn together in an onsite learning center with dedicated staff hired by onsite partners to guide and mentor them. ▸  We work with partners on the ground because they are already successful at working in the environments where we operate ▸  They are called our ‘implementing partners’ ▸  Alind (Kurdistan) ▸  ReConnect (Brooklyn) ▸  St. Aloysius Gonzaga school (Taunggyi) ▸  Jesuit Refugee Service (everywhere else)
  4. 4. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  Our learning centers provide: ▸  Computer access ▸  Internet access ▸  Onsite general tutors ▸  Opportunities for group reflection and discussion ▸  Academic advising and guidance
  5. 5. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  There is a lot going on behind the scenes with the Academic team of JWL, too. ▸  Director of Academic Operations (DAO) – Dr. Tara Ross – oversees the diploma program for JWL ▸  Head of Faculty – Dr. Marie Friedemann – hires faculty and manages faculty ▸  Student Records Officer – Tracy Jenkins – manages student grades, grade changes, schedules, and enrollment statuses ▸  Academic System Support – Alejandro Brillembourg – works with the DAO to administer the diploma program
  6. 6. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION Learning Centers ▸  Students come from many different locations: ▸  Amman, Jordan (urban refugees – not in a camp) ▸  Bamyan, Afghanistan ▸  Brooklyn, New York ▸  Domiz, Iraq (Kurdistan) (refugee camp) ▸  Dzaleka, Malawi (refugee camp) ▸  Erbil, Iraq (Kurdistan) ▸  Herat, Afghanistan ▸  Kakuma, Kenya (refugee camp) ▸  Taunggyi, Myanmar
  7. 7. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  While students come from many different locations, they are mixed together in the online classroom ▸  Thus, students who start in one of our January or August cohorts may see each other every day in their learning center, but they meet other students from our other locations in their online classes
  8. 8. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸ Back to the heart of our mission statement: “Learning together to transform the world” Let’s look at the “transformation” part next.
  9. 9. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸ Transformation begins with an expertly written and designed curriculum that is sensitive to the culture and context of our diverse student population ▸ Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) write our curriculum, which then goes through two rounds of review – one internal and one external
  10. 10. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸ Once approved, our curriculum is designed into an online framework by our course designers ▸ Courses are 8 weeks long, and are housed on the Blackboard Learning Management System ▸ Regis University, which approves all course content, awards credits for courses
  11. 11. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION We do more than give lip service to the word “transform.” ▸  We use IGNATIAN PEDAGOGY to: ▸  Keep the curriculum sensitive to a student’s CONTEXT, regardless if they are ▸  in a refugee camp in Africa, ▸  at a living-on-site location in Bamyan, Afghanistan, ▸  an inner city in Brooklyn, ▸  or a remote and rural part of Myanmar.
  12. 12. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION JWL Perspective We use a variety of perspectives, and yet we do not leave out the western perspective. English is the language of our program. Ultimately, we let the student bring in their own context. We call this “leaving the doors and windows open.”
  13. 13. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  Once we open the doors for context, we then: ▸  Give students EXPERIENCES that can help them learn a topic in a meaningful way. This might take the form of: ▸  Providing science kits to our students in the physical science class so that they can conduct experiments (many for the first time) ▸  Watching videos of Northern Ireland ex- combatants talk about their peace building actions today ▸  Listening to jazz music and learning how to use art to tell a story in order to give it impact
  14. 14. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION Note! ▸  You might be wondering how Northern Ireland or even Jazz relates to the lives of refugees. First, don’t put your own blinders on…students have tremendous capacity to learn about new contexts regardless of their own. ▸  Second, sometimes we deliberately take students far away from their existing context and let them learn about another context. Once they have learned the information without the benefit of their own environmental cues and/or blinders, they may be more objective. Then they can apply what they’ve learned to their own context and life story.
  15. 15. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  After experiences, students are then: ▸  Provided an opportunity for REFLECTION so that they can connect the head to the heart, and let what they’ve learned affect what they understand, believe, and feel. ▸  Reflections are journals that students write each week. They are graded pass/fail, and while we want you to read them, and ensure that the student is doing them, we don’t want you to grade them for what they write (unless it’s unrelated to the assignment.)
  16. 16. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  Reflection then leads one into making changes in the world around them. In the JWL curriculum, we do this through Action. ▸  With ACTION, students have an activity, an assignment, or project that not only helps them apply what they have learned, but also helps them consider how they can transform the world around them.
  17. 17. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION What happens… ▸  The action element is so transforming that we often see students creating programs outside of their studies that will benefit their community. Once students learn how to think like this, they develop a tremendous sense of personal agency.
  18. 18. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  Constant improvement is a good educational practice. We accomplish this through EVALUATION ▸  Students are evaluated in what they have learned formatively (asynchronous discussions), and summatively (assignments, journals, projects, and tests). ▸  Students evaluate the curriculum and their faculty member through an end-of-course evaluation. ▸  Faculty evaluate the curriculum and the course design through a faculty end-of-course evaluation ▸  The academic team at JWL evaluates the outcomes to determine next steps.
  19. 19. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  The evaluation results we receive then enter a feedback loop that involves our academic team and our course designers. ▸  We use the results and outcomes to improve the curriculum, the design, and the program as a whole.
  20. 20. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  Some examples of feedback and changes include: ▸  Using unified rubrics so faculty members feel less burdened by grading ▸  Modifying some course content to require less busy work and richer, more meaningful (but fewer) assignments. ▸  Suggesting that our learning centers hire an alumni to tutor current students in Algebra on-site
  21. 21. THE JWL DIFFERENCE Context Experience ReflectionAction Evaluation Thus, our model looks like this:
  22. 22. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  Is transformation just a personal event? ▸  Transformation is personal – the student combines their prior life experiences with their newly acquired knowledge and, based on their current context, begins to change how they approach problem solving. ▸  More personal agency ▸  Begin to see options ▸  Recognize opportunities ▸  Crave “what’s next” – want to go beyond the JWL program
  23. 23. TRANSFORMATIONAL EDUCATION ▸  Is transformation just a personal event? ▸  No; transformation is also cultural, societal, and global. ▸  We don’t aim to change culture; it enriches the lives of our students. ▸  We aim to have students transform their societies and their world within their cultural context.
  24. 24. JUST SOME BACKGROUND….JWL HAS: 325 active students, from 9sites, with43% women, and 57%men.
  25. 25. DIPLOMA FACULTY IN 2016: 86 individual  faculty  members  taught  135   sec4ons  and  are  from  24colleges  and  universi4es,   2 high  schools,  and  4  non-­‐profit  organiza4ons
  26. 26. MAINTAINING THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION RECEIVED ▸  So what affects the quality of the education received? ▸  The student’s background and abilities ▸  The curriculum ▸  The availability of on-site tutors ▸  The structure of program ▸  and teaching practices (Su-Ann & Van Der Stouwe, 2008). Let’s look at teaching practices!
  27. 27. JWL TEACHING PRACTICES ▸ Online teaching effectiveness uses social, teaching, and cognitive presence -   SOCIAL is the ability to project oneself and establish rapport,   TEACHING PRESENCE is how the instructor shares their subject matter knowledge,   COGNITIVE PRESENCE is how they help students construct meaning and knowledge of the content   (Gorsky & Blau, 2009)
  28. 28. JWL TEACHING PRACTICES ▸  SOCIAL PRESENCE ▸  Welcome announcement with your photo, signed by you, and includes your email ▸  Weekly announcements that guide the students for what is coming up in the week ahead ▸  If your course carries an introduction discussion, reply to each student individually to welcome them ▸  Be active in the weekly discussions at least 3 times per week, replying to students’ posts and encouraging students to check out points made by other students as well ▸  Reply promptly to student emails
  29. 29. JWL TEACHING PRACTICES ▸  TEACHING PRESENCE is how the instructor shares their subject matter knowledge ▸  While the course, syllabus, rubrics, and assignments have already been created for you, we ask that you contribute your subject knowledge in the online discussions ▸  You can also share your expertise in feedback to student assignments ▸  Finally, you can share subject content using the announcement feature ▸  While faculty have used Skype to communicate with students, we cannot require it because of bandwidth and time zone differences.
  30. 30. JWL TEACHING PRACTICES ▸  COGNITIVE PRESENCE is how the instructor helps students construct meaning and knowledge of the content ▸  This combines the design of the course with your expertise ▸  Much of this is accomplished through our curriculum and course design, but is enhanced through your discussion posts with students ▸  Bring in your professional experiences and insight ▸  Share new perspectives and understandings ▸  Motivate and encourage student involvement
  31. 31. JWL TEACHING PRACTICES ▸ Provide timely feedback ▸ Students crave your feedback ▸ They do not have the same reliable access to their courses, so getting them feedback that allows them to maximize the online time they do have is very helpful ▸ Please have each week’s grades completed one week from when it ends.
  32. 32. JWL TEACHING PRACTICES ▸ Communicate high expectations ▸ Despite the challenges of our JWL students, we still need to have high expectations ▸ Flexibility is warranted due to internet outages, power outages, sickness in the camps, but we also want to avoid extending every deadline, or allowing non-emergency extensions ▸ Policies regarding plagiarism, final grades, course extensions, and more are found in the Faculty Quick Guide
  33. 33. REFERENCES Gorsky, P., & Blau, I. (2009). Online teaching effectiveness: A tale of two instructors. International Review of Research in Open & Distance Learning, 10(3), 1-27. Su-Ann, O., & Van Der Stouwe, M. (2008). Education, diversity, and inclusion in Burmese refugee camps in Thailand. Comparative Education Review, 52(4), 589-617.

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