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Business

  1. 1. Course information - Internal BUSS5059 (2009) Research Methods in Business and Management G Course Coordinator: Dr Brianne Hastie
  2. 2. CONTENTS Introduction Course overview Learning resources Assessment Feedback form Course calendar (see inside back cover) This Course information needs to be read in conjunction with Extra course information available at: http://www.unisa.edu.au/ltu/about/service-framework/course-information/extra.asp . It can also be accessed through myUniSA at: http://www.unisa.edu.au/myUniSA/ . INTRODUCTION WELCOME Your pursuit of higher studies in academic research places you in a very select group. Very  few university students, and even fewer in Business disciplines, complete higher research  degrees. Despite its select nature, however, the research community is always welcoming of  new members, because of the additional insights they bring and the new ways they  contribute to knowledge.  You will find that this course is different from earlier courses you have taken. While you  were previously required to gain knowledge about a particular topic, this course will help  you to understand how such knowledge is developed; and how you can add to knowledge  within your discipline. The knowledge and skills acquired here will prepare you for a lifetime  of further learning through understanding of research conducted by others and by engaging  in further research yourself.   People become good, and passionate, researchers through three processes: reading, or  reading about, research; talking to others about research (their own or other people’s); and  doing research. Hopefully, by the end of this course you will be ready to do research, having  prepared a research proposal as the major piece of assessment. The course also provides  opportunities for people to read about and to talk to others about research. Diverse  research methodologies and methods exist, as do diverse opinions about them. It is  expected that students will have the opportunity to experience this diversity within this  course.  1
  3. 3. Course Coordinator Dr Brianne Hastie  Location: DP 2‐37  Email: Brianne.Hastie@unisa.edu.au  Telephone: (08) 83020289  Course Coordinator homepage: www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/staff/homepage.asp?Name=Brianne.Hastie Information regarding this course is available through myUniSA: http://www.unisa.edu.au/myUniSA/ SCHOOL CONTACT DETAILS Division of Business   University of South Australia  Level 2, David Pank Building  North Tce.  Adelaide, SA, 5000  Telephone: (08) 83020289 Fax: (08) 83020904  Email: Brianne.Hastie@unisa.edu.au 2
  4. 4. COURSE OVERVIEW COURSE STATEMENT This course is designed to develop students’ knowledge and application of scholarly research  methods and associated data analysis that is relevant to research in business, management, and the  wider social sciences. LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND GRADUATE QUALITIES On completion of this course, students should be able to:  Knowledge and Understanding  • Identify alternative methodological approaches to empirical research in the social sciences   • Identify alternative methods of research design and their various elements   • Evaluate alternative ways of collecting data   • Demonstrate skills in analysing quantitative and qualitative data   Problem Solving and Life‐long Learning   • Demonstrate skills in preparing a research proposal  Including: reviewing literature; identifying a contribution; and selecting and  o justifying a research methodology, method of data collection, and method of data  analysis  Ethical action and social responsibility  • Explain the ethical and social responsibilities of researchers in conducting and disseminating  research  Communication  • Demonstrate skills in communicating, both orally and in writing  PREREQUISITE(S)/ ASSUMED KNOWLEDGE None TEACHING AND LEARNING ARRANGEMENTS BUSS5059 is taught in Study Period 2 through internal mode only.   Each week there is a:  • Three (3) hour seminar. The seminar will involve a mix of activities, including lectures, small  group work on applied issues, and whole class discussion.  3
  5. 5. There are three pieces of assessment in this course. These are: a research proposal outline; research  proposal; and an exam.   Students are expected to actively participate in small group and class discussions in an informed  way. Readings from the text and other materials assigned for each week are expected to be  completed to facilitate informed, active participation.   Registration in selected Library workshops related to research strategies is also expected. Students  will be notified of these during the study period.  UNIT VALUE OF COURSE 4.5 units  SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS   4
  6. 6. LEARNING RESOURCES TEXT(S) You will need continual access to the following text(s) in order to complete this course. The library may hold only one copy of the nominated text books and therefore you will need to acquire the book(s). Neuman, W.L. (2006). Social Research Methods: Qualitative and quantitative approaches (6th ed.).  Boston, MA: Pearson Education.  MATERIALS TO BE ACCESSED ONLINE Course homepage and myUniSA www.unisa.edu.au/myUniSA http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/courses/course.asp?Course=011742 (BUSS5059) Extra course information This booklet provides important information relevant to the study of all your courses. This can be accessed at: http://www.unisa.edu.au/ltu/about/service-framework/course-information/extra.asp , from the course homepage and myUniSA. OTHER RESOURCES Students will be provided with various additional readings, including journal articles as  well as other documents, for use in in‐class small group activities.   Additional general resources include:  Research Methods:  Babbie, E. (2007). The Practice of Social Research (11th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.  Denzin, N.K. & Lincoln, Y.S. (Eds.) (2008). Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks,  CA: Sage.  Sapsford, R. & Jupp, V. (Eds.) (2006). Data Collection and Analysis (2nd ed.). London: Sage.  Quantitative data analysis:   Coakes, S.J., Steed, L.G., & Price, J. (2008). SPSS Version 15 for Windows: Analysis without Anguish.  Milton, Queensland: John Wiley & Sons.    Field, A. (2005). Discovering Statistics Using SPSS: (and sex, drugs, and rock and roll) (2nd ed.).  London: Sage.     Qualitative data analysis:    Silverman, D. (2004). Doing Qualitative Research: A practical handbook (2nd ed.). Oxford: Oxford  University Press.  5
  7. 7. ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT SUMMARY Maximum Graduate Quality/Qualities Form of assessment Weighting Due date Length being assessed 12th April  1; 3; 5; & 6  Outline of research  1500 words  15%  proposal  (Week 6)  7th June  1; 3; 5; & 6  Research proposal  3500 words  50%  (Week  12)  1; 2; 3; 5; & 6  Exam  Examination  2 hours  35%  period  ASSESSMENT DETAILS Details of assessment submission and return are listed under each assessment task. Assessment pieces will be returned to you within two to three weeks of submission. All assignments must use the Assignment cover sheet (available from your Course homepage and in myUniSA)—whether submitted electronically or in hard copy. Please contact the Course Coordinator as soon as practicable to organise variations to  assessment pieces or due dates.  Resubmissions, remarking and extensions may all be available subject to negotiation with the Course  Coordinator. Supplementary assessments are not available for this course.   Please note that assignments submitted after the due date, without an authorised extension, will  receive a 5% late penalty per day.  After two weeks without an extension the assignment will not be  accepted.  ASSESSMENTS Assessment 1— Outline of Research Proposal Marks:    15%  Due:     Sunday, 12th April, 11:45pm (end of Week 6)  Max Length:  1500 words  This task relates to the following graduate qualities:  • Body of knowledge – by demonstrating knowledge of relevant theory and research within  students’ disciplines  6
  8. 8. • Problem solving – by developing a strategy to investigate their chosen topic  • Ethical action and social responsibility – by demonstrating an awareness of potential ethical  issues in their research and by explaining how their research will have practical impacts   • Effective written communication – by presenting their research proposal in a clear and  concise manner  The purpose of this assignment is to help you develop a plan for a research project. The research  proposal will be for an issue or problem of relevance to your discipline and it will be an empirical  research project.   With the research proposal outline, you have the opportunity to receive formative feedback on your  research proposal, so that you can improve it before submitting the full proposal (second  assignment).   Hopefully, this project will be part of your program of study, in which case you should discuss the  details with your supervisor. However, you do not have to implement the research proposal exactly  as is, and even if you are not planning to undertake a research project, developing a proposal should  still be a useful exercise for you.  Structure  While weightings are indicative of relative importance of sections within the proposal, final grade is  derived from holistic evaluation of assignment.  The relevance of particular sections may vary, depending on the specific research design and type  of data used. This will be taken into account when marking each proposal.    The structure of the Assignments 1 and 2 (outline and full proposal) differ because of the variation in  material covered in the course prior to the submission date. The outline is designed to get students  thinking about the major issues early on, particularly around how their research will make a  contribution, whereas the full proposal should be close to implementation stage.   1. Introduction (10%)  • Research problem statement – what is the issue or problem addressed by your study  and why is it important?  • Aim of research – how will your research contribute to knowledge by addressing the  issue/problem?  2. Critical review of literature (20%)  • Outlines major previous findings and relevant theories  • Not just a summary but a critical review – focus on identifying problems and gaps in  the literature as well as the past research on the topic of interest  3. Methodology (10%)  • What methodology or research approach will you use?  • Justify approach, considering its strengths and limitations  4. Theoretical/conceptual model and research propositions/hypotheses (15%)   • Which theories and/or concepts will you use?  7
  9. 9. • What are the key constructs? Define these.  5. Contribution to knowledge (10%)  • Originality and significance of research   6. Research design (10%)  • Participants: who/what will sample be?  • Measures: how will the constructs be measured?  • Procedure: how will data be collected?  7. Expected implications (10%)  • Given likely findings:   Implications for theory?  o Implications for knowledge in your discipline?  o Implications for practice or the ‘real world’?  o 8. Expected limitations (5%)  • How might your research design limit the generalisability of your results?  • Consider possible issues with sample, measures and procedure   9. Reference List (5%)  • Up‐to‐date and relevant?  • Presented in appropriate format?  10. Communication and presentation (5%)  • Well‐written and clearly argued  • Decisions are justified throughout    Formatting  The proposal should be typed, double‐spaced and equivalent of 12‐point Times New Roman font in  size. This is so that written feedback can be provided directly onto the assignment.  Referencing   Referencing style must be consistent throughout the proposal. Students should use the referencing  style most prevalent in their academic discipline (e.g., APA, Harvard, Chicago). To identify the most  prevalent referencing style, check the “instructions to authors” (submission guidelines) in the top  journals in your discipline or sub‐discipline.  Submission and Return of Assignments  All assignments should be submitted via AssignIT. Assignment cover sheets must be included within  the same document as the assignment (not as separate documents).  8
  10. 10. Assignments should be returned to students within two weeks of submission in hard copy. Students  can collect their assignments directly from the Course Coordinator during subsequent classes or  from her office.  Feedback on this assignment will be provided on the Feedback form, a copy of which is included at  the back of this booklet.  Assessment 2— Research Proposal Marks:    50%  Sunday, 7th June, 11:45pm (end of Week 12)  Due:     Max Length:  3500 words  This task relates to the following graduate qualities:  • Body of knowledge – by demonstrating knowledge of relevant theory and research within  students’ disciplines  • Problem solving – by developing a strategy to investigate their chosen topic  • Ethical action and social responsibility – by demonstrating an awareness of potential ethical  issues in their research and by explaining how their research will have practical impacts   • Effective written communication – by presenting their research proposal in a clear and  concise manner    The purpose of this assignment is to help you develop a plan for a research project. The research  proposal will be for an issue or problem of relevance to your discipline and it will be an empirical  research project.   Before completing the full research proposal, you will have had the opportunity to receive formative  feedback on your research proposal outline from the lecturer and your classmates.   Hopefully, this project will be part of your program of study, in which case you should discuss the  details with your supervisor. However, you do not have to implement the research proposal exactly  as is, and even if you are not planning to undertake a research project, developing a proposal should  still be a useful exercise for you.  Structure  While weightings are indicative of relative importance of sections within the proposal, final grade is  derived from holistic evaluation of assignment.  The relevance of particular sections may vary, depending on the specific research design and type  of data used. This will be taken into account when marking each proposal.    The structure of the Assignments 1 and 2 (outline and full proposal) differ because of the variation in  material covered in the course prior to the submission date. The outline is designed to get students  thinking about the major issues early on, whereas the full proposal should be close to  implementation stage.   9
  11. 11. 1. Introduction (10%)  • Research problem statement – what is the issue or problem addressed by your study  and why is it important?  • Aim of research – how will your research contribute to knowledge by addressing the  issue/problem?  2. Critical review of literature (20%)  • Outlines major previous findings and relevant theories  • Not just a summary but a critical review – focus on identifying problems and gaps in  the literature as well as the past research on the topic of interest  • Originality and contribution – what will your research do that hasn’t been done  before?  3. Theoretical/conceptual model and research propositions/hypotheses (15%)   • Which theories and/or concepts will you use?  • What are the key constructs?  • What do you expect to find, based on the proposed model?  4. Research design (15%)  • Participants: who/what will sample be?  • Measures: how will the constructs be measured?  • Procedure: how will data be collected?  5. Data analysis (10%)  • Suitable for answering the research question?  • Appropriate given research design, particularly the measurement of data?  • How will results be presented?  6. Expected implications (10%)  • Given likely findings:   Implications for theory?  o Implications for knowledge in your discipline?  o Implications for practice or the ‘real world’?  o 7. Expected limitations (5%)  • How might your research design limit the generalisability of your results?  • Consider possible issues with sample, measures and procedure   8. Potential ethical and social issues (5%)  • Potential ethical issues during research?  10
  12. 12. • Potential ethical or social issues arising from research results?  9. Proposed timeline (2.5%)  • When will you start and end each phase of research?  • Is this reasonable?  10. Reference List (2.5%)  • High quality, up‐to‐date and relevant?  • Presented in appropriate format?  11. Communication and presentation (5%)  • Well‐written and clearly argued  • Decisions are justified throughout    Formatting  The proposal should be typed, double‐spaced and equivalent of 12‐point Times New Roman font in  size. This is so that written feedback can be provided directly onto the assignment.  Referencing   Referencing style must be consistent throughout the proposal. Students should use the referencing  style most prevalent in their academic discipline (e.g., APA, Harvard, Chicago). To identify the most  prevalent referencing style, check the “instructions to authors” (submission guidelines) in the top  journals in your discipline or sub‐discipline.  Submission and Return of Assignments  All assignments should be submitted via AssignIT. Assignment cover sheets must be included within  the same document as the assignment (not as separate documents).  Assignments should be returned to students within two weeks of submission in hard copy. Students  can collect their assignments directly from the Course Coordinator during subsequent classes or  from her office.  Feedback on this assignment will be provided on the Feedback form, a copy of which is included at  the back of this booklet.  Assessment 3 - Examination Marks:    35%  Due:     Exam period  Max Length:  2 hours  This task relates to the following graduate qualities:  • Body of knowledge – by demonstrating knowledge of research process  11
  13. 13. • Lifelong learning – by demonstrating knowledge of research process, which can be used for  creating knowledge throughout the lifetime  • Problem solving – by producing answers to questions  • Ethical action and social responsibility – by demonstrating an awareness of potential ethical  issues in the research   • Effective written communication – by communicating ideas through written essay responses    The exam will assess material from all weeks of the course.  The duration of the exam will be two (2) hours, plus 10 minutes reading time and an extra 20  minutes for NESB students.  It will contain both multiple choice and essay questions.   Multiple choice items will be designed primarily to assess knowledge of specific concepts in research  methodology, and research methods. Essay questions will be designed to assess in depth  understanding of the research process – including methodology and methods.   Examination will reflect material covered in the seminars and assigned reading.  IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT ALL ASSESSMENT All students must adhere to the University of South Australia’s policies about assessment. Key information can be found in the Assessment section of Extra course information at: http://www.unisa.edu.au/ltu/about/service-framework/course-information/extra.asp Students with disabilities Students with disabilities may be entitled to a variation or modification to standard assessment arrangements. Policy for students with disabilities is available at: http://www.unisa.edu.au/ltu/about/teams/disability.asp VARIATIONS TO ASSESSMENT TASKS Students may request a variance to assessment methods, tasks and timelines based on medical, compassionate or religious observance grounds, or community services. Such variations must be requested within the first two weeks of the course (or equivalent for accelerated or intensive teaching). Alternative arrangements due to unexpected circumstances should be discussed with the Course Coordinator as required. Resubmissions, remarking and extensions may all be available subject to negotiation with the Course  Coordinator. Supplementary assessments are not available for this course.   Please note that assignments submitted after the due date, without an authorised extension, will  receive a 5% late penalty per day.  After two weeks without an extension the assignment will not be  accepted.  12
  14. 14. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY The university aims to foster and preserve the scholarly values of inquiry, experimentation, critical appraisal and integrity, and to foster these values in its students. Academic Integrity is a term used at university to describe honest behaviour as it relates to all academic work (for example papers written by staff, student assignments, conduct in exams, etc) and is the foundation of university life. One of the main principles is respecting other people’s ideas and not claiming them as your own. Anyone found to have used another person’s ideas without proper acknowledgement is guilty of Academic Misconduct and the University consider this to be a serious matter. The University of South Australia wants its students to display academic integrity so that its degrees are earned honestly and are trusted and valued by its students and their employers. To ensure this happens and that students adhere to high standards of academic integrity and honesty at all times, the University has policies and procedures in place to promote academic integrity and manage academic misconduct for all students. More information about Academic Integrity and what constitutes academic misconduct can be found in Section 9 of the Assessment policies and procedures manual at: http://www.unisa.edu.au/policies/manual/ or on the Learning & Teaching Unit website at: http://www.unisa.edu.au/ltu/student/studying/integrity.asp SUBMISSION AND RETURN OF ASSESSMENT PIECES See above under Assessment details. Refer also to Extra course information at: http://www.unisa.edu.au/ltu/about/service- framework/course-information/extra.asp Note: information on submission and return of assessment pieces in Extra course information is very important. Please read it before submitting assessments. EVALUATION OF THE COURSE Evaluation of both the course itself (CEI – Course Evaluation Instrument) and teaching (SET – Student  Evaluation of Teaching) will be conducted at the end of Study Period 2.   Students will receive details for accessing the evaluation via email.  13
  15. 15. FEEDBACK FORM Assessment feedback BUSS5059 Research Methods in Business and Management G Assessment 1 – Research Proposal Outline. Due 12th April, 2009. Worth 15%. Maximum of 1500 words. Key Assignment criteria Performance on this component Comment Very Poor Fair Good Excellent Poor Introduction Critical literature review Methodology Theoretical model and hypotheses Contribution to knowledge Research Design Expected implications Expected limitations Reference list Communication and presentation Summary comment The Graduate qualities being assessed by this assignment are indicated by an X: X GQ1: operate effectively with and upon a GQ5: are committed to ethical action and X body of knowledge social responsibility X GQ3: are effective problem solvers GQ6: communicate effectively X Assignment grade/mark 14
  16. 16. Assessment feedback BUSS5059 Research Methods in Business and Management G Assessment 2 – Research Proposal. Due 7th June, 2009. Worth 50%. Maximum of 3500 words. Key Assignment criteria Performance on this component Comment Very Poor Poor Fair Good Excellent Introduction Critical literature review Theoretical model and hypotheses Research Design Data analysis Expected implications Expected limitations Potential ethical issues Proposed timeline Reference list Communication and presentation Summary comment The Graduate qualities being assessed by this assignment are indicated by an X: X GQ1: operate effectively with and upon a body of GQ5: are committed to ethical action X knowledge and social responsibility X GQ3: are effective problem solvers GQ6: communicate effectively X Assignment grade/mark 15
  17. 17. COURSE CALENDAR—STUDY PERIOD 2, 2009 Seminars  Study Period 2  Topic  Neuman Chapter  Assessment  Week 1 2 March What is research? 1 Week 2 9 March Public Holiday Research Process - Week 3 16 March 2–4 Overview Week 4 23 March Research Process cont. 5–6 Week 5 30 March Measurement and sampling 7–8 Assessment 1: Week 6 6 April Experimental research 9 12th April, 2009 13 April Mid-break 20 April Correlational designs - I 10 Week 7 27 April Correlational designs - II Interviews and focus Week 8 4 May 13 groups Week 9 11 May Case studies 11 Grounded theory and Post- Week 10 18 May structuralist approaches Week 11 25 May Ethical issues in research 5 & 16 Assessment 2: 7th Week 12 01 June Writing up research 16 June, 2009 Week 13 08 June Public Holiday 15 June Review Assessment 3: Note: mid-year examinations Exam Examination. 22 June – 03 commence Saturday June 20 and weeks include Saturdays throughout the July Date and time exam period TBA Course calendars are not set in stone; it is a guide only.   Some topics may be lengthened or reduced to ensure relevance to the particular needs  of the students involved in the course.   16

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