Integral approach: 5 basic components

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English translation of the presentation on Ken Wilber’s Integral framework I created and gave in April 2009 for the top-management of one large Moscow company (upon a friendly request from its owners).

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Integral approach: 5 basic components

  1. 1. Integral approach: 5 basic components
  2. 2. Today we have access to… …all cultures and knowledge in the world
  3. 3. How can we make sure not to get lost?
  4. 4. We need a road map
  5. 5. A bad map* *will not work
  6. 6. A good map is better than a bad map.
  7. 7. Integral approach — perhaps, the most comprehensive, simple, and accurate map
  8. 8. 5 basic factors  Quadrants  Levels  Lines  States  Types
  9. 9. 5 basic factors Tracking them allows you to: • Take into account what’s needed • Fully realize – your own potential – the potential of your activities
  10. 10. Quadrants
  11. 11. Quadrants Basic perspectives on • a human being • any issue Main pronouns: 1st person — “I” 2nd person — “You” (“Thou”) * 3rd person singular — “It” 3rd person plural — “Its” * In the dialogue of “I” + “Thou” the miracle of “We” emerges that is based on mutual understanding
  12. 12. I + YOU = WE I am telling you… IYOU
  13. 13. …about my new bike* * Bicycle — “it. ”
  14. 14. ITS Interobjective connections • ecosystems • environment • systems theory
  15. 15. 4 quadrants — interior and exterior sides of individual and collective dimensions
  16. 16. Left-Hand Quadrants — the interiors
  17. 17. Right-Hand Quadrants — the exteriors
  18. 18. Upper Quadrants — individual dimension
  19. 19. Lower Quadrants — collective dimension
  20. 20. 4 quadrants Each occasion or event can always be looked at through the perspective of each of these quadrants.
  21. 21. 4 quadrants Each occasion or event always manifests simultaneously in all 4 quadrants.
  22. 22. 4 quadrants Therefore, an event that is seen in one quadrant always has correlates in the other three quadrants.
  23. 23. A thought just crossed my mind!
  24. 24. This thought is accompanied by activation of neurons in the brain
  25. 25. My thinking is molded to a large degree by the culture that I inhabit
  26. 26. My organism exists within communicative webs of objective social systems
  27. 27. Thus:
  28. 28. Upper-Left Quadrant • I, the cognizing subject • My direct experiences, feelings, thoughts • Meaning or depth that I find in my activities CONSCIOUSNESS Validity claim: • subjective truthfulness (honesty, sincerity) Example of a methodology: • introspection
  29. 29. Upper-Right Quadrant • It, the cognized object • Objective organism • Objectively measurable: • behavior • neural activation • hormones MATERIAL OBJECT Validity claim: • objective truth Example of a methodology: • biology, physiology
  30. 30. Lower-Left Quadrant • We, cultural context • Interpersonal communication • Worldview shared in the group • Group values • Corporate ethics CULTURE Validity claim: • intersubjective justness Example of methodology: • hermeneutics
  31. 31. Lower-Right Quadrant • Its, interobjective connections • Techno-economic mode of production • Environment, ecosystems SOCIAL SYSTEM Validity claims: • functional fit Example of methodology: • systems theory
  32. 32. Levels of Development
  33. 33. Evolution • Evolution manifests in all quadrants. • Each new level of development transcends but includes the previous one: from matter to life to mind to soul to Spirit; from physics to psychology to theology to mysticism.
  34. 34. Upper-Left (“I”) • Evolution of individual consciousness. • Development of cognitive capacities: • preoperational cognition • concrete operational cognition • formal operational cognition • postformal cognition (vision logic)
  35. 35. Upper-Right (“It”) • Evolution of objective organism. • Evolutionary stages of the brain*: • reptile brain: brain stem • instinctual behavior • basic survival programs • mammalian brain: limbic system • affective reactions • emotional responses • “language of feelings” • human brain: neocortex • thinking • rationality • verbal language * The Triune Brain theory (McLean)
  36. 36. Lower-Left (“We”) • Cultural evolution. • Progress of worldviews: • egocentrism • narcissism (the world as extension of me) • early childhood • ethnocentrism • nationalism (perspective of only my group of people) • fascism • fundamentalism • worldcentrism • cosmopolitism (perspectives of all groups of people in the world) • global ecological consciousness
  37. 37. Lower-Right (“Its”) • Evolution of social systems and technologies. • Techno-economic mode of production: • foraging • horticultural • agrarian • industrial • informational
  38. 38. Lines of Development
  39. 39. Upper-Left (“I”) • Theory of multiple intelligences (H. Gardner) • Lines of development of: • cognition (J. Piaget) • psychosexual (S. Freud) • emotional intelligence (D. Goleman) • hierarchy of needs (A. Maslow) • values (C. Graves, Spiral Dynamics) • self or ego development (S. Cook- Greuter) • moral development (L. Kohlberg) • and so on
  40. 40. Lower-Right (“Its”) • Lines of development: • techno-economic mode of production • geopolitical structures • evolution of social systems / ecosystems
  41. 41. Upper-Right (“It”) • Lines of development: • biological growth • neurophysiological development • evolution of behavior
  42. 42. Lower-Left (“We”) • Lines of development: • cultural worldviews • shared values • mutual understanding • group identity
  43. 43. States of Consciousness
  44. 44. Waking — gross state of consciousness
  45. 45. Dreaming — subtle state of consciousness
  46. 46. Deep dreamless sleep — causal state of consciousness
  47. 47. Types
  48. 48. Typologies • Masculine and feminine types • C. G. Jung’s psychological types • Enneagram
  49. 49. So:
  50. 50. Thank you for your attention!

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