Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
East Asian Images of Japan
Professor Paul Morris 
Professor Naoko Shimazu 
Dr Edward Vickers
Dr Christine Han 
Japan and E...
Japan and East Asia National 
Identities Network (JEANIEN)
Leverhulme Trust
Professor Paul Morris 
Professor Naoko Shimazu...
An Overview:
Analytical Framework and 
Thematic Questions
Naoko Shimazu
Birkbeck, University of London
Four categories as Japan as the ‘Other’
1. normative ‘Other’
2. dominant ‘Other’
3. alternative ‘Other’
4. distant ‘Other’
The Role of Japan in 
Nation Building in Singapore
Simon Avenell
Christine Han
Khatera Khamsi
Avenell, Simon (2013, forthcoming) ‘Beyond 
Mimesis: Japan and the Uses of Political Ideology 
in Singapore’
Khamsi, Khate...
Southeast Asia
Singapore
Singapore
• 1300:  Temasek
• 1819 – 1942:  British colony
• 1942 – 1945:  Japanese Occupation
• 1945 – 1959:  Br...
Images of Japan 
in 
history textbooks 
Introduction of Japanese history in schools:
context
• post‐independence generation ‘lacked knowledge 
about nationhood’ (...
National Education  (Lee Hsien Loong, 1997)
• develop national cohesion, the instinct for survival and 
confidence in our ...
The Singapore Story
• Singapore’s modern history
– founding
– colonial period
– Japanese Occupation
– post‐war history
• s...
• History and Social Studies
• primary and lower secondary
• 1980s, 1990s and 2000s
History textbooks
Findings
• Topics
– Context/Background of the War in Singapore and 
Malaya
– The Course of the War in Singapore and Malaya...
Findings
• Topics
– Context/Background of the War in Singapore and 
Malaya 
– The Course of the War in Singapore and Malay...
Themes
1. Causes of the Fall of Singapore
2. Collaboration and Resistance
3. Suffering
1. Causes of the Fall of Singapore
– effectiveness of Japanese army
– loyalty to country and Emperor
– brave, strong, acti...
2. Collaboration and Resistance
– war heroes represented by all ethnic groups
3. Suffering
– Japanese cruelty emphasised
• Kempeitai, Sook Ching
• atrocities
‘Vivid images are provided – in prose, and...
– violent, selfish, incompetent rulers
• chopping / displaying heads
• taking best supplies for themselves
– vicious, hate...
– ‘Japanising’ the local population ‐ an attack on 
culture and identity
– common suffering
• resilience and resourcefulness of local population
– making soap, shoe polish, frying pans, bottles
– mutual help and co...
• archetypal historical enemy
– Japan’s role as an ‘Other’
• brave, loyal, efficient, strong, active, in control, 
mercile...
Context
• moral panic 1990s
– young people’s 
– ignorance of Singapore history (according to the 
PAP)
– lack of commitmen...
Aim of portrayal of Japanese
• example of hostile ‘Other’ to be repulsed and emulated
• ensure buy in to the National Educ...
Images of Japan in 
the economy and society
Japan and the Uses of 
Political Ideology 
in Singapore:
The ‘Learn From Japan...
The ‘Learn From Japan’ Campaign
• late 1970s – late 1980s
• programmes
– industrial productivity 
movement
– community (gr...
Background factors:
urbanisation
• relocation
– from kampongs to HDBs
• HDB statistics (# of apartments)
1965   52,000
197...
Background factors:
advanced industrialisation
• oil shock (1973)
– disadvantages of low 
value‐added, labour‐
intensive i...
Background factors:
value change
‘Unless we make a concerted effort and 
sustained effort at inculcating into 
(younger Si...
Rediscovering and reimagining Japan 
from the late 1970s
• Japan as an Economic Power 
and Its Implications for 
Southeast...
The Productivity Movement
• fact‐finding missions to Japan
– industrial policy
– productivity
– labour‐management relation...
Vogel’s advice
• Singapore should 
replicate
– Japanese national 
bureaucracy
– Japanese thrift
– desire to learn from 
ab...
Kohei Goshi (JPC) on 
the Japanese Model
• ‘defective’ Western labour‐
management relations
– the ‘human being’ is absent’...
“Teamy”
Japanese Community Policing and
the ‘New Singaporean Man’
• fact‐finding missions & reports (1980s):
Proposals on Introduc...
The Governmental Vision of Community Policing
This new system is designed to bring police into each neighborhood not as sp...
NPPs: Shaping Civic‐mindedness 
“Singapore's extensive and now more intensive 
crime prevention activities are part of the...
Conclusion 
• campaign slows in late 1980s:
– interest in the Swiss model
– resistance / skepticism from 
ordinary Singapo...
Summary:
images of Japan
• the historical enemy
– to be repulsed and emulated
• the Asian social and economic model
• a to...
‘learning about Japan was really about 
teaching people to be productive, patriotic, 
and compliant Singaporeans’
Avenell
Paul Morris and Ed Vickers
Reconstructing Sino‐Japanese 
History in Hong Kong’s Schools 
Context/Background
• HK:
– UK colony 1842‐1997
– Capitalism
– depoliticization
• SAR of the PRC 1997
• PRC
– 1949‐mid 1980...
Purpose & Focus
• What are pupils in Hong Kong expected to 
learn about Japan / the Japanese, and how 
has that changed?
•...
• We also compared 
– the most recent editions with one other popular textbook 
for each of the subjects
• Ling Kee texts ...
Comparison of….
• the space textbooks devote to the coverage of 
Japan 
• the titles of the sections through which the 
te...
World History: Topics
• Japanese modernisation 
• militarism 
• reconstruction and growth after World War II 
• Japan’s po...
Modernisation: messages
• 1996
– success of Japan’s modernisation
– better at learning from ‘the West’
– stress strong lea...
Militarism: Messages
• 1996
– Japan justaposed with other countries
– stresses international context and contingency
– not...
Post WWII Reconstruction/Development
• 1996 ‐ not covered
• 2004 ‐ focus on economic growth
• 2009
– political focus
– end...
Message to HK youth?
• “National qualities that used to be associated with the 
Japanese, such as hard work, discipline an...
Japan’s Post‐war Relations with other Asian 
Countries
• 2004
– stresses US influence
– queries commitment to peace
• 2009...
Chinese History Topics
27, 41, & 42 pp
• Japan’s Invasion of China 
• China’s All Out Resistance against Japan’s 
Invasion...
Japan’s Invasion of China
• 1993: from discrete incidents to war/invasion
• 2005: focus on militarism & continuity (‘How 
...
China’s All Out Resistance against Japan’s 
Invasion
• from 2005
• added: ‘Japans fierce attack on China’s rear 
base’
• u...
Omissions
• Japan’s substantial economic support for the PRC 
from the late 1970s)
• that the Japanese school textbooks th...
Overall
• World History
– from modernization to militarism
– stresses Japan’s current relations with Asian countries as a ...
National Identity Formation 
and the Portrayal of the 
Japanese Occupation 
in post‐war 
Philippine Textbooks and 
Komiks
...
Outline of Presentation
1.Background
a. Philippine history curriculum 
b. Textbook production, regulation and use 
2. Nati...
History Curriculum and Textbooks
• National curriculum = list learning 
competencies (Philippine Education 
Learning Compe...
History Curriculum and Textbooks
• No ‘official’ History or Social Studies 
textbooks; ‘private’ writers 
commissioned by ...
History Curriculum and Textbooks
• Textbooks define the curriculum….it 
is the setter of both the basic agenda 
for classr...
National identity formation in education 
(1)
All PH constitutions (including the one enacted 
in 1943 during JPN occupati...
National identity formation in education 
(2)
Majority in a 1998 nationwide language survey 
do not believe in nationalism...
Portrayal of Japanese Occupation (1)
Yu‐Jose’s (2004) study of 1960‐90’s textbooks
Filipino valor
Economic devastation (wh...
Portrayal of Japanese Occupation (2)
(Maca and Morris 2013 study)
a) Sanitized discussion on colonization and war 
history...
Portrayal of Japanese Occupation (2)
Bataan Death March‐daily burial of dead prisoners
Portrayal of Japanese Occupation (2)
d) Americans as ‘liberators’ and the vilification 
of ‘collaborators’.Resistance as “...
Portrayal of Japanese Occupation (2)
d) Americans as ‘liberators’ and the vilification 
of ‘collaborators’
‐Less ‘hero‐wor...
Summary and Conclusion (1)
• Consistent portrayal of the Japanese as 
the most brutal amongst Filipino 
aggressors 
• Port...
Summary and Conclusion (2)
• Prevailing view and approach to 
history/social studies education (history for 
‘history’s sa...
Summary and Conclusion (3)
• Curriculum thrust on ‘internationalism, or 
global citizenship’ (to promote Filipino 
labor m...
Summary and Conclusion (4)
• Negative portrayal of JPN occupation 
used to portray American colonization in 
a benign ligh...
http://forum.paradoxplaza.com/forum/showthread.php?419128‐
The‐War‐Correspondent‐s‐Notes
Lieutenant Ishikawa in ‘Lakan Dupil: Ang Kahanga‐hangang 
Gerilya’ (Lakan Dupil: The Amazing Guerilla) (Liwayway 12 May 
1...
General Yamashita in  Lakan Dupil: Ang Kahanga‐hangang Gerilya  (Lakan Dupil: The Amazing Guerilla) (Liwayway 25 August 19...
‘Tiagong Lundag’ (Tiago, the Jumper) (Liwayway 20 June 1966, pp. 
39‐40)
‘Kalawang sa Bakal’ (Corrosion of Steel) (Liwayway 13 July 1959, 42)
‘Mga Anak ni Drakula sa Japan’ (The Children of Dracula in Japan) 
(Liwayway 22 March 1972, 32)
A Totem of Chineseness:
Representations of Japan in the 
Museums of Mainland China, 
Taiwan, and Hong Kong
Edward Vickers
...
Public lecture presentation slides (6.28.2013)
Public lecture presentation slides (6.28.2013)
Public lecture presentation slides (6.28.2013)
Public lecture presentation slides (6.28.2013)
Public lecture presentation slides (6.28.2013)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Public lecture presentation slides (6.28.2013)

1,190 views

Published on

<panel> East Asian Images of Japan


Recent disputes between Japan and her regional neighbours have been met with resentful incomprehension by many Japanese - contributing to the election in December 2012 of perhaps the most nationalist Diet since 1945. These developments highlight the persistent gulf between the images most Japanese harbour of their country, and the ways it (and they) are perceived and portrayed by their neighbours. This panel stems from a project that aims to help bridge this gulf and promote a more informed debate about on Japan's relationships with other East Asian societies.

Over the past three years, an international network of scholars based in East Asia, Europe and North America has been looking at the portrayal of Japan in a range of media - school texts, TV, cinema, museums and the internet - in societies including China, Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia and the Philippines. A major international symposium in Fukuoka this September 6-7 will showcase this research. This panel presentation introduces a small sample of work by several of the scholars involved.

Naoko Shimazu first offers an overview of the work of the broader network, discussing the various ways in which Japan is portrayed as an 'Other' in societies throughout East Asia. In the course of outlining the various images of Japan that prevail in different societies, she will discuss why these particular images have emerged, and how they relate to domestic debates over national and local identities.

Paul Morris and Christine Han discuss the cases of Hong Kong and Singapore respectively. While the histories of these societies are in many respects comparable (predominantly ethnic Chinese, former British colonies, occupied by Japan during the Second World War), the kinds of images of Japan that have emerged in the postwar period, and the ways in which these have been produced or manipulated by key elites, reflect important differences in the political and social dynamics that have shaped their recent histories.

Edward Vickers then compares the portrayal of Japan in major national historical museums of the People's Republic of China and Taiwan, focusing particularly on two museums opened or re-opened in 2011: the National Museum of China (Beijing), and the National Museum of Taiwan History (Tainan). He argues that the images of Japan visible in these two flagship institutions reflect both fundamental differences in historical experience vis-a-vis Japan, and the stark divergence in official discourse on national identity within Taiwan and China over recent decades. They also reflect the different ways in which the role of museums has evolved on either side of the Taiwan Strait over recent years - a phenomenon closely related to broader political and social change (or the lack of it).

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Public lecture presentation slides (6.28.2013)

  1. 1. East Asian Images of Japan Professor Paul Morris  Professor Naoko Shimazu  Dr Edward Vickers Dr Christine Han  Japan and East Asia National  Identities Network (JEANIEN) Leverhulme Trust Panel presentation Fri 28 Jun 2013 Temple University
  2. 2. Japan and East Asia National  Identities Network (JEANIEN) Leverhulme Trust Professor Paul Morris  Professor Naoko Shimazu Dr Edward Vickers Dr Christine Han 
  3. 3. An Overview: Analytical Framework and  Thematic Questions Naoko Shimazu Birkbeck, University of London
  4. 4. Four categories as Japan as the ‘Other’ 1. normative ‘Other’ 2. dominant ‘Other’ 3. alternative ‘Other’ 4. distant ‘Other’
  5. 5. The Role of Japan in  Nation Building in Singapore Simon Avenell Christine Han Khatera Khamsi
  6. 6. Avenell, Simon (2013, forthcoming) ‘Beyond  Mimesis: Japan and the Uses of Political Ideology  in Singapore’ Khamsi, Khatera and Han, Christine (2013,  forthcoming) ‘The Portrayal of the Japanese  Occupation in Singaporean Textbook Narratives’ In  Paul Morris, Naoko Shimazu, and Edward Vickers  (eds) (2013, forthcoming) Imagining Japan in  Postwar East Asia, London: Routledge.
  7. 7. Southeast Asia
  8. 8. Singapore Singapore • 1300:  Temasek • 1819 – 1942:  British colony • 1942 – 1945:  Japanese Occupation • 1945 – 1959:  British colony • 1959 – 1963:  Self government • 1963 – 1965:  Merger with Malaysia • 1965 – present:  Independent Singapore
  9. 9. Images of Japan  in  history textbooks 
  10. 10. Introduction of Japanese history in schools: context • post‐independence generation ‘lacked knowledge  about nationhood’ (Goh) ‘Many Singaporeans, especially pupils  and younger Singaporeans, knew little  of our recent history. They did not know  how we became an independent nation,  how we triumphed against long odds, or  how today's peaceful and prosperous  Singapore came about.’ ‐ Lee Hsien Loong, 1997
  11. 11. National Education  (Lee Hsien Loong, 1997) • develop national cohesion, the instinct for survival and  confidence in our future • foster in young a sense of identity, pride and self‐ respect as Singaporeans;  strengthen their emotional  attachment to the nation • each Singapore Story ‐ how Singapore succeeded  against the odds to become a nation…  ‘(including the) 3 years of the Japanese Occupation  Singaporeans suffered a traumatic experience of  cruelty, brutality, hunger, and deprivation’ (Lee)
  12. 12. The Singapore Story • Singapore’s modern history – founding – colonial period – Japanese Occupation – post‐war history • self‐governance • merger • independence • post‐independence history – security, economic, social issues
  13. 13. • History and Social Studies • primary and lower secondary • 1980s, 1990s and 2000s History textbooks
  14. 14. Findings • Topics – Context/Background of the War in Singapore and  Malaya – The Course of the War in Singapore and Malaya – Life during the Japanese Occupation – The End of WWII and of the Japanese Occupation, – Remembrance of the War and the Occupation (viz.  people and sites)
  15. 15. Findings • Topics – Context/Background of the War in Singapore and  Malaya  – The Course of the War in Singapore and Malaya – Life during the Japanese Occupation – The End of WWII and of the Japanese Occupation, – Remembrance of the War and the Occupation (viz.  people and sites) Decreased 28 percentage points Increased 10 percentage points Increased 8 percentage points Increased 7 percentage points
  16. 16. Themes 1. Causes of the Fall of Singapore 2. Collaboration and Resistance 3. Suffering
  17. 17. 1. Causes of the Fall of Singapore – effectiveness of Japanese army – loyalty to country and Emperor – brave, strong, active, in control, merciless, brutal,  cruel, clever, noble Themes
  18. 18. 2. Collaboration and Resistance – war heroes represented by all ethnic groups
  19. 19. 3. Suffering – Japanese cruelty emphasised • Kempeitai, Sook Ching • atrocities ‘Vivid images are provided – in prose, and sometimes  also in pictures – of atrocities being committed, such as  beheadings and displaying severed heads.’ ‐ Khamsi and Han
  20. 20. – violent, selfish, incompetent rulers • chopping / displaying heads • taking best supplies for themselves – vicious, hate‐filled, vengeful • Sook Ching – systematic persecution to ‘wipe out’ anti‐ Japanese elements
  21. 21. – ‘Japanising’ the local population ‐ an attack on  culture and identity
  22. 22. – common suffering
  23. 23. • resilience and resourcefulness of local population – making soap, shoe polish, frying pans, bottles – mutual help and co‐operation ‘irrespective of  ethnicity’
  24. 24. • archetypal historical enemy – Japan’s role as an ‘Other’ • brave, loyal, efficient, strong, active, in control,  merciless, brutal, cruel, clever, noble • both a negative and positive model • downplaying of differences in treatment of ethnic  groups Portrayal of the Japanese
  25. 25. Context • moral panic 1990s – young people’s  – ignorance of Singapore history (according to the  PAP) – lack of commitment to the country • multi‐ethnic society – history of ethnic conflict • vision of the political elite for Singapore
  26. 26. Aim of portrayal of Japanese • example of hostile ‘Other’ to be repulsed and emulated • ensure buy in to the National Education messages – sense of national identity, pride and self‐respect – knowing the Singapore story ‐ how Singapore succeeded  against the odds to become a nation – understanding unique challenges, constraints and  vulnerabilities – instil core values, and the will to prevail  • promote national identity, values, and unity – emphasis on common experience and identity  – downplay differences in treatment
  27. 27. Images of Japan in  the economy and society Japan and the Uses of  Political Ideology  in Singapore: The ‘Learn From Japan’  Campaign
  28. 28. The ‘Learn From Japan’ Campaign • late 1970s – late 1980s • programmes – industrial productivity  movement – community (grassroots)  policing • issues / significance – changing perceptions of  Japan in East Asia (positive /  negative) – Japan and authoritarian  government in Singapore – Japan as model for  Singapore’s  developmentalism
  29. 29. Background factors: urbanisation • relocation – from kampongs to HDBs • HDB statistics (# of apartments) 1965   52,000 1970  121,000 1976  255,000 1980  376,000 • government concerns / objectives – moulding national consciousness – severing strong ethnic ties – dealing with dislocations of  urbanisation
  30. 30. Background factors: advanced industrialisation • oil shock (1973) – disadvantages of low  value‐added, labour‐ intensive industries • economic  restructuring – the ‘Second Industrial  Revolution – reskilled labour force • potential threats – labour militancy
  31. 31. Background factors: value change ‘Unless we make a concerted effort and  sustained effort at inculcating into  (younger Singaporeans) the virtues of  group discipline and the overriding calls  of society upon their individual rights,  more and more will be consciously  influenced by the concepts of Europeans  and Americans: that the rights and  liberties of the individual are the first  charge upon society… The generation now in school are nearly  all in the English language stream, where  the philosophy and doctrines taught are  less Confucianist than the Chinese  language schools; hence the importance  of imparting the traditional values in  moral education in the schools.’ ‐ Lee, quoted in Stanley 1988
  32. 32. Rediscovering and reimagining Japan  from the late 1970s • Japan as an Economic Power  and Its Implications for  Southeast Asia (ISEAS, 1974) ‘Some Southeast Asian  countries fear they are  becoming too dependent on  Japan and are in danger of  losing their economic  sovereignty.’ • wartime legacy: ‘Blood Debt’  Controversy, 1962 • Wee Mon Cheng, Ambassador  to Japan, 1970s, and  ‘Japanophile’ • Lee Kuan Yew – fact‐finding  Mission to Japan, 1979
  33. 33. The Productivity Movement • fact‐finding missions to Japan – industrial policy – productivity – labour‐management relations • radio broadcasts (SBC) – company unionism – worker motivation – consensus decision‐making • support from Japan – Labour Ministry of Japan seminar  (1982) – Japanese specialises • conferences – Learning from the Japanese Experience (1981), Ezra Vogel • public campaigns – ‘Teamy’, the Productivity Bee
  34. 34. Vogel’s advice • Singapore should  replicate – Japanese national  bureaucracy – Japanese thrift – desire to learn from  abroad – government‐business  co‐operation – long‐range planning ‘With carrots and sticks  and a little  administrative  guidance they can get  people to move and  respond.’ Vogel
  35. 35. Kohei Goshi (JPC) on  the Japanese Model • ‘defective’ Western labour‐ management relations – the ‘human being’ is absent’ – confrontation vs co‐ operation – technology and machines  over ‘brains’ • the Japanese approach – The Wind and the Sun – familial relationship  between company and  employee – shared sense of national  vulnerability
  36. 36. “Teamy”
  37. 37. Japanese Community Policing and the ‘New Singaporean Man’ • fact‐finding missions & reports (1980s): Proposals on Introduction of Police Box  System for Reorganization of the  Singaporean Police  (1982) • Japanese police visit Singapore to  provide training • trial NPPs established in 1983 • by 1989: 91 NPPs islandwide • duties: bicycle patrols, home visits,  street directions • no powers of arrest
  38. 38. The Governmental Vision of Community Policing This new system is designed to bring police into each neighborhood not as spies or  thief‐catchers or nosey information gatherers but rather as a part of the  neighborhood.  Hopefully the public will come to see the police officers more as warm and friendly  figures than as authoritarians or disciplinarians (SPF, Singapore Police Life Annual, 1983)
  39. 39. NPPs: Shaping Civic‐mindedness  “Singapore's extensive and now more intensive  crime prevention activities are part of the  country’s tireless effort to improve itself through  exhortation and education. Bill boards  everywhere urge people not to smoke or spit.  (One sign says “Don’t spit, it’s not nice,” showing  a woman turning away in disgust.)”  “The sides of buses and fronts  of buildings carry pictures of  "Teamy, the production bee,"  slogans about having two‐ children families, the logo  reminding people to speak  Mandarin, and invocations of  "Singapore Excellence.” “There is always a campaign of some sort  going on, calling people's attention to an  aspect of life that needs improvement.  For example, [the Courtesy Week]  campaign cited such discourteous behavior  as crunching food loudly in cinemas, driving  slowly in passing lanes, blocking the  entrances to buses, jumping queues at bus  stops, holding noisy mahjongg parties,  staring at others in public, and not keeping  children and pets quiet.”
  40. 40. Conclusion  • campaign slows in late 1980s: – interest in the Swiss model – resistance / skepticism from  ordinary Singaporeans – national differences • successes: – QCCs (WITs) – OJT • ideological utility: – legitimizing authoritarian /  interventionist governance  – fostering national identity (vs ethnic) – promoting conciliatory labor‐ management relations • legacies:
  41. 41. Summary: images of Japan • the historical enemy – to be repulsed and emulated • the Asian social and economic model • a tool for social and economic transformation • a ‘motive force’ (Pempel 1996/7) • cure for social ills – individualism delinquency,  drug abuse, abortion, divorce • an ideological device
  42. 42. ‘learning about Japan was really about  teaching people to be productive, patriotic,  and compliant Singaporeans’ Avenell
  43. 43. Paul Morris and Ed Vickers Reconstructing Sino‐Japanese  History in Hong Kong’s Schools 
  44. 44. Context/Background • HK: – UK colony 1842‐1997 – Capitalism – depoliticization • SAR of the PRC 1997 • PRC – 1949‐mid 1980s ‐ Communism/Maoism as state  ideology – Mid‐1980s ‐ Cold War ending, state capitalism,  nationalism – new friends and foes, new official histories
  45. 45. Purpose & Focus • What are pupils in Hong Kong expected to  learn about Japan / the Japanese, and how  has that changed? • analysis of the most popular Chinese History  and (World) History textbooks. • History:  1996, 2004 and 2009 for History, and  • Chinese History:  1993, 2005 and 2009
  46. 46. • We also compared  – the most recent editions with one other popular textbook  for each of the subjects • Ling Kee texts for World History [Cheung et al 2004 and 2009])  • the Modern Educational Research Society texts for Chinese History  (Chan et al 2004; Lui et al 2009) – little significant variation in terms of the extent and nature  of the coverage between the texts published by different  publishers 
  47. 47. Comparison of…. • the space textbooks devote to the coverage of  Japan  • the titles of the sections through which the  texts are organised  • the portrayal and depiction of the Japanese  that the text is promoting  • the nature of the pictorial images and  questions that are used in the text
  48. 48. World History: Topics • Japanese modernisation  • militarism  • reconstruction and growth after World War II  • Japan’s post‐war relations with other Asian  countries • 47,80,87 pp.
  49. 49. Modernisation: messages • 1996 – success of Japan’s modernisation – better at learning from ‘the West’ – stress strong leadership – admiration for Meiji oligarchs • 2004 + – shifts to a teleology that sees this primarily as a prelude to and  preparation for the wars of the 1930s and 1940s. • the ‘Important Figure File’  – Hirobumi and Meiji (1996 edition) replaced with with Giichi Tanaka and the Showa Emperor (2004 edition) • modernisation – 1996 ‐ 42 pp.  – 2009 ‐20pp.
  50. 50. Militarism: Messages • 1996 – Japan justaposed with other countries – stresses international context and contingency – notes the flourishing of democracy during the Taisho era.  • 2004+ – shifts to 20th century focus – removes comparison with China’s  self‐strengthening; – stresses the subordination of cultural, educational and  scientific endeavour to nationalistic aims – overall • Japan no longer a model of modernisation in the face of Western  aggression • militarism as part of an unbroken narrative of Japan’s early 20th Century history
  51. 51. Post WWII Reconstruction/Development • 1996 ‐ not covered • 2004 ‐ focus on economic growth • 2009 – political focus – endorses one‐party domination of LDP for providing the stability needed  for modernization’ – the LDP’s reduced dominance, the formation of new political parties, and  ‘frequent changes of prime ministers’ are ‘obstacles to political  development’  • notes – increased defence spending – constitutional change – visits to the Yasukuni Shrine – Japan’s attempts to expand the remit of military to deal with ‘surrounding  situations’ have caused ‘the suspicion and disapproval of other Asian  countries’ 
  52. 52. Message to HK youth? • “National qualities that used to be associated with the  Japanese, such as hard work, discipline and collectivism, are  no longer regarded as important. The younger generation has  begun to care more about individualism and consumerism.  Also, the ageing of the population and a greater reliance on  social welfare are two of the major problems now faced by  Japan” (p. 334). • HK’s development is because of laissez‐faire capitalism,   minimal social welfare, achieved through the far‐sighted  leadership of the local elite and the CCP. 
  53. 53. Japan’s Post‐war Relations with other Asian  Countries • 2004 – stresses US influence – queries commitment to peace • 2009 – ‘How did Japanese prime ministers affect the relations between  Japan and China?’ – ‘From the view of Asian countries, is post‐war Japan a friend or  foe?’  • problems:  Japan responsible for – relations with China – Yasukuni Shrine – territorial disputes – Japan’s trade deficit with China – the 1958 ‘Nagasaki National Flag Incident’ • stresses tensions with other Asian countries
  54. 54. Chinese History Topics 27, 41, & 42 pp • Japan’s Invasion of China  • China’s All Out Resistance against Japan’s  Invasion • China’s Foreign Policy during the War of  Resistance
  55. 55. Japan’s Invasion of China • 1993: from discrete incidents to war/invasion • 2005: focus on militarism & continuity (‘How  did Japan set about gradually invading China  from the early 1930s?’) • new topics, e.g. ‘Thwarting the Reunification  of China’ • increased coverage of Nanjing massacre
  56. 56. China’s All Out Resistance against Japan’s  Invasion • from 2005 • added: ‘Japans fierce attack on China’s rear  base’ • use of Mainland historical terminology • KMT recognised • US role reduced:  Pearl Harbour attributed to  China’s prolonged resistance • the local reduced • 2009: Yasakuni Shrine introduced
  57. 57. Omissions • Japan’s substantial economic support for the PRC  from the late 1970s) • that the Japanese school textbooks that have  sparked outrage in China and Korea are little‐ used • that Japanese leaders have formally apologised  for atrocities • that attempts to refer the territorial dispute over  the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands have been rejected  by the PRC • that wartime ‘collaborators’ were not all forced to  do so
  58. 58. Overall • World History – from modernization to militarism – stresses Japan’s current relations with Asian countries as a  continuation of its history – focus on Yasakuni etc • Chinese History – from incidents to causes – pathological militarism – stress on Chinese resistance and Japanese power and  fierceness – reduces US and increases Chinas role in winning war – Yasakuni etc.
  59. 59. National Identity Formation  and the Portrayal of the  Japanese Occupation  in post‐war  Philippine Textbooks and  Komiks Karl Cheng Chua, Mark Maca and Paul Morris
  60. 60. Outline of Presentation 1.Background a. Philippine history curriculum  b. Textbook production, regulation and use  2. National identity formation in education 3. Portrayal of Japanese Occupation a. Previous studies (e.g. Yu‐Jose, 2004) b. Emerging themes (review of 6 textbooks) 4. Conclusion (for the chapter of Maca and  Morris) 5. Case studies on post‐war komiks
  61. 61. History Curriculum and Textbooks • National curriculum = list learning  competencies (Philippine Education  Learning Competencies 2010) • PH history taught in Grades 4‐6 Social  Studies and Grade 7 (HS Year1)  Philippine History subjects; (6 books  were reviewed) • JPN occupation covered in 4 grade  levels as separate unit; or subsumed  under WWII American colonial  government in the PH
  62. 62. History Curriculum and Textbooks • No ‘official’ History or Social Studies  textbooks; ‘private’ writers  commissioned by DepEd • ‘Deregulated’ production and use of  textbooks; allegedly to curb  corruption • DepED role delimited to vetting of  manuscripts alignment to national  curriculum
  63. 63. History Curriculum and Textbooks • Textbooks define the curriculum….it  is the setter of both the basic agenda  for classroom activity and principal  sourcebook for both teachers and  students (Hornedo, et al, 2000, p.vi) • Error‐riddled textbooks controversy   (in 2007,DepED released  21‐page  errata guide for 11 social studies  textbooks )
  64. 64. National identity formation in education  (1) All PH constitutions (including the one enacted  in 1943 during JPN occupation) emphasize  nationalism in education; failure to translate  policy to education programming PH did not indulge in political indoctrination‐ amorphous national identity and weak  nationalist consciousness (Constantino, 1978) 95% of students would choose a different  nationality and ranked PH 3rd (after US and  JPN) among countries to be ‘admired, lived in  and defended.’ (Doronila, 1989)
  65. 65. National identity formation in education  (2) Majority in a 1998 nationwide language survey  do not believe in nationalism through common  language of instruction  (Gonzales, 1999);  mother‐tongue based multilingual education  (MTB‐MLE) policy in 2012 in the new Kto12  curriculum US is still portrayed as ‘accidental colonizers’ in  textbooks (Diokno, 2010) Catholic Church banned ‘anti‐friar’ novels of  national hero, Jose Rizal
  66. 66. Portrayal of Japanese Occupation (1) Yu‐Jose’s (2004) study of 1960‐90’s textbooks Filipino valor Economic devastation (which led to hunger and  breakdown of law and order) Collaboration ‘Independence’ given by the Japanese was not  real; puppet government Occupation ‘delayed’ PH independence from US Japanese propaganda  (i.e. use of   Tagalog/Philippine language) and control of means  of communication Negative towards local guerillas (relegated to  banditry)
  67. 67. Portrayal of Japanese Occupation (2) (Maca and Morris 2013 study) a) Sanitized discussion on colonization and war  history ‐neutral tone; avoids using the label  ‘colonization’ b)Declining coverage of the Japanese  occupation‐ e.g. 7 out of 152 pages of PH  colonial history c) Declining ‘shock value’ in presentation of  themes of destruction and suffering ‐ Less pictures, more ‘caricatures; harrowing  pictures of ‘Death March’ removed (next slide)
  68. 68. Portrayal of Japanese Occupation (2) Bataan Death March‐daily burial of dead prisoners
  69. 69. Portrayal of Japanese Occupation (2) d) Americans as ‘liberators’ and the vilification  of ‘collaborators’.Resistance as “Bandits ‐Less ‘hero‐worship’ of Filipino anti‐Japanese  war heroes; less vilification of ‘collaborators’ from elite class e) Emphasis on ‘good’ Filipino‐Japanese post‐ war relations 5) Today, we have forgiven the Filipinos who collaborated and  the Japanese who did atrocities to our people. We have good  relations with the Japanese today. (Zaide 2010, p.160) f) The Americans as war heroes ‐ JPN atrocities overshadowed by grand  narrative about American ‘liberators’
  70. 70. Portrayal of Japanese Occupation (2) d) Americans as ‘liberators’ and the vilification  of ‘collaborators’ ‐Less ‘hero‐worship’ of Filipino anti‐Japanese  war heroes; less vilification of ‘collaborators’ from elite class e) Emphasis on ‘good’ Filipino‐Japanese post‐ war relations 5) Today, we have forgiven the Filipinos who collaborated and  the Japanese who did atrocities to our people. We have good  relations with the Japanese today. (Zaide 2010, p.160) f) The Americans as war heroes ‐ JPN atrocities overshadowed by grand  narrative about American ‘liberators’
  71. 71. Summary and Conclusion (1) • Consistent portrayal of the Japanese as  the most brutal amongst Filipino  aggressors  • Portrayal is depoliticized; emphasis on  good post‐war relations • No indictment of colonization (including  the US and Spanish colonization) • Muted portrayal of the ‘threatening  other’ (i.e. Japan) in the curricula (as  compared to other Asian countries)
  72. 72. Summary and Conclusion (2) • Prevailing view and approach to  history/social studies education (history for  ‘history’s sake, apolitical); education goals  stops short at  token ‘nationalism’ • Dominance of moral (1990s) and peace  (2000s) education in social studies  curriculum; focus on harmony and  reconciliation • ‘Politics of reconciliation and forgetting’ (Nakano, 2011); attitude of political leaders  towards Japan‐Philippine economic relations  takes precedence; overseas
  73. 73. Summary and Conclusion (3) • Curriculum thrust on ‘internationalism, or  global citizenship’ (to promote Filipino  labor migration) eclipses ‘nationalism’ • Limitations in education resources  (manifested in DepED prescribed no. of  pages per textbook due to budget  constraints)
  74. 74. Summary and Conclusion (4) • Negative portrayal of JPN occupation  used to portray American colonization in  a benign light • Narration of facts and events; not woven  into a ‘national’ narrative of anticolonial suffering, struggle and heroism • Philippines can be portrayed as the ‘anti‐ developmental state’ ; failure of the state  to exert strong central control of the  education system (Maca and Morris,  2012)
  75. 75. http://forum.paradoxplaza.com/forum/showthread.php?419128‐ The‐War‐Correspondent‐s‐Notes
  76. 76. Lieutenant Ishikawa in ‘Lakan Dupil: Ang Kahanga‐hangang  Gerilya’ (Lakan Dupil: The Amazing Guerilla) (Liwayway 12 May  1946, 32)
  77. 77. General Yamashita in  Lakan Dupil: Ang Kahanga‐hangang Gerilya  (Lakan Dupil: The Amazing Guerilla) (Liwayway 25 August 1946, 34) General Yamashita in ‘Lakan Dupil: Ang Kahanga‐hangang  Gerilya’ (Lakan Dupil: The Amazing Guerilla) (Liwayway 25  August 1946, 34)
  78. 78. ‘Tiagong Lundag’ (Tiago, the Jumper) (Liwayway 20 June 1966, pp.  39‐40)
  79. 79. ‘Kalawang sa Bakal’ (Corrosion of Steel) (Liwayway 13 July 1959, 42)
  80. 80. ‘Mga Anak ni Drakula sa Japan’ (The Children of Dracula in Japan)  (Liwayway 22 March 1972, 32)
  81. 81. A Totem of Chineseness: Representations of Japan in the  Museums of Mainland China,  Taiwan, and Hong Kong Edward Vickers Kyushu University

×