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China’s New Navy and Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

China’s New Navy and Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

Slides presentation at the ICAS public lecture on Oct 24
Speaker:Richard Salmons, Adjunct Professor at Temple University, Japan Campus

Slides presentation at the ICAS public lecture on Oct 24
Speaker:Richard Salmons, Adjunct Professor at Temple University, Japan Campus

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China’s New Navy and Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

  1. 1. China’s new navy and status-seeking in contested Asia
  2. 2. The PLA Navy’s recent addition(s)
  3. 3. The new fleet in the popular Chinese imagination
  4. 4. Main ideas For scholars: HADR lets China play the status role of regional order provider For policymakers: The West’s HADR narrative has created its own reality in the region For the public: China’s navy need not fight the US Navy, if it can replace it
  5. 5. 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami US Deployed: ▷ 25 ships, including aircraft carrier ▷ 15,000 personnel ▷ 103 aircraft Indonesian attitudes: 79% said post-tsunami aid had “improved their impression of America” US officials: Declared a ‘soft power’ win
  6. 6. ▷ Signals commitment ▷ Demonstrates capabilities ▷ Pretext for engagement Strategic aspects of HADR
  7. 7. Chinese priorities ▷ Neutralise perception of ‘China threat’ ▷ Match regional competitors ▷ Address nationalist sentiment
  8. 8. Why HADR builds status ▷ Not as ‘status symbol’ alone… ▷ … But through responsible regional roles… ▷ … Performed sufficiently dramatically to shift perceptions
  9. 9. Implications More ambitious PLAN ▷ Greater citizen protection? ▷ On patrol in the Pacific? US and allies’ monopoly ▷ China as a competitor in international ‘public goods’ Chinese order ▷ Giving legitimacy to a ‘Chinese order’ – with Chinese rules “China’s carrier- centered navy is not designed so much to challenge U.S. maritime supremacy as to inherit it.” - Sam Roggeveen, Lowy Institute
  10. 10. Questions and comments

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