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Crowdsourcing urban sustainability.
Data, people and technologies in participatory governance.
(forth. Futures, 2015)
Chia...
How the extensive use of
crowdsourcing tools can advance the
governance of
1. We make a bibliometric analysis of the scientific
production in the field of crowdsourcing and
governance of urban sust...
1. bibliometric analysis
Fig.1
Fig.2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
2. Dominant paths of research
• Interdisciplinary interest for environmental management in urban
areas
• crowdsourcing in ...
a) urban sustainability
Participation
Multidimensionality
Purposiveness
Equality
Transparency
Collaboration
Cooperation
Ad...
b) participatory processes and ICT
enabling people to
collaborate with
professional
researchers
democracy
&
innovation
Howe, 2006; Albors, Ramos, and Hervas, 2008; Brabham, 2008; Brabham, 2009) )
c) crowdsourcing
crowdsourcing processes
focus on people’s
technological agency
performed by using personal
ICTs for collective peer-
produ...
problem solving, creative input generation,
opinion poll, outsourcing task, or raising
money for the sake of the proposing...
Toward crowdsourced urban sustainability
governance?
Openness
Transparency
Interoperability
Adaptability
Thank you
c.certo...
Crowdsourcing urban sustainability - Data, people and technologies in participatory governance
Crowdsourcing urban sustainability - Data, people and technologies in participatory governance
Crowdsourcing urban sustainability - Data, people and technologies in participatory governance
Crowdsourcing urban sustainability - Data, people and technologies in participatory governance
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Crowdsourcing urban sustainability - Data, people and technologies in participatory governance

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Chiara Certomà, Filippo Corsini, Francesco Rizzi
Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna

While crowdsourcing was originally defined as a web based business model requiring volun-tary open collaboration in the development of creative solutions, it is now generally under-stood in the both scientific and grey literature as an online distributed innovation process that mobilises a number of dedicated tools for significant results also in public research and gov-ernance, too. We argue that interest in crowdsourcing has expanded from computing re-searches to social and environmental applications. This new practical dimension unlocks the futures of integration of crowdsourcing into best practices in the governance of sustainability in an urban context. It can thus be key in addressing challenging urban sustainability issues (such as energy consumption, transport efficiency, deprivation and unequal access to re-sources, water and sanitation, sewage, and the availability and distribution of environmental services).
Our analysis indicates that a transformative relationship between data and people creates new forms of distant search for solutions and decision making. On the basis of these results, significant contributions are further analysed in order to highlight the most promising trends. These include (1) the (often non-trivial) definition of urban sustainability and its metrics; (2) the relation between participatory processes, enabled by social web and interactive ICTs, and governance processes; and (3) the increase, definition and forthcoming development of crowdsourcing tools and processes.
Building on evidence that implementing crowdsourcing into the forthcoming governance of urban sustainability is increasingly recognised as a common priority, the paper suggests policy makers to devote more resources to:
I. “openness”: encouraging the extension of open access data, as suggested by the European Commission endorsement to open up public sector data for re-use across Europe (on the basis of recent evidence, this will become increasingly common in the near future) ;
II. “transparency”: extending crowdsourcing platforms by fostering the transpar-ency obtained through this flow of information;
III. “interoperability”: integrating crowdsourced data with open government data;
IV. “adaptability”: preventing technological and infrastructural lock-ins that could give rise to new hidden monopolies.

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Crowdsourcing urban sustainability - Data, people and technologies in participatory governance

  1. 1. Crowdsourcing urban sustainability. Data, people and technologies in participatory governance. (forth. Futures, 2015) Chiara Certomà, Filippo Corsini, Francesco Rizzi Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna
  2. 2. How the extensive use of crowdsourcing tools can advance the governance of
  3. 3. 1. We make a bibliometric analysis of the scientific production in the field of crowdsourcing and governance of urban sustainability; 1. We identify and classify the main theoretical contributions; 1. We ‘join the dots’ in order to develop new theoretical perspectives.
  4. 4. 1. bibliometric analysis Fig.1
  5. 5. Fig.2
  6. 6. Fig. 3
  7. 7. Fig. 4
  8. 8. 2. Dominant paths of research • Interdisciplinary interest for environmental management in urban areas • crowdsourcing in environmental governance • importance of participatory practices and the possibilities offered by ICTs significant contributions on: a) definition of urban sustainability; b) relation between participatory processes, enabled by social web and interactive ICTs, and governance processes; c) increase, definition and forthcoming development of crowdsourcing tools and processes.
  9. 9. a) urban sustainability Participation Multidimensionality Purposiveness Equality Transparency Collaboration Cooperation Adaptability
  10. 10. b) participatory processes and ICT enabling people to collaborate with professional researchers democracy & innovation
  11. 11. Howe, 2006; Albors, Ramos, and Hervas, 2008; Brabham, 2008; Brabham, 2009) ) c) crowdsourcing
  12. 12. crowdsourcing processes focus on people’s technological agency performed by using personal ICTs for collective peer- production to record, measure, report on the external environment; for sharing opinion, ideas and experiences, for elaborating data and creating open- innovation
  13. 13. problem solving, creative input generation, opinion poll, outsourcing task, or raising money for the sake of the proposing organisation itself 3. Current trends and future integration between crowdsourcing and the governance of urban sustainability private organisations (Smetts, 2011; Brabham, 2013; Seltzer, Mahmoudi, 2012; Shirky, 2008) public sector information gathering, large-scale data analysis, ideation problems with empirically provable solutions or where solutions are matters of taste by fostering innovative contributions in research-design or policy- making
  14. 14. Toward crowdsourced urban sustainability governance? Openness Transparency Interoperability Adaptability Thank you c.certoma@sssup.it

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