Chapter 13<br />The Rise of a Mass Democracy<br />1824-1840<br />
Key Role-players<br />John Quincy Adams<br />Martin Van Buren<br />Andrew Jackson<br />John C. Calhoun<br />Henry Clay<br />
Jackson <br />“Old Hickory” – nickname representing his physical toughness.  Well known for intense passions, flaring temp...
Key Events<br />
The Spoils System<br />Rewarded patrons of the government with high political positions of employment<br />Introduced on a...
Tariff Of Abominations<br />Put into effect in 1828<br />Issued by John Quincy Adams<br />Was intended to protect the Amer...
The Trail of Tears<br />Between 1838 and 1839, 17,000 Cherokee Indians, were rounded up by the government and forced from ...
The Texas AnnexationMexican or Texican?<br />1821- Mexico gains freedom from Spain<br />1822 – Stephen F. Austin founds th...
The Two-Party System<br />By 1840, the national “Republican” identity had died out			Theme<br />Jacksonian Democrats -  su...
DBQ<br />Between the period of 1824 to 1840 what were the significant changes in America‘s political election system and w...
Document A<br />A quote from an Anti-Jackson Newspaper of the election of 1828<br />“General Jackson’s mother was a Common...
Document B<br />A song/slogan of the election of 1840 supporting Van Buren<br />“Rockabye, baby, Daddy&apos;s a Whig <br /...
Document C<br />An except from Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, 1831-1832<br />	The cares of political life e...
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Chapter 13

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Chapter 13, The American Pageant, 12th edition

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Chapter 13

  1. 1. Chapter 13<br />The Rise of a Mass Democracy<br />1824-1840<br />
  2. 2. Key Role-players<br />John Quincy Adams<br />Martin Van Buren<br />Andrew Jackson<br />John C. Calhoun<br />Henry Clay<br />
  3. 3. Jackson <br />“Old Hickory” – nickname representing his physical toughness. Well known for intense passions, flaring temper, and occasional duel<br />Gained political fervor in the West via boastful campaigning<br />Won the election of 1824 over Adams, Crawford, and Clay. Succeeded John Quincy Adams as the 7th president of the nation<br />Strong Anti-Federalist, promoted western Democracy; the “Common Man”<br />Unusually high number of vetos as president, defiant to Supreme Court<br />Believed in the preservation of the Union at all costs<br />The “Smoking Gun” of the White House<br />
  4. 4. Key Events<br />
  5. 5. The Spoils System<br />Rewarded patrons of the government with high political positions of employment<br />Introduced on a large scale<br />Supported by Jackson himself<br />“Every man is as good as his neighbor-perhaps equally better” – Jackson-<br />Contributed to the development of the two-party system<br />
  6. 6. Tariff Of Abominations<br />Put into effect in 1828<br />Issued by John Quincy Adams<br />Was intended to protect the American industry from European competition<br />Actually crippled the already economically troubled South<br />Caused an up rise in hostility between the North and the South<br />John C. Calhoun secretly contributed to the denouncement of the tariff<br />
  7. 7. The Trail of Tears<br />Between 1838 and 1839, 17,000 Cherokee Indians, were rounded up by the government and forced from their homes due to Jackson’s mission of western expansion<br />They crossed the southern part of Illinois into Missouri, then finally reaching Indian Territory, now known as Oklahoma. <br />On the way 4,ooo died from exposure and fatigue. This is why this trail is now known as the Trail of Tears.<br />
  8. 8. The Texas AnnexationMexican or Texican?<br />1821- Mexico gains freedom from Spain<br />1822 – Stephen F. Austin founds the colony of Texas<br />1835/36 - Texas war for independence <br />1836 – Crockett vs. Santa Anna @ The Alamo (Santa Anna wins)<br />1836 – Houston vs. Santa Anna @ San Jacinto (Houston wins)<br />Remember the Alamo<br />
  9. 9. The Two-Party System<br />By 1840, the national “Republican” identity had died out Theme<br />Jacksonian Democrats - supported the individualism of the single American<br />Whigs - supported the natural harmony of society and the value of community.<br />Ex: a renewed national bank, protective tariffs, internal improvements, public schools, and moral reforms, such as the prohibition of liquor and the abolition of slavery.<br />
  10. 10. DBQ<br />Between the period of 1824 to 1840 what were the significant changes in America‘s political election system and what how did the public respond to these changes?<br />
  11. 11. Document A<br />A quote from an Anti-Jackson Newspaper of the election of 1828<br />“General Jackson’s mother was a Common Prostitute, brought to this country by the British soldiers! She afterwards married a mulatto man with whom she had several children”<br />
  12. 12. Document B<br />A song/slogan of the election of 1840 supporting Van Buren<br />“Rockabye, baby, Daddy&apos;s a Whig <br />When he comes home, hard cider he&apos;ll swig <br />When he has swug <br />He&apos;ll fall in a stu <br />And down will come Tyler and Tippecanoe. <br />Rockabye, baby, when you awake <br />You will discover Tip is a fake. <br />Far from the battle, war cry and drum <br />He sits in his cabin a&apos;drinking bad rum. <br />Rockabye, baby, never you cry <br />You need not fear OF Tip and his Ty. <br />What they would ruin, Van Buren will fix. <br />Van&apos;s a magician, they are but tricks.”<br />
  13. 13. Document C<br />An except from Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, 1831-1832<br /> The cares of political life engross a most prominent place in the occupation of a citizen in the United States; and almost the only pleasure of which an American has any idea, is to take a part in the Government, and to discuss the part he has taken. This feeling pervades the most trifling habits of life; even the women frequently attend public meetings, and listen to political harangues as a recreation after their household labours. Debating clubs are to a certain extent a substitute for theatrical entertainments: an American cannot converse, but he can discuss; and when he attempts to talk he falls into a dissertation. He speaks to you as if he was addressing a meeting; and if he should chance to warm in the course of the discussion, he will infallibly say &apos;Gentlemen,&apos; to the person with whom he is conversing. . . .<br />

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