Reconsidering talent development in a connective era

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Nurturing unusual learners often requires unusual educational approaches. Connective and personal learning offers different ways of thinking about learning processes and intents, especially for those who seek– and thrive in– complexity. Conversely, gifted education theory, developed for the "edges," may offer insights into how new and "edge" theories such as connectivism and personal learning can benefit all learners.

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  • Girls are especially vulnerable to pleasing behaviors, pressures (Ruf) (And probably oldest and only children as well) Going to school
    Learning “subjects” Robinson says: subjcts to devisive, suggest content coverage, and are arranged in a tacit hierarchy. “Disciplines” better-- suggest kind of thinking, not just content. And Kinds of thinking are shared across “disciplines.” Me: so transdisciplanry thingking, applied to problems rather than coverage, offer best option for learning.
    Learning with age-based peers
    Teachers know what you must know
    Learners must be measured (i.e. grades)
    Education is linear and finishes with a degree
    Gifted students get straight “A’s”
    One statement Grainne made will stand out, and should be repeated to all undergraduate students. Acquiring knowledge and recalling it, she said, is no longer adequate - it's not really learning anymore.
    Ham story
    Idea that if we do more of this, and get better at it, we we “solve” education problems
    Technology will, eventually, kill the academic calendar. Downes 10/17/10
    Parents of highly intelligent children focus on visible qualities such as right answers, cleanliness, and good manners, whereas parents of highly creative children focus on less-visible qualities, such as openness to experience, interests, imagination, and enthusiasm. Very organized and clean home environments can stifle children’s creativity. http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2010/10/the-decline-of-creativity-in-the-united-states-5-questions-for-educational-psychologist-kyung-hee-kim/
  • Many presume delivery model of learning

    Dual enrollment= PSEO
    Supplemental enrollment= online plus local
    Teachers are well-intentioned but struggling-- not a lot of models, teacher’s education is not keeping up. School choice
    Alternative Learning
    Dual enrollment
    Supplemental enrollment
    Community schooling
    Exchange programs
    Homeschooling
    Unschooling

    Need a law, like special ed, that says every kids gets an individualized learning plan.
    In the meantime, sit down with your child and dream one up.

    What to do:
    1. Use the new tools to participate or become aware of conversations of interest
    2. Visit other schooling models. consider having your child visit.

    Get/model skills in deciding, finding, creating and connecting: Model learning as a hobby.
    Follow one blog
    RSS feeds
    Google alerts
    Legitimate perip. participation
    If gited is your concern, there are a number of opportunities to conenct ith other parents of figfted adn gifted adults and keep informed on a daily basis. this information is valuable as you deterine what other stesp you want to take.
    Help your children find mentors
    Begabungs
      
    1. mentoring 2. enrichment 3. acceleration http://www.renzullilearning.com/default.aspx #ntchat
    about 15 hours ago via web
    Evaluate activities and assignments based on autonomy, diversity, openness and connectivity. AP classes are like training to swim the English channel by only ever having been in a pool. You can work really hard, but you’re not coping with the complexity. Plus, gifted kids can probably do AP work without a class- self study.
    Say no
    Say yes
    Keep a personal time log. Identify where cognitive surplus is being leached: TV Facebook
    Do something that makes you uneasy.
    Change your: hair, furniture, route to work, meal plan, etc.
    If this is new for your kids, don’t expect an immediate positive response. Coasting, similarity, familiarity are EASY. Changes are HARD. (may not always be appropriate for overexcitabilities/twice exceptional)
    Make arrangements for your children to produce representations of their work-- portfolios that contain things done outside of or beyond formal academic demands. Communicate the value of these activities and attempts. Steal time-- yes, from school. On the other side: teachers need to accept alternative proposals. Consider non-graded activities. (Read Joe Bower) Create alternative recognition programs. (Kids themselves don’t recognize creativity in their midst. Adults with assumptions won’t either.)
    http://www.learninggeneralist.com/2010/11/understanding-tools-of-social-learning.html

    You are the keeper of your child’s time. Evaluate how it is being spent. Including assignments. But understand it’s not the teacher’s job to completely replace everything. This is a cooperative zone. It is not their job to serve your child or you. It is to assist. Make an “accepting proposals” zone and time period. Remember that not all attempts will succeed. That’s OK-- you will be assessing on evidence of work, not “success.” If you are using social tools-- bookmarking, etc, this will be easier to see. “I went to the library” doesn’t cut it. Notes on what you looked at does. A bunch of websites doesn’t cut it. But highlighted and commented sections on the bookmarks shows they have been read.

    Gifted ed is problematic because it does not recognize manyof the shifts taking place-- is trying to tinker, improve within the existing structures. Most gifted ed literature is still hidden behind paywalls, closed academic journals. Some cracks with Gifted ed chat., etc. Chat itself is unsophisticated, but finding the poeple and what they are doing in depth is significant.

    You are not looking for a good transcript, you are looking for a good-- or several good- tribes.


  • http://www.dukegiftedletter.com/articles/vol5no1_ef.html

  • Freeman explains that in her study it often appeared that high pressured academic institutions could be the least flexible. And, with the advantage of a long-range zoom, this kind of inflexibility, which may look good in the short run, can potentially lead to problems further down the line for such individuals. “Pressure to succeed,” she insists, “can cripple the gifted with perfectionism.”
    To honor those who are good at everything (valedictorians) is really a backwards, non-incentivizing idea.
    alfiekohn
      
    42-nation study: highly sig neg correlation betw avg level of competitiveness & degree of life satisfaction: J Cross-Cult Psy 7/02
    Jenifer Fox- Your Child’s Strengths: The most hiring in higher in high ed? Mental health services. We can get them into college, get them the test scores and the transcripts, but they’re not happy there, doing well there. Admissions based on preserving competitive rankings in national magazines- soundbites.
    And if we really want kids to be competitive in their passion, we’d let them specialize.
    On Thursday 4th November 2010, @anderscj said:
    "I find myself coming to realize that what hampers their thinking, what drives them into these narrow and defensive strategies, is a feeling that they must please grownups at all costs. The really able thinkers in our class turn out to be, without exception, children who don't feel so strongly the need to please grownups. Some of them are good students, some not so good; but good or not, they don't work to please us, but to please themselves." Holt bookclub from anderscj John Holt's (1964) How Children Fail

    DeborahMersino
      
    As many as 90 percent of IDed GT students are Type 1s (intriguing!). These are kids that have "learned the system." #gtchat on Bett’s table -- approval-seeking DeborahMersino
      
    RT @heymrssmith Many GT progams are filled with Type 1's teachers need more training to understand what Gifted may look like #gtchat <=YES!!
    3 minutes ago via web
    40% (843) of all accredited, bachelor-degree granting schools in the United States have dropped their ACT/SAT admissions test requirements for all or may applicants.
  • Today’s schools are the result of quirks of history.
    The “encyclopedia” problem
    The “pleasing” problem
    Behind the scenes:
    National “creativity crisis”
    10%- 20% “non-graduates”
    20% of K-12 learners in Minnesota are not in a “traditional” neighborhood school (2008-2009)
    Cultural perception and emphasis on “intelligence” and academic achievement over creativity- now a crisis.
    The correlation to lifetime creative accomplishment was more than three times stronger for childhood creativity than childhood IQ.Newsweek
    6 areas of creavity- dropped in 20 years 4-36% (greatest drop in “elaboration” area

    Encyclopedias-- parents bought huge printed set. Defining knowledge, making it available. Now: Totally out of date, can’t get rid of them. On display at Sears for “atmosphere.” Large institutions are limited in ability to change their stories i.e. grasp and implement change.

    willrich45
      
    More often than not, trying to make sense of the #edreform conversation makes my head hurt. All about knowing more, not learning more.
    less than a minute ago via TweetDeck

    Curriculum decisions made by 9-11 old white guys from Harvard in 1892, tweaked by fears unleashed by Sputnik in 1957, and worsened by 1983’s “A Nation at Risk” Where the post-war/pre-sputnik educational concerns were largely demographic—first the colleges trying to accommodate returning veterans, the likes of which had not been seen before, then quickly the schools doing the same for the young baby boomers. In contrast, the post-Sputnik concerns were curricular, focusing on what was being taught and how, rather than who was being taught. Another difference between the two eras was the assignment of blame. The military and the politicians received the blame for Pearl Harbor, not educators; in the Sputnik instance, the finger of blame quickly and sternly pointed at the schools. The third difference has to do with the public perception of the outcomes of the two reform movements: the first is almost unanimously regarded as a great success, a milestone in the history of American education not unlike that of the Morrill Act in the last century, while the second is widely regarded as having failed. http://www.nationalacademies.org/sputnik/ruther1.htm
    Typical story: educating good citizens, providing common ground and equal opportunity.
    Fear
    Control
    Competition

    Many teachers are fabulously successful, and excellent-- based on the succesof their students by the traditional understandings. Teachers being prepared fror traditional model of the classroom-- Richardson

    Definition of success is “book smartness”, which is actually based on passive recall.
    Speaking to you as someone who has worked outside of the traditional boxes

    grad rate stats: http://www.all4ed.org/files/Minnesota_wc.pdf

    Many people believe that if you can get people a good education, they can get themselves out of poverty. Almost backwards. No matter how much you stuff people full of knowledge, particularly knowledge irrelevant to their personal situation, their daily circumstances will always loom larger than an imagined potential. If you are in constant physical pain, it makes it hard to do anything else. Same here with hunger and desperation which create physcial and psychological pain.
  • I’ve been traveling in these “pockets” of unevenily distributed futures in learning. Experiencing a great deal of cognitive dissonance between what I’m expereincing in that culture, and the culture in which much of the current K-12 educational discussions are located.

    In the UK alone, for example, the last 5 years have seen four major educational futures projects,8
    Principle 1: educational futures work should aim to challenge assumptions rather than present definitive predictions
    Principle 2: the future is not determined by its technologies
    Principle 3: thinking about the future always involves values and politics
    Principle 4: education has a range of responsibilities that need to be reflected in any inquiry into or visions of its future
    The next 25 years?: future scenarios and future directions for education and technology
    K. Facer & R. Sandford Education and Social Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University and Futurelab, UK
    Correspondence to Keri Facer, Education and Social Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University, 799 Wilmslow Road, Didsbury, Manchester M20 2RR, UK. Email: K.Facer@mmu.ac.uk

  • Change patterns of unprecedented magnitude
    Severe lag in a conceptual grasp of change, and in cognitive and affective understanding
    Schools, school policy, excels at keeping everyone focused on the minutae, the day to day, on operating in near-crisis mode due to the weight of demands from all sectors of society. Futures thinking is way to try and get a handle on change, to make it less tressful in some ways, to be more prepared, if only by understanding the potential of change in an everyday, rather than exhaustingly monumental way.
    In his formulation, the sense of coherence has three components:
    Comprehensibility: a belief that things happen in an orderly and predictable fashion and a sense that you can understand events in your life and reasonably predict what will happen in the future.
    Manageability: a belief that you have the skills or ability, the support, the help, or the resources necessary to take care of things, and that things are manageable and within your control.
    Meaningfulness: a belief that things in life are interesting and a source of satisfaction, that things are really worth it and that there is good reason or purpose to care about what happens.
    According to Antonovsky, the third element is the most important.
    Change fatigue
  • edevolving
    Obstacles: Structural, Conceptual, Worldview, Psychological, Neuroscience
      
    RT @chadratliff "If at first an idea is not absurd, there is no hope for it." -A. Einstein

    A historical, testosterone-fueled focus on conceptualizations of leadership and the idea of thought leaders.
  • tendency to admire problems, pound away at them, rather than move to a solution

    edevolving
    Obstacles: Structural, Conceptual, Worldview, Psychological, Neuroscience
      
    RT @chadratliff "If at first an idea is not absurd, there is no hope for it." -A. Einstein

    A historical, testosterone-fueled focus on conceptualizations of leadership and the idea of thought leaders.
  • In 2008, Americans consumed information for about 1.3 trillion hours, an average of almost 12 hours per day. Consumption totaled 3.6 zettabytes and 10,845 trillion words, corresponding to 100,500 words and 34 gigabytes for an average person on an average day. A zettabyte is 10 to the 21st power bytes, a million million gigabytes. These estimates are from an analysis of more than 20 different sources of information, from very old (newspapers and books) to very new (portable computer games, satellite radio, and Internet video). Information at work is not included. http://hmi.ucsd.edu/howmuchinfo_research_report_consum.php
    Default overlaod coping strategies: http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/jason.frand/researcher/articles/info_overload.html
    The first coping mechanism identified by Miller is the strategy of omission, or the temporary non-processing of information. This is essentially a state of mental fatigue where we feel as if we are spread much too thin. The feeling that we just cannot deal with all the information flowing to us results in our ignoring or failing to process some of the information.
    A second coping strategy is processing information readily at hand, even if it is bad or incorrect information. This describes the concept of GIGO or "garbage in, garbage out." W orking with poor information at the start This involves working with information that may not be the best and making decisions or acting based upon this information. This effectively casts doubt on thethe outcomes of actions and decisions made using this information because of working with poor information at the start. For example, it is not uncommon to observe an individual performing a search on the World Wide Web and using only the first few items in the results whether they are good or not.
    A third strategy is queuing or delaying the processing of some information with the hope of catching up later. In other words, we may stack up a bunch of information believing we can go through it all at once at a later time. Unfortunately the flow of information does not always slow enough to get back to those piles.
    A fourth strategy is information filtering or looking at information at a higher level and saying, "I will go through this and I won't go through that." It is putting items into categories then working with those categories of information, prior to working with the information itself.
    A fifth strategy is simply walking away from the task.
    A sixth strategy is generalizing ? using minimal information to draw broad conclusions. This is akin to reading only the headlines of a newspaper and speaking as if knowing the details of the articles.
  • Schools as “scarcity-generating institutions.”
    Three metaphorial interpretations:
    Teacher is Lucy, students are the candy
    Students are Lucy, standards are the candy
    We as adults are Lucy, candy is information/life and scene is how we re struggling to cope with all of it.

    This is AP coursework

  • Take Mr. Shain’s alma mater, Princeton, whose freshman class this year is 37 percent minority students, 17 percent athletes, 13 percent legacies and 11 percent international students. “Among very, very good schools, a huge percentage of the class is not in play on academic grounds,” he says. “How much can you improve the class when you’re only working with half or less?” http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/07/education/edlife/07HOOVER-t.html?_r=3&adxnnl=1&partner=rss&emc=rss&pagewanted=6&adxnnlx=1288972850-lKQWcBB5WXwRrzW2+u79QA “Out of more than 50 people I hired in the last 6 years, I didn't hire one single person because of their university education … In fact from my experience good grades at a university generally tend to be more of a negative indicator than a positive....Top students were typically people who created massive social friction in my teams, under delivered and were very slow in adapting to change...”
    http://bjoernlasse.posterous.com/the-illusion-of-disrupting-vs-repairing-the-e
  • Learning must be:
    ongoing
    cooperative
    distributed
    diverse
    autonomous
    personally significant
    “I store my learning in my friends” We need to “demystify” education-- make it relevant, meaningful, not abstract “well-roundedness.” Find out what energizes you-- even if not talented, it could have a transferable element to another domain (editing, rearranging closets- J. Fox)
  • http://www.evaluationcanada.ca/distribution/20090601_quinn_patton_michael_a.pdf;

    Simple: follow a recipe
    Complicated: build a rocket
    Complex: Raise a child
  • Acknowledges complexity
    As Richard Rothstein reminds us, all school-related variables combined can explain only about one-third of the variation in student achievement; most is due to non-school factors. Still, even to the extent that the quality of teaching does matter, Futernick argues that "variations in teaching performance flow largely from variables that have little to do with the qualities of teachers themselves." Lousy classrooms are more likely due to "poorly functioning systems than [to] individual [teachers'] shortcomings.... There is simply no shortcut to helping educators "cultivate an active intelligence that allows them to negotiate principles, practices, students' needs, and the ever-changing classroom and school environment." In short, says Wilson (in a sentence that ought to be emailed to every administrator and consultant in the country), "Good teaching doesn't rest on specific practices, but on how well the educator actively thinks through hundreds of decisions that no program can script." To try to mandate specific practices -- and Wilson offers some disconcerting examples relating to "literacy systems" -- not only doesn't help teachers to become more accomplished, flexible thinkers; it gets in the way." Alfie Kohn http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alfie-kohn/operation-discourage-brig_b_777148.html

    DeborahMersino
      
    What's interesting to note about Type 6 support is that it involves removing time/space restrictions at school. #gtchat
  • Acknowledges complexity
    As Richard Rothstein reminds us, all school-related variables combined can explain only about one-third of the variation in student achievement; most is due to non-school factors. Still, even to the extent that the quality of teaching does matter, Futernick argues that "variations in teaching performance flow largely from variables that have little to do with the qualities of teachers themselves." Lousy classrooms are more likely due to "poorly functioning systems than [to] individual [teachers'] shortcomings.... There is simply no shortcut to helping educators "cultivate an active intelligence that allows them to negotiate principles, practices, students' needs, and the ever-changing classroom and school environment." In short, says Wilson (in a sentence that ought to be emailed to every administrator and consultant in the country), "Good teaching doesn't rest on specific practices, but on how well the educator actively thinks through hundreds of decisions that no program can script." To try to mandate specific practices -- and Wilson offers some disconcerting examples relating to "literacy systems" -- not only doesn't help teachers to become more accomplished, flexible thinkers; it gets in the way." Alfie Kohn http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alfie-kohn/operation-discourage-brig_b_777148.html

    DeborahMersino
      
    What's interesting to note about Type 6 support is that it involves removing time/space restrictions at school. #gtchat
  • Since the fifteenth century, knowledge conceptualized as a straight-line kind of thing. The invention of curriculum. Ramus (ramifications).

    When is content emphasis appropriate? 1. As a stepping stone based on learner’s own assessment of need. 2. As a way to get “coverage” done quickly. Either way, a lot less of it needs to be done, and if you follow even the most conservative argument, gifted kids can get it done much faster-- why drag it out.


  • Not just unidirection storytelling, but collaborative and interactive
    gsiemens
      At the end of the “course” or event, the connections remain-- maybe weaker or abandoned, but more than before or out of traditional system.-- Diego’s updates says
    PLENK: 1540, CCK08: 2300, CCK09: 1200 (I think), Edfutures: 750 (capped)
    about 13 hours ago via TweetDeck

  • http://www.ingeniosus.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/PROFILES-BEST-REVISED-MATRIX-2010.pdf

  • We won’t be able to imagine how things will change in education-- we can only educate for adaptability. Difficulty is that we are current modeling inflexibility.
    Online learning (schools without walls)
    Peer to peer (P2P) learning
    Un-courses and un-conferences
    Decentralization
    Alternative accreditation systems
    Personal learning environments and networks (PLE/PLN)
  • Clive Shepard's lists for each of the four types of learning (formal, non-formal, on-demand, and experiential) describes the use of blogs as "learning journals." (Special shout-out to Stephen and OLdaily for the link).
    Clive Shepherd http://clive-shepherd.blogspot.com/2010/09/four-roles-for-social-media-in.html

    eduinnovation
      
    RT @StephanieDaul Sounds like something I've often said: formal learning is more about content and informal is more about context. #dl10
    about 1 hour ago via TweetDeck
    Mistaken idea that people learn like we teach
    While we may have had this insight fourteen years ago, what we didn’t yet have in clear focus was the mechanism by which this shift in power from institutions to individuals would take place. That mechanism is pull.
    From: http://edgeperspectives.typepad.com/edge_perspectives/2010/04/the-power-of-pull-has-finally-arrived.html Pull allows each of us to find and access people and resources when we need them, while attracting to us the people and resources that are relevant and valuable, even if we were not even aware before that they existed. Finally, in a world of mounting pressure and unforeseen opportunities, pull gives us the ability to draw from within ourselves the insight and performance required to more effectively achieve our potential.
    The power of pull puts each of us, individually and together, in a position to collaborate in a complete re-imagination of our biggest private-and public-sector institutions, one that may eventually remake society as a whole.
  • Cathy Davidson and David Goldberg’s recent 82 page white paper, The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age Davidson and Goldberg “Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age.” The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning.MIT Press, 2009. http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/chapters/Future_of_Learning.pdf
    Self-Learning
    Horizontal Structures
    From Presumed Authority to Collective Credibility
    A De-Centered Pedagogy
    Networked Learning
    Open Source Education
    Learning as Connectivity and Interactivity
    Lifelong Learning
    Learning Institutions as Mobilizing Networks
    Flexible Scalability and Simulation


  • Quantity through increased production made mediation impractical. Technology of the car gave people the capacity to deal with quantity on their own.

    a concept patented by Saunders in 1917, although the Gerrard brothers (the founders of the Alpha Beta grocery market chain) were already using the concept in their stores in Pomona, California, prior to 1915.[3] Because customers could choose their products directly, packaging and brand recognition became very important. Other grocers soon adopted the self-service format. The concept of the "self-serving store" was patented by Saunders in 1917. Customers at Piggly Wiggly entered the store through a turnstile and walked through four aisles to view the store’s 605 items sold in packages and organized into departments. The customers selected merchandise as they continued through the maze to the cashier.

    Created a host of other necessities-- including brand marketing, cashier, shopping carts, etc. Changed the nature of shopping-- can carry lots around with new technol of the car. Are we giving our gifted learers the chance to be excellent shoppers? Photos: Patrick Charles, huggingthecoast and roadsidepictures on Flickr
  • I’ve been doing this for about five year, and in that time there has been an explosion of the self-service learning opportunities. These are some of the most recent, but only the tip of the iceberg.

    Brings idea of “professional learning communities”, etc. into question
    New is a society in which “authority is determined by knowledge and function.” - heterarchy instead of hierarchy. High Ed reconcevied: Geography of change

    Are we, as adults, able to model high-qulaity, self-service learning?

    Brigs the question of legitimacy. Well, I’m the example. You don’t know who I am, aside from my blurb. i don’t have the same credentials as many of you in teh room. And so this raises the question of how many people are doing, or know to do , what I do while in these self-service learning communities. Have I been Googled? Did anyone look for my blog or Towtter stream? Is anyone discussing what I am saying in a back channel or sharing this infromation with others who are not in teh room in real time?

    Now, my mention of these tech tools brings us to the next emerging issue.

    In a notable acknowledgment of the tail wagging the dog, several panelists alluded here to the possibility that if colleges don't change the way they do business, then students will change the way colleges do business.
    College leaders don't yet know how to credential the knowledge students are gaining on their own, but they may soon have to, said Mark David Milliron, deputy director for postsecondary improvement at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. We are not far from the day when a student, finding unsatisfactory reviews of a faculty member on ratemyprofessors.com, will choose to take a class through open courseware online and then ask his home institution to assess him, Milliron said. Colleges need to prepare for that reality, he said.
    While the concept of a self-educated citizenry circumventing the traditional system of higher education may have sounded far-fetched a decade ago, the fact that the likes of Spilde gave it more than lip service marks something of a shift. Indeed, there was more than a subtle suggestion across hours of sessions Monday that colleges are in for a new world, like it or not, where they may not be the winners. The Rise of the 'Edupunk' http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/11/05/cref

  • Learning from a single source may be considered invalid and out of dat by peers adn empoyers. So,, you went to Harvard? Is that all?
  • Learning from a single source may be considered invalid and out of dat by peers adn empoyers. So,, you went to Harvard? Is that all?
  • Learning from a single source may be considered invalid and out of dat by peers adn empoyers. So,, you went to Harvard? Is that all?
  • Learning from a single source may be considered invalid and out of dat by peers adn empoyers. So,, you went to Harvard? Is that all?

  • Move from consumers of education to creators of learning opportunities and environments
    “Cognitive surplus”
    Maker culture
    bricolage/tinkering
    (constructivism/constructionism)
    Connective learning
    Huge shift for anxious parents
    The counterpart to technological determinisim. PLAY

    John Seely Brown- Reimagining Dewey http://ht.ly/1XF1Z Casual tinkering, deep tinkering

    wiliam Doll uses the terms science, story and spirit.

    Cognitive suprplus- Shirky: spare brain power and the tools to share and connect it


    Decrease in Fluency after 1990: Fluency scores (quantity of the ideas: ability to produce a number of ideas) decreased by 4.68% from 1990 to 1998 and by 7.00% from 1990 to 2008.
    Decrease in Originality after 1990: Originality scores (quality of the ideas: ability to produce a number of statistically infrequent ideas that shows how unique and unusual the ideas are) decreased by 3.74% from 1990 to 1998 and remained static from 1998 to 2008. Originality scores have actually significantly decreased, but the decrease has been deflated through the use of outdated scoring lists.
    Decrease in Creative Strengths after 1990: Creative Strengths scores (creative personality traits, including being emotionally expressive, energetic, talkative or verbally expressive, humorous, imaginative, unconventional, lively or passionate, perceptive, connecting seemingly irrelevant things together, synthesizing, and seeing things from a different angle) decreased by 3.16% from 1990 to 1998 and by 5.75% from 1990 to 2008.
    Decrease in Elaboration after 1984: Elaboration scores (ability to develop and elaborate upon ideas and detailed and reflective thinking and motivation to be creative) decreased more than other subscales of the TTCT. Elaboration scores decreased by 19.41% from 1984 to 1990, by 24.62% from 1984 to 1998, and by 36.80% from 1984 to 2008.
    Decrease in Abstractness of Titles after 1998: Titles scores (ability to produce the thinking processes of synthesis and organization, to capture the essence of the information involved, and to know what is important) increased until 1998, but decreased by 7.41% from 1998 to 2008.
    Decrease in Resistance to Premature Closure after 1998: Closure scores (intellectual curiosity and open-mindedness) decreased from 1984 to 1990, increased from 1990 to 1998, and decreased by 1.84% from 1998 to 2008.
    http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2010/10/the-decline-of-creativity-in-the-united-states-5-questions-for-educational-psychologist-kyung-hee-kim
  • Might not find traditional learning environments challenging or appropriate
    Benefit from opportunities to interact with other high achievers in their areas of strength
    Are often already “out of the box” thinkers
    Might never reach their potential without “radical” alternatives

    (autonomy, belongingness, goal orientation academic press, engagement and hope). Hope is measured with a hope index.“Hope” reflects an individual’s self perception regarding their ability to clearly conceptualize their goals, develop the specific strategies to reach those goals and initiate and sustain activity based upon those strategies.
    Hope data matched with their academic achievement scores can provide a detailed picture of the school environment and its effects on student performance. http://www.hopesurvey.org/about-the-hope-survey

    http://www.educationinnovating.org/2010/11/guest-post-how-does-school-foster-hopeThis concept of hope is common sense, yet most schools do not understand how they can produce hopeful students. In fact for a majority of students working their way through the a conventional school system, I would argue and data we have would suggest that their overall hope disposition decreases with the more time spent in school. Why would anyone stay in a place where their dreams, questions, and hope are called into question and disparaged?...First, hope is built when you give students choice and autonomy. At NWPHS, project based learning gives students real choice while they meet Minnesota graduation standards. We track their learning with a sophisticated project management tool called Project Foundry.
    Second, we focus on building positive relationships with youth. We do this through intensive field studies, advisories, and service learning.
    Third, we have faith that students will learn when you help them develop short and long-range goals through the use of continual learning plans and student run conferences which include the student, their advisor and at least one parent. These conferences last 30-45 minutes, and the student leads the discussion on their progress using their continual learning plan as the guide.

    http://www.educationinnovating.org/2010/09/hope-survey-allows-schools-to-recognize-and-follow-student-motivationYet research shows engagement and motivation decreases as students progress through secondary school. Searching for an explanation, researchers have found through the Hope Survey that school environment—educators’ support, or lack thereof, for students’ autonomy, sense of belonging, and their pursuit of goals—affects motivation.
  • futureofedu
    Personalization
    Personal learning
    Motivation
    Environment (liberating structures)
    Goals and outcomes
    Trust
    how do schools or supportive organizations become liberating structures? http://socialinvention.net/liberatingstructures.aspx
    Assigned homework largely a measure of compliance, not understanding

    Are the strategies you are using to teach students leading them to be self-managers?
    about 1 hour ago via TweetDeck
    Retweeted by ChristianLong
    Trust of student and trust in teachers-- standardization expresses distrust of both... and maybe of parents, too.
  • “ Learners, for their part, have to be prepared to exercise autonomy, responsibility, ownership, self-direction and reflection.” 22Keith Morrison

    Are the New Millennium Learners Making the Grade? makes the point that computer use amplifies a student’s academic skills and competencies, all of which are closely related to the student’s economic, social and cultural background. And therein lie the origins of the second digital divide. Policymakers must emphasise the role of schools in bridging this divide. The in-school student-to-computer ratio in the OECD area, now an average of 5 to 1, must be improved, and teachers must be trained to provide guidance in how to use information and communication technologies critically and responsibly. No student should leave compulsory education before mastering at least some of these skills. http://www.oecdobserver.org/news/fullstory.php/aid/3288/A_new_digital_divide_.html
    Pull, not push
    RSS feeds
    “Following”
    “Legitimate peripheral participation”
    Mash-ups
    Sharing as appropriate
    Serendipitous learning (the “pedagogy of propinquity”)
    eduinnovation
      
    "Google is a cross between a start-up and graduate school." Peter Norvig....I like that idea!
    about 1 hour ago via TweetDeck
  • March into the unknown.
    Modeling
    Demonstrating
    Autonomy
    Mastery
    Purpose
    Responsibility
    Ownership
    Self-direction (personal challenge, curiosity)
    Reflection (personal insight)
    Connection
    Why do you think things “have to” be this way?
    Even if the people “out there” aren’t doing what you’d like for your kids, don’t underestimate your own power. Above all, be realistic about what others can make happen, but don’t externalize blame for it not happening.
  • Check your ego at the door
    Is what you are doing contributing to independence and connection. Must be able to operate independently in a non-networked hierarchy. constant insistence on approval from authority figure undermines this.
    Is the conversation too small? Or too big?
    Learn something new. Everyday.
    Turn everything off. Everyday.
    Offer non-graded learning options.
    Offer non-defined learning options.
    Discuss choices at their core, not at superficial levels
    Rules for new storymaking
    Cut everyone some slack
    Welcome uncommon genres and tellers
    Learn together
    “Good” over “best”
    It’s a marathon, not a sprint
    “No whining”
  • Check your ego at the door
    Is what you are doing contributing to independence and connection. Must be able to operate independently in a non-networked hierarchy. constant insistence on approval from authority figure undermines this.
    Is the conversation too small? Or too big?
    Learn something new. Everyday.
    Turn everything off. Everyday.
    Offer non-graded learning options.
    Offer non-defined learning options.
    Discuss choices at their core, not at superficial levels
    Rules for new storymaking
    Cut everyone some slack
    Welcome uncommon genres and tellers
    Learn together
    “Good” over “best”
    It’s a marathon, not a sprint
    “No whining”
  • Check your ego at the door
    Is what you are doing contributing to independence and connection. Must be able to operate independently in a non-networked hierarchy. constant insistence on approval from authority figure undermines this.
    Is the conversation too small? Or too big?
    Learn something new. Everyday.
    Turn everything off. Everyday.
    Offer non-graded learning options.
    Offer non-defined learning options.
    Discuss choices at their core, not at superficial levels
    Rules for new storymaking
    Cut everyone some slack
    Welcome uncommon genres and tellers
    Learn together
    “Good” over “best”
    It’s a marathon, not a sprint
    “No whining”
  • Check your ego at the door
    Is what you are doing contributing to independence and connection. Must be able to operate independently in a non-networked hierarchy. constant insistence on approval from authority figure undermines this.
    Is the conversation too small? Or too big?
    Learn something new. Everyday.
    Turn everything off. Everyday.
    Offer non-graded learning options.
    Offer non-defined learning options.
    Discuss choices at their core, not at superficial levels
    Rules for new storymaking
    Cut everyone some slack
    Welcome uncommon genres and tellers
    Learn together
    “Good” over “best”
    It’s a marathon, not a sprint
    “No whining”
  • Check your ego at the door
    Is what you are doing contributing to independence and connection. Must be able to operate independently in a non-networked hierarchy. constant insistence on approval from authority figure undermines this.
    Is the conversation too small? Or too big?
    Learn something new. Everyday.
    Turn everything off. Everyday.
    Offer non-graded learning options.
    Offer non-defined learning options.
    Discuss choices at their core, not at superficial levels
    Rules for new storymaking
    Cut everyone some slack
    Welcome uncommon genres and tellers
    Learn together
    “Good” over “best”
    It’s a marathon, not a sprint
    “No whining”
  • Check your ego at the door
    Is what you are doing contributing to independence and connection. Must be able to operate independently in a non-networked hierarchy. constant insistence on approval from authority figure undermines this.
    Is the conversation too small? Or too big?
    Learn something new. Everyday.
    Turn everything off. Everyday.
    Offer non-graded learning options.
    Offer non-defined learning options.
    Discuss choices at their core, not at superficial levels
    Rules for new storymaking
    Cut everyone some slack
    Welcome uncommon genres and tellers
    Learn together
    “Good” over “best”
    It’s a marathon, not a sprint
    “No whining”



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