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Connected autonomy and talent development

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Combining research on talent development, the development of expertise, and connectivist concepts such as complexity and learning networks, this presentation examines legacy assumptions about learning and suggests that new understandings might change our perceptions of what it means to be a "high ability learner."

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Connected autonomy and talent development

  1. 1. New
stories
for
learning
 
 Connected
autonomy
and
talent
developmentCarmen
Tschofen Minnesota
Educators
of
the
tschofen@email.com Gifted
and
Talented
slideshare: February
7,
2011
  2. 2. A
travel
story
  3. 3. A
family
story
  4. 4. A
family
story ‣School
choice ‣Alternative
learning ‣Dual
enrollment ‣Supplemental
enrollment ‣Community
schooling ‣Exchange
programs ‣Homeschooling ‣Unschooling
  5. 5. A
learning
story
  6. 6. A
learning
story Gifted
models ‣Pull
out
model ‣Push
in
model ‣Cluster
grouping ‣Special
classes ‣School‐wide
 enrichment ‣Acceleration/ Compacting ‣Full
time
grouping
  7. 7. The
stories
we
create:
 The
Overton
Window S.O.P Outdated Optimal Outrageous ~Mackinac Center for Public Policy
  8. 8. The
stories
we
create:
 The
Overton
Window Obstacles Structural Conceptual S.O.P Worldview Psychological Neuroscience Optimal Outdated Optimal Outrageous ~Mackinac Center for Public Policy (modified C. Tschofen 10/10)
  9. 9. Stories
we
can’t
afford
  10. 10. Stories
we
can’t
afford Gifted
children
as...
  11. 11. Stories
we
can’t
afford Gifted
children
as... ‣Economic
engines
  12. 12. Stories
we
can’t
afford Gifted
children
as... ‣Economic
engines ‣Weapons
of
world
domination
  13. 13. Stories
we
can’t
afford Gifted
children
as... ‣Economic
engines ‣Weapons
of
world
domination ‣Academic
(testing)
wonders
  14. 14. Small,
old
stories
  15. 15. ‣Age
groups ‣School ‣Classrooms ‣Subjects ‣Grading ‣Sequences
and
diplomasSmall,
old
stories
  16. 16. Legacy
stories
  17. 17. Legacy
stories‣ In
2025:
4
year
college
=
$400,000
 (current
rate
of
increase)‣ Past
20
years:
tuition,
room,
board
and
fees,
 increased
at
a
rate
6
x
greater
than
the
 increase
in
the
average
earnings
of
college
 graduates.‣ Past
10
years:
college
graduates
earnings
 have
fallen.
Lataif,
Louis
E.
Universities
On
The
Brink

http://www.forbes.com/2011/02/01/college‐education‐bubble‐opinions‐contributors‐louis‐lataif_print.html

  18. 18. Legacy
stories 70%
of
high
school
graduates
 enroll
in
college

http://completionagenda.collegeboard.org/reports
  19. 19. Legacy
stories 70%
of
high
school
graduates
 enroll
in
college

 57
%

of
those
graduate
http://completionagenda.collegeboard.org/reports
  20. 20. Legacy
storiesCollege
students,
last
12
months:
 ‣30%
so
depressed
that
it
was
 difficult
to
function
 ‣49%
reported
overwhelming
 anxiety ‣10%
diagnosed
or
treated
for
 depression
(reported) ‣6%
seriously
considered
suicide American
College
Health
Association,
2008
  21. 21. Legacy
stories
  22. 22. Misleading
stories...
  23. 23. Misleading
stories..."The
digital
facelift"

 Clay
Shirky
  24. 24. Misleading
stories?Learning
technology
phases:‣ Textbook
on
a
screen‣ Enrichment/
“motivation”‣ Universe
in
a
box‣ Walled
“social”
garden‣ All‐seeing
eye/Technological
embrace
  25. 25. Leading
stories“...for
the
first
time
we
are
understanding
the
act
of
learning
as
a
response
to
changes
in
the
learning
environment,
rather
than
as
an
adaptation
to
a
predetermined
learning
system.”Bouchard,
Paul.
Network
Promises
and
Their
Implications,

January
2011http://rusc.uoc.edu/ojs/index.php/rusc/article/viewFile/v8n1‐bouchard/v8n1‐bouchard‐eng
  26. 26. Stories
of
connection
  27. 27. Stories
of
connection Connectivism
 ‣ Biological/Neurological ‣ Conceptual ‣ Social
  28. 28. Stories
of
connection Connectivism
 ‣ Biological/Neurological ‣ Conceptual ‣ Social ‣ (Physical:
 geographic/kinesthetic)
  29. 29. Stories
of
connection Connectivism
 ‣ Biological/Neurological ‣ Conceptual ‣ Social ‣ (Physical:
 geographic/kinesthetic) Stories
of
human
beings

  30. 30. Betts’
2010
revised
profiles
of
the
gifted
and
talented The
Successful The
Creative The
Underground The
At‐Risk The
Twice/Multi‐Exceptional The
Autonomous
Learner
  31. 31. “Passion‐based”Gifts
to
Talents... “To
lead
a
good
life”
  32. 32. Academics formal learning teachers Provisions Schools “Passion‐based”Gifts
to
Talents... “To
lead
a
good
life”
  33. 33. Mindset/Environment Gifts Expertness Academics formal learning teachers Provisions Tribes Networks Communities Schools “Passion‐based”Gifts
to
Talents...to
Tribes “To
lead
a
good
life”
  34. 34. Seth
Godin
on
the
tribes
we
lead
http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead.html

  35. 35. Seth
Godin
on
the
tribes
we
lead
http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead.html

  36. 36. Seth
Godin
on
the
tribes
we
lead
http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead.html

  37. 37. Seth
Godin
on
the
tribes
we
lead
http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead.html

  38. 38. Three
new
frames
of
understanding
  39. 39. Three
new
frames
of
understanding ‣ Information
Abundance ‣ Complexity ‣ Networks
  40. 40. Information
AbundanceAn
information
story 21st
Century
Fluency
Project:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ECAVxbfsfc
  41. 41. Information
AbundanceAn
information
story 10,000%
increase
in
information
in
6
years (digital
output) 500
Exabytes
=
500,000,000,000
Gigabytes In
books:
13
stacks
from
Earth
to
Pluto 21st
Century
Fluency
Project:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ECAVxbfsfc
  42. 42. Information
AbundanceAn
information
story Printing
it
would
deforest
the
planet...
 21st
Century
Fluency
Project:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ECAVxbfsfc
  43. 43. Information
AbundanceAn
information
story Printing
it
would
deforest
the
planet...
 ...12
times 21st
Century
Fluency
Project:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ECAVxbfsfc
  44. 44. Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
  45. 45. Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
 12
years
of
school
x
6
subjects
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
subject/year
  46. 46. Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
 12
years
of
school
x
6
subjects
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
subject/year+ 4
years
of
college
x
8
courses
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
course
  47. 47. Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
 12
years
of
school
x
6
subjects
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
subject/year+ 4
years
of
college
x
8
courses
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
course+ a
generous
100
books
for
research
papers
  48. 48. Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
 12
years
of
school
x
6
subjects
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
subject/year+ 4
years
of
college
x
8
courses
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
course+ a
generous
100
books
for
research
papers= 204
books
of
“knowledge”
  49. 49. Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
 12
years
of
school
x
6
subjects
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
subject/year+ 4
years
of
college
x
8
courses
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
course+ a
generous
100
books
for
research
papers= 204
books
of
“knowledge”Schools
as
“scarcity‐generating
institutions.”
  50. 50. Information
AbundanceAn
analogous
story http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wp3m1vg06Q
  51. 51. Information
AbundanceAn
analogous
story http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wp3m1vg06Q
  52. 52. Information
AbundanceBeyond
Just‐In‐Time
Learning
  53. 53. Information
AbundanceBeyond
Just‐In‐Time
Learning Many
educators...consider
the
principle
...
“Give
a
 man
a
fish
and
feed
him
for
a
day,
teach
a
man
to
 fish
and
feed
him
for
a
lifetime,”
to
represent
 the
height
of
educational
practice
today.
 Yet
it
is
hardly
cutting
edge.
 It
assumes
that
there
will
always
be
an
endless
 supply
of
fish
to
catch
and
that
the
techniques
for
 catching
them
will
last
a
lifetime.
And
therein
lies
 the
major
pitfall
of
the
twenty‐first
 century’s
teaching
model... 
Thomas
and
Brown,
A
New
Culture
of
Learning,
in
press
  54. 54. Information
AbundanceBeyond
Just‐In‐Time
Learning A
real
challenge
for
any
learning
theory
is
 to
actuate
known
knowledge
at
the
point
 of
application.
When
knowledge,
however,
 is
needed,
but
not
known,
the
ability
to
 [locate
and
integrate]
sources
to
meet
the
 requirements
becomes
a
vital
skill.
 George
Siemens
(2005)
  55. 55. Information
AbundanceBeyond
Just‐In‐Time
Learning ‣ Just
in
time
information ‣ Just
in
time
skill ‣ Just
in
time
connection
  56. 56. ComplexityZone
of
complexity Michael Quinn Patton, 2009
  57. 57. ComplexityZone
of
complexity Connective
and
 Inquiry‐based
 personal
learning and
personalized
 learning
Standardized
 Michael Quinn Patton, 2009 Modified: C. Tschofen 10/10content
and

 instruction
  58. 58. NetworksNetwork
Stories
  59. 59. NetworksNetwork
Stories
  60. 60. NetworksNetwork
Stories Core‐periphery
network http://www.monitorinstitute.com/
  61. 61. NetworksQualities
of
networked
learning ‣Text‣ Diversity ‣ Interactivity‣ Autonomy ‣ Openness





(Downes
2005)
  62. 62. Why
is
this
right
for
gifted
learners?
  63. 63. Why
is
this
right
for
gifted
learners? Gifted
students:
 Make
greater
use
of
learning
strategies
 [representing]
the
triadic
spectrum
for
self‐ regulating
learning,
managing: ‣ personal
processes
 ‣ behavior
 ‣ environment In
addition
to
peer
assistance,
gifted
students
 sought
significantly
more
adult
assistance
than
 did
regular
students. Student
Differences
in
Self‐Regulated
Learning:
Relating
Grade,
Sex,
and
Giftedness
to
Self‐Efficacy
and
Strategy
 Use
Zimmerman
and
Martinez‐Pons,
1990
  64. 64. Why
is
this
right
for
gifted
learners?“If
there
is
one
word
that
makes
creative
people
different
from
others,
it
is
the
word
complexity.
Instead
of
being
an
individual,
they
are
a
multitude.”
 Mihaly
Csikszentmihalyi

  65. 65. Why
is
this
right
for
gifted
learners? A
gifted
individual
is
a
quick
and
clever
thinker,
 who
is
able
to
deal
with
complex
matters;
an
 individual
who
is
autonomous,
curious
and
 passionate;
a
sensitive
and
emotionally
rich
 person,
who
is
living
intensely.

He
or
she
is
a
 person
who
enjoys
being
creative. Nauta
and
Ronner,
2009.
Giftedness
in
the
Work
Environment:
Backgrounds
and
Practical
Recommendations.
 http://www.sengifted.org/articles_adults/nauta_and_ronner_giftedness_in_the_work_environment.pdf
  66. 66. Why
this
right
for
talent
development?
  67. 67. Why
this
right
for
talent
development? 
"We
were
looking
for
exceptional
kids
and
what
we
found
were
 exceptional
conditions."

 Benjamin
Bloom
  68. 68. Why
this
right
for
talent
development? 
"We
were
looking
for
exceptional
kids
and
what
we
found
were
 exceptional
conditions."

 Benjamin
Bloom “Relative
experts
are
not
merely
better
at
doing
the
same
things
 that
others
do;
they
do
things
differently,
and
the
same
differences
 appear
in
various
domains."

 Bereiter
and
Scardamalia
(1986)
  69. 69. Why
this
right
for
talent
development? 
"We
were
looking
for
exceptional
kids
and
what
we
found
were
 exceptional
conditions."

 Benjamin
Bloom “Relative
experts
are
not
merely
better
at
doing
the
same
things
 that
others
do;
they
do
things
differently,
and
the
same
differences
 appear
in
various
domains."

 Bereiter
and
Scardamalia
(1986) “Expertise,
whether
demonstrated
in
such
everyday
feats
as
reading
 and
writing,
or
in
the
exceptional
accomplishments
of
artists,
 athletes,
and
scholars,
reflects
the
outcome
of
people’s
active
 engagement
in
the
world
around
them.”

 Cianciolo,
Sternberg,
and
Wagner

(2006)

  70. 70. What
makes
this
something
other
than
“a
parent
thing?”

  71. 71. What
makes
this
something
other
than
“a
parent
thing?”
 Your
goal
as
a
parent
is
to
foster
your
childs
 development,
not
to
impress
other
adults
 with
your
parenting
skills... The
most
significant
and
potentially
valuable
 influence
you
can
have
on
your
child
comes
 from
macromanagement
of
the
 environment,
not
from
micromanagement
 of
your
childs
behavior.
 Dr.
Peter
Gray,
Boston
College
  72. 72. What
makes
this
something
other
than
“a
parent
thing?”
 Interest
in
apprenticeship
has
been
 keen
in
the
K‐
12
reform
conversation...
 [whereby]
one
of
the
things
people
 notice...
is
how
utterly
teacher‐ dependent
American
education
has
 become.
Even
at
the
college
level...
We
 preach
the
goal
of
preparing
 independent
learners,
but
... Theodore
J.
Marchese
1998
 The
New
Conversations
About
Learning: Insights
From
Neuroscience
and
Anthropology,
 Cognitive
Science
and
Workplace
Studies

  73. 73. What
makes
this
something
other
than
“a
parent
thing?”
 Interest
in
apprenticeship
has
been
 Does
passion
in
fact
 keen
in
the
K‐
12
reform
conversation...
 re‐shape
our
brains
 [whereby]
one
of
the
things
people
 in
ways
that
make
it
 notice...
is
how
utterly
teacher‐ dependent
American
education
has
 harder
and
harder
 become.
Even
at
the
college
level...
We
 for
those
who
lack
 preach
the
goal
of
preparing
 this
passion
to
 independent
learners,
but
... compete
with
us? Theodore
J.
Marchese
1998
 Edge
Perspectives
with
John
Hagel:
 The
New
Conversations
About
Learning: Passion
and
Plasticity
‐
 Insights
From
Neuroscience
and
Anthropology,
 The
Neurobiology
of
Passion Cognitive
Science
and
Workplace
Studies

  74. 74. What
makes
this
something
other
than
“a
parent
thing?”
 Future
of
Learning,
MacArthur
Foundation,
2009: ‣ Self‐Learning ‣ Horizontal
Structures ‣ From
Presumed
Authority
to
Collective
Credibility ‣ A
De‐Centered
Pedagogy
 ‣ Networked
Learning ‣ Open
Source
Education ‣ Learning
as
Connectivity
and
Interactivity ‣ Lifelong
Learning ‣ Learning
Institutions
as
Mobilizing
Networks ‣ Flexible
Scalability
and
Simulation Davidson and Goldberg. Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. MIT Press, 2009. http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/chapters/Future_of_Learning.pdf
  75. 75. A
New
Culture
of
Learning
  76. 76. A
New
Culture
of
LearningCulture
of
teaching Culture
of
learning Culture
emerges
from
the
The
culture
is
the
environment environment,
grows
with
it Playful,
information‐rich
The
classroom
as
a
model surroundingsTeaching
us
about
the
world Learning
through
engagement
 within
the
worldStudents
must
prove
that
they
 All
embrace
what
we
don’t
know,
have
received
the
information
 come
up
with
better
questions
transferred;
that
they
quite
 about
it,
and
continue
asking...literally
“get
it.” 
Thomas
and
Brown,
A
New
Culture
of
Learning,
in
press
  77. 77. A
New
Culture
of
Learning? Barnett Berry, et al, January 2011
  78. 78. Connective
Educators ‣Technical
competence ‣Experimentation ‣Autonomy ‣Creation ‣Play ‣Capacity
for
complexity (George
Siemens,

2010)
  79. 79. Connective
Educators
  80. 80. Connective
Educators KnowledgeWorks
Learning
Agents
for
2020 ‣Learning
Fitness
Instructor ‣Personal
Education
Advisor ‣Community
Intelligence
Cartographer ‣Education
Sousveyor ‣Social
Capital
Platform
Developer ‣Learning
Partner ‣Learning
Journey
Mentor ‣Assessment
Designer http://www.futureofed.org/about/LearningAgents/
  81. 81. Connective
Educators Instead
of
focusing
on
teaching
as
an
 undifferentiated
whole...look
at
the
specific
needs
 of
students,
identifying
where
...
more
 appropriately
focused
services
would
offer
the
 needed
support... Downes,
Stephen.
The
Role
of
the
Educator
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/stephen‐downes/the‐role‐ of‐the‐educator_b_790937.html Agitator,
Alchemist,
Bureaucrat
,
Coach,
Collector,
Connector,
Convener,
 Coordinator,
Critic,
Curator,
Demonstrator,
Designer,
Evaluator,
Facilitator,
 Learner,
Lecturer,
Mentor,
Moderator,
Programmer,
Salesperson,
Sharer,
Tech
 Support
  82. 82. What
does
connected
autonomy
in
gifted
learners
look
like?

  83. 83. Professional Design Participation Crochet & Fleadh Instructi Amusem Craft & EngineerinClassical Violin Irish Fiddle Peter Music Online Maker Online Culture/ Global Schedulin CommunityInternatio nal Farmer’s Frog Market Mary Video Analysis & Circus Sharing Movement /Dance Ecologic Urban Gifted Uprigh alawarenes t Child Sponsore Environme d ntal performa Alternative Clowning School Traditiona / l School Social and conceptual learning network, S.T., age 14
  84. 84. Professional Design Participation Crochet & Fleadh Instructi Amusem Craft & EngineerinClassical Violin Irish Fiddle Peter Music Online Maker Online Culture/ Global Schedulin CommunityInternatio nal Frog Farmer’s Market Mary Video Analysis & Circus Sharing Movement /Dance Ecologic Urban Gifted Uprigh alawarenes t Child Sponsore Environme d ntal performa Alternative Clowning School Traditiona / l School Social and conceptual learning network, S.T., age 14
  85. 85. Professional Design Participation Crochet & Fleadh Instructi Amusem Craft & EngineerinClassical Violin Irish Fiddle Peter Music Online Maker Online Culture/ Global Schedulin CommunityInternatio nal Frog Farmer’s Market Mary Video Analysis & Circus Sharing Movement /Dance Ecologic Urban Gifted Uprigh alawarenes t Child Sponsore Environme d ntal performa Alternative Clowning School Traditiona / l School Social and conceptual learning network, S.T., age 14
  86. 86. Professional Design Participation Crochet & Fleadh Instructi Amusem Craft & EngineerinClassical Violin Irish Fiddle Peter Music Online Maker Online Culture/ Global Schedulin CommunityInternatio nal Frog Farmer’s Market Mary Video Analysis & Circus Sharing Movement /Dance Ecologic Urban Gifted Uprigh alawarenes t Child Sponsore Environme d ntal performa Alternative Clowning School Traditiona / l School Social and conceptual learning network, S.T., age 14
  87. 87. Professional Design Participation Crochet & Fleadh Instructi Amusem Craft & EngineerinClassical Violin Irish Fiddle Peter Music Online Maker Online Culture/ Global Schedulin CommunityInternatio nal Farmer’s Frog Market Mary Video Analysis & Circus Sharing Movement /Dance Ecologic Urban Gifted Uprigh alawarenes t Child Sponsore Environme d ntal Alternative Clowning School Traditiona / l School Social and conceptual learning network, S.T., age 14
  88. 88. The
big
picture
of
connected
autonomy

  89. 89. The
big
picture
of
connected
autonomy
 Learners
 understand
 how
they
are
 uniquely
 connected
and
 able
to
 contribute
in
 the
world.
  90. 90. Saying
“yes”
  91. 91. Connected learning for educators PLEK12 Personal Learning Environments for Inquiry in K-12 An Open Course for Educators Across the Globe COURSE DATE: February 7, 2011 through April 3, 2011 College of Education • University of Florida PLEK12 is a free, open course--there are no financial obligations to attend. http://bit.ly/hviMvl
  92. 92. Carmen
TschofenRobbinsdale,
Minnesotatschofen@email.comTwitter:
ctschoSkype:
ctschof

×