Preparing for the LL108 exam         Neil McLean        Mike Redmayne
Overview• Successful answers• Revision strategy• Logistics / the exam itself
Successful answers•   Have clear handwriting (worth 5%)•   Answer the question in the time available•   Are well organised...
Successful answers know the task (e.g. for 45 minute essays, most people write around 800 words, probably an introduction ...
Successful answers know the task (e.g. 45 minute problem question answers identify possible offences, match the definition...
Create a training regime (1)• Replicate the game    Know what the exam tasks are• Know how you win    Know what the examin...
Create a Training regime (2)•   Choose the topics you will answer for each exam – try to see    where there are areas you ...
Revision planning• 4 courses into 25 days = 3 sessions per day –  75 questions – enough?                    Mo Tue Wed Thu...
Revision planning• Weeks 1 – 4 – make answers to your  likely exam questions• Week 5 + summer term – practise  these, maki...
Study groups• Great idea – learn from each other, increase  motivation etc.• But…     • Agree on revising the same materia...
The Criminal Law Exam• 3 hours• Ten questions: you must answer four• In the exam you will be provided with a copy of the  ...
The Criminal Law Exam• 7 essay questions, 3 problem questions  (some essays may be either/or)• You do not have to answer a...
The Criminal Law Exam• Revision: look at past papers, but do  not take anything for granted (‘x always  comes up’ / ‘x alw...
The Criminal Law Exam• Essays: answer the question! (none of  the essays ask: ‘write all you know  about x’)• Refer to aut...
The Criminal Law Exam• Examiner’s reports on moodle. These  talk through the questions on the exam  for the last two years...
The Criminal Law Exam• The easiest way to do badly: leave  insufficient time for the final answer
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Laws revision slides

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Laws revision slides

  1. 1. Preparing for the LL108 exam Neil McLean Mike Redmayne
  2. 2. Overview• Successful answers• Revision strategy• Logistics / the exam itself
  3. 3. Successful answers• Have clear handwriting (worth 5%)• Answer the question in the time available• Are well organised / flow logically• Demonstrate the skills / techniques / knowledge of the course – E.g. Successful exam essays balance opinion with knowledge – Thesis – say what you think (intelligent + independent) – Justification – reasoning (informed by reading) – Support – use of evidence (case law, definitions, rulings)
  4. 4. Successful answers know the task (e.g. for 45 minute essays, most people write around 800 words, probably an introduction and 4 or 5 paragraphs and a conclusion. The introduction answers the question and outlines the argument in support of this answer, each paragraph begins with a clear statement that helps answer the question and combines reference to authorities, statutory material, and case law to justify and support the main idea of the paragraph in a detailed and convincing manner)
  5. 5. Successful answers know the task (e.g. 45 minute problem question answers identify possible offences, match the definition of the offence to the actions in the problem, consider whether actus reus / mens rea can be established, decide whether defences / omissions apply and argue for the liability of all relevant individuals in the problem scenario succinctly and in a coherent order. Good answers see the potential ambiguity of the scenario and how this relates to establishing liability. They argue on this basis, making use of statutory materials and case law to justify this argument.)
  6. 6. Create a training regime (1)• Replicate the game Know what the exam tasks are• Know how you win Know what the examiners want• Practice (essays) 1. Plan really good answers 2. Practice making plans in real time 3. Write out the answers in long hand
  7. 7. Create a Training regime (2)• Choose the topics you will answer for each exam – try to see where there are areas you can double up on• Collect a database of past exam paper questions on these topics – train yourself to be able to answer a new question on any of your topics• Divide the days you’ll be revising into sections and prepare plans of good answers to all of these questions – use repetition to learn the core content, e.g. references / cases
  8. 8. Revision planning• 4 courses into 25 days = 3 sessions per day – 75 questions – enough? Mo Tue Wed Thur Fri 28 29 30 31 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29 Check you can fit everything in, know when you’re doing what and think about linking related topics / doubling up across exams and about repeating topics regularly
  9. 9. Revision planning• Weeks 1 – 4 – make answers to your likely exam questions• Week 5 + summer term – practise these, making plans on the bus, writing a timed essay each day (25/4 – 13/5 = 15 essays)
  10. 10. Study groups• Great idea – learn from each other, increase motivation etc.• But… • Agree on revising the same material and arrive with work to compare • Don’t concentrate on the lecture notes, concentrate on answers • Don’t meet for long – 2 hours max. • Don’t do this with great friends / if you all speak the same language (other than English) • No beer
  11. 11. The Criminal Law Exam• 3 hours• Ten questions: you must answer four• In the exam you will be provided with a copy of the following statutory material: – Sexual Offences Act 2003 ss 1-4 and 74-79; Theft Act 1968 ss 1-12; Theft Act 1978 s 3; Fraud Act 2006 ss 1-16• You can use your own copy of Herring, Criminal Law Statutes. DO NOT write in them. – Underlining, highlighting and page tabs are permitted
  12. 12. The Criminal Law Exam• 7 essay questions, 3 problem questions (some essays may be either/or)• You do not have to answer a problem question…but the vast majority of people do. Avoiding problem questions = risky revision strategy. You don’t know which topics will come up as essay/problem
  13. 13. The Criminal Law Exam• Revision: look at past papers, but do not take anything for granted (‘x always comes up’ / ‘x always comes up as a problem question’)• Some topics especially important because they can easily be combined with other issues in a problem question, eg complicity, intoxication
  14. 14. The Criminal Law Exam• Essays: answer the question! (none of the essays ask: ‘write all you know about x’)• Refer to authorities where relevant• Either (a) Or (b) means Either (a) Or (b), not Both (a) and (b)
  15. 15. The Criminal Law Exam• Examiner’s reports on moodle. These talk through the questions on the exam for the last two years and give detailed advice, commenting on what students did well and badly.
  16. 16. The Criminal Law Exam• The easiest way to do badly: leave insufficient time for the final answer

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