Thomas C. Rust, Ph.D. Montana State University-Billings
Three Age Divisions   Youth (4-5)*  Junior (6-8)  Senior (9-12) *not eligible for national competition
Who May Enter? <ul><li>Individuals </li></ul>Groups of 2-5
CATEGORIES Performance (Individual and Group) Documentary (Individual and Group) Exhibit (Individual and Group) Web Site (...
Performance <ul><li>You’ve only got ten minutes, so don’t try to cover the history of civilization. </li></ul><ul><li>Move...
Costumes Historically Accurate <ul><li>If you use costumes, make sure they are accurate </li></ul>
Simple Props & Sets <ul><li>When it comes to sets and props, less is sometimes more. </li></ul>
Exhibits <ul><li>This is the largest category and therefore the hardest to place in  </li></ul><ul><li>Style and clever pr...
EXHIBITS
EXHIBITS
 
 
<ul><li>Computer programs have great special effects, don’t try to use every one </li></ul>Documentaries <ul><li>Go to the...
Web Sites
Historical Papers <ul><li>Make sure there are no mistakes (punctuation, grammar, spelling) to distract the judges </li></u...
Papers Aren’t Always “Papers” This Historical Paper entry about Lawrence of Arabia was done in comic book form and entered...
How Does My Project Get Judged?
Judges must follow the format of their judging sheets
Historical Accuracy  Analysis and Interpretation Historical Context  Shows Wide Research Research is Balanced 60%
Shows Wide Research <ul><li>Secondary Sources </li></ul><ul><li>General Reference Books </li></ul><ul><li>Encyclopedias </...
Shows Wide Research <ul><li>Primary Source Documents </li></ul><ul><li>Oral Histories  </li></ul><ul><li>Interviews with P...
Unbalanced Research The internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII was wrong Communism is immoral George Armstro...
Balanced Research The internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII violated the Bill of Rights  Communism addresse...
20% This Year’s Theme is “Innovations in History” Relating to a theme doesn’t mean just slipping it into your title This i...
20% Is it  clear ? Is it  well organized ? Can you  follow it without help ? Not to be swayed by  Glitz
Final Tips for Everyone Remember the judging criteria Get feedback from the professionals  and don’t be  afraid to change ...
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An introduction to National History Day for students in Montana

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  • There are three age divisions in the History competition: Youth = Grades 4-5 Junior = Grades 6-8 Senior = Grades 9-12 Idaho is one of the few states in the nation that has a Youth Division. As a result, students in grades 4-5 may advance from their regional contest to the Idaho State competition, but are not eligible to go on to the national competition in Washington, DC.
  • Students may compete individually or in groups of 2 - 5 students, depending on the category they choose.
  • At History Day, students show what they have learned by completing a project. They may enter in one of the following categories: Performance--individually or in group Documentary--individually or in group Exhibit--individually or in group Web Site--individually or in group Historical Paper--individually only Each of these categories will be discussed in more detail shortly.
  • Now, let&apos;s take a look at each CATEGORY. Do you like to get up in front of others and act? Do you have a great History Day topic that you&apos;ve found lots of information about, but you can&apos;t find many photos, maps, or other visuals? Then perhaps PERFORMANCE is the category you would like to enter. ELABORATION: 1) Once you&apos;ve researched your topic, write your script. Use this to tell the judges about your topic, but remember &amp;quot;You&apos;ve only got 10 minutes, so don&apos;t try to cover the history of civilization!&amp;quot; Fine-tune your topic so that you focus on one really important issue, event, or person, and its historical importance. 2) &amp;quot;Move around.&amp;quot; Don&apos;t stand there like a stick and just talk. Movement, appropriate actions, posture, and voice inflections can help make a topic exciting. 3) &amp;quot;Just because you are a thespian (actor) doesn&apos;t mean you get to ignore the judging criteria.&amp;quot; Analysis and interpretation is often difficult to show in a performance, but the judges will be looking for it Check over the rules carefully to see what you will be evaluated on.
  • &amp;quot;If you use costumes, make sure they are accurate.&amp;quot; Use the costumes to help tell the historical facts. In performances, make sure your costumes are appropriate to your topic and the time period. Lewis &amp; Clark did not wear cut-off jeans, T-shirts and baseball caps. The Goodwill Store, your Grandmother&apos;s closet, and school drama departments are good resources for costuming.
  • &amp;quot;When it comes to sets and props, less is sometimes more.&amp;quot; Keep props and background sets as simple and portable as possible. YOU have to set them up. Your parents can&apos;t help! You will have five minutes to set up before your ten-minute performance; then you will have five minutes to tear your set down before or after your interview with the judges.
  • When you go to a museum and look around, you will see many EXHIBITS. ELABORATION: 1) &amp;quot;Exhibits is the largest category and therefore the hardest to place in.&amp;quot; 2) &amp;quot;Organize, organize, organize&amp;quot;--a good exhibit is easy to follow because it &amp;quot;flows&amp;quot; in a logical manner. The viewer doesn&apos;t have to jump around and wonder how information relates to the topic. 3) An Exhibit is a visual project. Consider everything that might make an impact. a) Text to photo ratio--every &amp;quot;picture&amp;quot; should have a good easy-to-read caption that ties it to the overall theme. But be careful---too many pictures and captions can make a project difficult to follow and make it look cluttered. b) Picture resolution--make sure all the graphics on your project are clear and not &amp;quot;pixelated&amp;quot; or fuzzy. c) Choose colors, textures, etc. carefully to help the viewer focus on your topic. Lewis and Clark didn&apos;t have neon orange or hot pink. Therefore, these might not be good color choices for matting photos and captions 4) &amp;quot;Style and clever presentation is a plus, but DON&apos;T RELY ON GLITZ.&amp;quot; Remember, a project that looks gorgeous but lacks historical quality won&apos;t win.
  • Here&apos;s some examples of EXHIBITS. Notice the following: 1) Titles, pictures, captions are neatly matted (framed with one or more color layers) 2) Font size in captions &amp; titles is large and clear for easy reading 3) Titles help organize important pictures/data 4) Exhibitor&apos;s may use a dioramas to help tell about the topic 5) The outside of some display units are also used for information 6) Some of these projects look expensive, but remember: Exhibits DO NOT need to cost a lot. The quality and depth of the research is more important than the cost of the display. The most expensive-to-assemble exhibits often do not win.....they&apos;re all &amp;quot;glitz&amp;quot; but no substance.
  • Exhibit example #2 Exhibits can be any shape, as long as they follow size requirements. Sometimes exhibits rotate, allowing information to be displayed on all sides; some exhibits make clever use of hinged doors or panels that open allowing for more space to display information. But regardless of what shape is used, information should be neatly displayed and well organized so that it is easy to follow.
  • If you know how to use and have access to audiovisual equipment, DOCUMENTARIES might be a fun category to show your research. to produce a documentary, you must have access to equipment and be able to operate it. ELABORATION: 1) A documentary should reflect your ability to use AV equipment to communicate your topic&apos;s significance, much as professional documentaries do. &amp;quot;Go to the library and check out some award winning documentaries and study them.&amp;quot; 2) &amp;quot;Keep your imagery consistent and relavant.&amp;quot; Make sure all the content of your video is focusing on your topic. Try to keep your visuals factual and historical (Example: If you are doing a documentary on a WWII topic, use real footage &amp; pictures from the event---don&apos;t mix cartoons with pictures from the Holocaust) 3) &amp;quot;Computer programs have great special effects, but don&apos;t try to use every one.&amp;quot; Special effects, such as &amp;quot;sounds,&amp;quot; should be appropriate for your topic, not distract from it. This also holds true for transitions between slides. It is usually best to leave the &amp;quot;bells and whistles&amp;quot; out of historical documentaries. 4) Video editing equipment effects can help you &amp;quot;create an illusion of movement&amp;quot; and can be very effective. This can be done by panning across a scene or photo, or by focusing a tight shot on a face and then pulling out to reveal the rest of the picture. 5) Be careful....&amp;quot;Poor sound quality can sink your project.&amp;quot; In this category, all voicing must be pre-recorded---you are not allowed to speak as judges are viewing your documentary. Make sure your recordings are clear, easy to understand, and &amp;quot;scratch-free.&amp;quot; 6) NOTE: You may be in your Documentary as the narrator or commentator, but it is NOT appropriate to videotape you or someone else doing a play about your topic.
  • Web Sites ELABORATION: a) This is a brand new category that will be available at the National History Day level beginning in 2008. b) Individuals or groups may enter this category. If you are computer savvy and enjoy building interactive webpages, this might be the category for you. c) Read and follow the Web Site Rules carefully. d) Until the category gets more firmly established (TEACHERS: Check nationalhistoryday.org for current status), all Web Sites will be judged against each other, regardless of whether an individual or group created them.
  • An Individual may enter the HISTORICAL PAPER category. If you like to write, this may be a great category for you. ELABORATION: 1) It is very important to edit what you have written to &amp;quot;make sure there are no mistakes in punctuation, grammar, spelling, etc. that might distract the judges.&amp;quot; 2) &amp;quot;Wow them with your research.&amp;quot; Analyze and intepret the information you find in your research. How does this information relate to your topic? What do you think might have happened &amp;quot;if&amp;quot;..... 3) &amp;quot;Stay focused&amp;quot;--make sure all your information ties your topic to the annual theme and that it supports your thesis. 4) Make sure your paper is original and does not just rehash what someone else thought. &amp;quot;Original analysis and interpretation is the key&amp;quot; 5) &amp;quot;A paper isn&apos;t always a Paper.&amp;quot; Although most entries in this category are done in report style, in the past, students have written and illustrated comic books, or written their papers in the format of a newspaper. You can be creative, but all work must be your own and follow the rules for Historical Papers.
  • Here&apos;s a sample of a Historical Paper done in comic book format. ELABORATION: 1) Notice the neatness of the artwork and the text. This is professional quality 2) The work was done entirely by the student, is Historically Accurate, Original, Neat, and stays Focused.
  • So now that you&apos;ve got your finished project in the competition, what happens? Here comes the judges. Historians, teachers, and many other knowledgeable people will evaluate your project. Judging entries is a very difficult job. A team of judges will look at your project, read through your paperwork, and ask you questions about your research. Why a team? This makes the judging fairer and less biased. Consider this: 1) Think of a topic or subject you don&apos;t particularly like. 2) Think of a two colors you don&apos;t like together. Now, suppose you were asked to judge an exhibit on that subject, and the student had chosen those two colors to create the exhibit. By yourself, you might not give that student a very good score based on your own likes and dislikes. But if you are a part of a team of judges and can talk over your ideas and viewpoints with the others, you might end up seeing the quality of the student&apos;s research as very good, and that is most important.
  • The judges know the rules of each category, and they have special forms that help them judge each project as thoroughly and as fairly as possible. They will rate your entry in four areas. Let&apos;s look at each of the criteria.
  • 60% of your project total is for Historical Quality. Your project must: 1) Be Historically Accurate---it must be factual, not make-believe. 2) Show Analysis and Interpretation---how do the facts you found support your topic? 3) Be placed in Historical Context--what else was going on or happening at the same time in history? 4) Show Wide Research--what Primary and Secondary sources did you use? 5) Show Balanced Research--look at the Pro&apos;s and Con&apos;s of your topic What does all this mean?
  • Your project should show that you have done Wide Research. ELABORATION: The judges will look to see where you got your information from. You need to use a wide variety of Secondary and Primary sources. You need to use more than just the Internet. You should begin researching your topic by using Secondary Sources which provide the basic background about your topic. Secondary sources include General Reference Books such as your social studies text, and Encyclopedias. Biographies are secondary because they were written about another person&apos;s experiences. Interviews with people who did not witness the event are secondary.
  • Primary Source Documents are those written by people who lived through or witnessed the event. 1) Oral histories and Interviews with people who witnessed the event can provide first-hand information about your topic. 2) Diaries and letters written by someone who was involved in the event can provide rich insights into how people thought and reacted to an event. 3) Searching through government documents and archives might turn up military and court records, letters, etc. about your topic. 4) Visiting museums and Historical Sites can provide examples of artifacts and visula images of your topic that goes beyond reading about it. 5) Some topics (e.g. ancient history, classified military topics) have fewer available Primary Sources than others, but you need to find and use all that are available. If you can&apos;t find sufficient primary sources, you might need to consider a different topic. Remember, Secondary Sources provide the basic background about your topic, but they only give you a small peice of the story. Judges will look to see if you searched out the really important Primary Sources that bring your topic to life.
  • Your research needs to be Balanced. ELABORATION: A good History Day topic frequently has more than one side to it. One person may see an event as good, while another person may see the same event as bad. A good researcher looks at both sides of an issue, even if they may not agree with both sides. You need to research ALL the facts. It&apos;s OK to draw your own conclusions in the end, as long as you show Analysis and Interpretation in your project. EXAMPLE #1: You may think the internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII was wrong. However, the government thought it was necessary. As a researcher, you would need to find out what was going on at the time, why the government thought they needed to hold the Japanese people in camps such as the one in Minidoka County, what happened to the people in these camps, and what the end results were. Other debatable issues might be Communism, George Armstrong Custer, or Nuclear Energy
  • Your research needs to be Balanced. ELABORATION: A good History Day topic frequently has more than one side to it. One person may see an event as good, while another person may see the same event as bad. A good researcher looks at both sides of an issue, even if they may not agree with both sides. You need to research ALL the facts. It&apos;s OK to draw your own conclusions in the end, as long as you show Analysis and Interpretation in your project. EXAMPLE #1: You may think the internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII was wrong. However, the government thought it was necessary. As a researcher, you would need to find out what was going on at the time, why the government thought they needed to hold the Japanese people in camps such as the one in Minidoka County, what happened to the people in these camps, and what the end results were. Other debatable issues might be Communism, George Armstrong Custer, or Nuclear Energy
  • 20% of your project total will be for Relationship to the Theme. ELABORATION: 1) &amp;quot;This year&apos;s theme is _____________. (e.g = &amp;quot;Triumph &amp; Tragedy in History&amp;quot;) Although it is nice to be able to show both sides, students may choose to focus on one area only (tragedy or triumph). 2) &amp;quot;Relating your topic to the theme doesn&apos;t mean just slipping it into your title.&amp;quot; (For example, &amp;quot; Triumph and Tragedy: the Story of Babe Ruth&amp;quot;) The project must SHOW how this all fits together. (What was the &amp;quot;triumph&amp;quot; and/or &amp;quot;tragedy&amp;quot; Ruth faced, and how did it effect him? his family? baseball?) 3) &amp;quot;History Day is not a science fair or a current events forum, so be careful that you have some historic relevance.&amp;quot; Examples: Science = How the Automobile is Made History: The Automobile and Its Impact on Transportation Science = How to make an atomic bomb History = the History Behind the Manhattan Project Art/Literature = Painting by Picasso History = How Picasso Influenced the Cubist Movement Current Events = The Iraqi War History = The Iraqi War and It&apos;s Influence on Foreign Policy
  • Clarity of Presentation is worth 20% of the project evaluation. ELABORATION: 1) Is the presentation clear? It must make sense and be easy to understand. Both the project and the paperwork need to clearly relate your topic to the annual theme. 2) Is the project well organized? The judges should be able to easily follow the presentation from beginning to ending without wondering how facts relate to each other and what point you are trying to make. 3) Can the project be followed without help? If it is clear and well-organized, the answer will be &amp;quot;Yes.&amp;quot; 4) Finally, &amp;quot;Don&apos;t be Swayed by Glitz.&amp;quot; No special points are given for how &amp;quot;cool&amp;quot; or expensive your project looks. Some projects may look really fancy and cost a lot of money to make, but they contain little information about a topic, or they fail to show how the topic is related to the annual theme. You do want to have your project be as neat and attractive as you can make it. The appearance of your project should help you tell about your topic. Then, if the judges feel two projects are equally good in historical quality, they might be inclined to give a bonus point to the one with the neater appearance. But remember, it is the depth and quality of your research and how you relate the topic to the theme that is MOST important.
  • FINAL TIPS FOR EVERYONE: 1) Remember the judging criteria for your category. 2) Use the feedback from the judges to improve your projects, and don&apos;t be afraid to change things. If your entry makes it to the next level of competition, your Title and Category must remain the same, but everything else can be completely torn apart and improved on. Use the judges suggestions. 3) Don&apos;t give the judges a reason to mark you down. Follow the rules and do the very best you can in your research and development. 4) Remember, winning isn&apos;t everything. Yes, it&apos;s nice to go on, but learning about how to be a historical researcher is a life-long skill and makes everyone who does History Day a winner.
  • Nhd student intro

    1. 1. Thomas C. Rust, Ph.D. Montana State University-Billings
    2. 2. Three Age Divisions Youth (4-5)* Junior (6-8) Senior (9-12) *not eligible for national competition
    3. 3. Who May Enter? <ul><li>Individuals </li></ul>Groups of 2-5
    4. 4. CATEGORIES Performance (Individual and Group) Documentary (Individual and Group) Exhibit (Individual and Group) Web Site (Individual and Group) Historical Paper (Individual)
    5. 5. Performance <ul><li>You’ve only got ten minutes, so don’t try to cover the history of civilization. </li></ul><ul><li>Move around a bit-remember you are on stage </li></ul><ul><li>Just because you are a thespian, it doesn’t mean you get to ignore the judging criteria </li></ul>
    6. 6. Costumes Historically Accurate <ul><li>If you use costumes, make sure they are accurate </li></ul>
    7. 7. Simple Props & Sets <ul><li>When it comes to sets and props, less is sometimes more. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Exhibits <ul><li>This is the largest category and therefore the hardest to place in </li></ul><ul><li>Style and clever presentation is a plus, but DON’T RELY ON GLITZ </li></ul><ul><li>Organize, organize, organize </li></ul><ul><li>This is a visual project-- consider everything that might make an impact (text/to photo ratio, picture resolution, color, texture, etc) </li></ul>
    9. 9. EXHIBITS
    10. 10. EXHIBITS
    11. 13. <ul><li>Computer programs have great special effects, don’t try to use every one </li></ul>Documentaries <ul><li>Go to the library and check out some award winning documentaries and study them. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep your imagery consistent and relevant </li></ul><ul><li>You can create an illusion of movement </li></ul><ul><li>Poor sound quality can sink your project </li></ul><ul><li>Great Example on Youtube.com </li></ul><ul><li>Enter: History Day Harry Truman Atomic Bomb </li></ul>
    12. 14. Web Sites
    13. 15. Historical Papers <ul><li>Make sure there are no mistakes (punctuation, grammar, spelling) to distract the judges </li></ul><ul><li>Wow them with your research </li></ul><ul><li>Stay focused </li></ul><ul><li>Is your paper original or does it just rehash someone else’s viewpoint? Original analysis and interpretation is the key. </li></ul><ul><li>A paper isn’t always a paper </li></ul>
    14. 16. Papers Aren’t Always “Papers” This Historical Paper entry about Lawrence of Arabia was done in comic book form and entered in the Historical Paper category. All text and artwork was done by the student. Work is original , neat, and focused.
    15. 17. How Does My Project Get Judged?
    16. 18. Judges must follow the format of their judging sheets
    17. 19. Historical Accuracy Analysis and Interpretation Historical Context Shows Wide Research Research is Balanced 60%
    18. 20. Shows Wide Research <ul><li>Secondary Sources </li></ul><ul><li>General Reference Books </li></ul><ul><li>Encyclopedias </li></ul><ul><li>Biographies </li></ul><ul><li>Interviews with people who “do” history </li></ul>
    19. 21. Shows Wide Research <ul><li>Primary Source Documents </li></ul><ul><li>Oral Histories </li></ul><ul><li>Interviews with People Who Witnessed </li></ul><ul><li>the Event </li></ul><ul><li>Diaries & Autobiographies </li></ul><ul><li>Government Documents and Archived </li></ul><ul><li>Material </li></ul><ul><li>Museum Objects </li></ul><ul><li>Visiting a Historic Site </li></ul>
    20. 22. Unbalanced Research The internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII was wrong Communism is immoral George Armstrong Custer was a hero
    21. 23. Balanced Research The internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII violated the Bill of Rights Communism addressed the problems of the industrial revolution George Armstrong Custer had flashes of brilliance but also made many mistakes
    22. 24. 20% This Year’s Theme is “Innovations in History” Relating to a theme doesn’t mean just slipping it into your title This isn’t a science fair or a current events forum, so be careful that you have some historic relevance
    23. 25. 20% Is it clear ? Is it well organized ? Can you follow it without help ? Not to be swayed by Glitz
    24. 26. Final Tips for Everyone Remember the judging criteria Get feedback from the professionals and don’t be afraid to change things Don’t give the judges a reason to mark you down REMEMBER, Winning isn’t everything!

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