NIAA Meeting - Animal HealthEmergency ManagementCommitteeBarb MastersOFW LawApril 16, 2013
Emergency Preparedness andResponse• Food Defense• Foodborne Outbreaks and RegulatoryActions• Product RecallsImpact
Emergency Preparedness andResponse• Emergency/Response can protect animalhealth or public healthWithin USDA – APHIS has p...
Food Defense• Having measures in place to reduce thechances of someone intentionallycontaminating the food supply in order...
Food Defense• An attack on the food supply might be carried out byan extremist group, but it could be carried out by adisg...
Food Defense Plan• Inside and outside security,• Slaughter and processing,• Security,• Storage security,• Shipping and rec...
Food Defense Tools• FSIS has a “Risk Mitigation Risk Tool”“Look up” tool on website – This tool identifiessome possible c...
Food Defense Tools• Transportation Guidelineshttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/Transportation_Security• Disposal Guidelinesht...
Model Food Defense Plans• Official establishments are not required tohave food defense plans• In the event unintentionally...
Response to Findings• Most of the food safety practices already inplace apply equally to intentionalcontamination. If spe...
Foodborne Outbreaks andRegulatory Actions
Foodborne Outbreaks andRegulatory Actions• FSIS works with the public health community(CDC and states) when there are outb...
Foodborne Outbreaks andRegulatory Actions• FSIS looks at all the evidence and mayTake samplesConduct an in-depth investi...
Foodborne Outbreaks andRegulatory Actions• FSIS conducts pathogen testing in RTE products andSTEC testing in raw ground be...
Salmonella (raw)• FSIS conducts on-going performance standardtesting for Salmonella• However, if at any point FSIS determi...
Salmonella (raw)• With Salmonella, if multiple production daysimplicated, (i.e., on-going outbreak) FSISbeginning to look ...
Product Recalls
Product Recalls• A recall is a firm’s action to remove productfrom commerce (e.g., by manufacturers,• distributors, or imp...
Product Recalls• FSIS has procedures for requestingestablishment to conduct recallThese procedures would be followed in t...
Product Recalls• Can lead to national/international newsstories (depending on the nature and size ofthe recall)• Cameras a...
Impact of Recalls• Settlement Reached in hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS)Case Linked to Multistate Outbreak of E. coli O157...
Impact of Recalls“Blaming The Victim" Strategy Remains In Food Industrys Playbook New York Times story titled "Increasing...
Impact of RecallsCosts Improvements to facility (but timeline becomes someone else’s) Public perception of the brand Ne...
• CASE STUDYImpact of Recalls - Beyond the Plant
Public Perception – Beyond “The Plant”• Polls have shown consumer confidence in foodsafety declining (22.5% consumers conf...
The Tipping Point• Impacted those we loveOur pets (they can not make decisions for themselves - we fed them the contamina...
Strategies to Address Food SafetyConcerns• Legislation 2008 (10 food safety bills introduced in Congress)Food Safety Mod...
Things do improve….• 2009
Questions
Dr. Barb Masters - Emergency Preparedness and Response
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Dr. Barb Masters - Emergency Preparedness and Response

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Emergency Preparedness and Response - Dr. Barb Masters, Senior Policy Advisor, OFW Law, from the 2013 NIAA Merging Values and Technology conference, April 15-17, 2013, Louisville, KY, USA.

More presentations at http://www.trufflemedia.com/agmedia/conference/2013-niaa-merging-values-and-technology

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Dr. Barb Masters - Emergency Preparedness and Response

  1. 1. NIAA Meeting - Animal HealthEmergency ManagementCommitteeBarb MastersOFW LawApril 16, 2013
  2. 2. Emergency Preparedness andResponse• Food Defense• Foodborne Outbreaks and RegulatoryActions• Product RecallsImpact
  3. 3. Emergency Preparedness andResponse• Emergency/Response can protect animalhealth or public healthWithin USDA – APHIS has primary role foroversight in protecting animal healthFSIS has primary role for oversight in protectingpublic heath Work together in areas of emergency management(e.g., BSE, AI, etc.)
  4. 4. Food Defense• Having measures in place to reduce thechances of someone intentionallycontaminating the food supply in orderto kill or hurt people, disrupt oureconomy, or ruin your business.
  5. 5. Food Defense• An attack on the food supply might be carried out byan extremist group, but it could be carried out by adisgruntled employee or result from somethinghappening in a local area.• While an individual facility might not be directly atrisk, there is a high likelihood that if an attack whereto occur even at one establishment it would likelyimpact the entire industry, including internationaltrade.
  6. 6. Food Defense Plan• Inside and outside security,• Slaughter and processing,• Security,• Storage security,• Shipping and receiving security,• Water and ice security, and• Mail-handlingsecurityhttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/Securityguide.pdf
  7. 7. Food Defense Tools• FSIS has a “Risk Mitigation Risk Tool”“Look up” tool on website – This tool identifiessome possible countermeasures that companiescould implement, as part of a food defense plan,to better protect their business, employees, andcustomers.
  8. 8. Food Defense Tools• Transportation Guidelineshttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/Transportation_Security• Disposal Guidelineshttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/Disposal_Decontaminat• FDA toolshttp://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodDefense/ToolsEducatio
  9. 9. Model Food Defense Plans• Official establishments are not required tohave food defense plans• In the event unintentionally contaminated product isshipped from the establishment, swift removal of theadulterated materials from commerce would beessential to protect the public health.One mechanism for doing this would be a recall. By having an integrated recall-food defense plan, a firmcan implement either one, or both, of these measures at amoment’s notice, as needed.
  10. 10. Response to Findings• Most of the food safety practices already inplace apply equally to intentionalcontamination. If specific, credible threats are received, thenUSDA, in cooperation with other homelandsecurity agencies, would keep the public informedof measures to take.
  11. 11. Foodborne Outbreaks andRegulatory Actions
  12. 12. Foodborne Outbreaks andRegulatory Actions• FSIS works with the public health community(CDC and states) when there are outbreaksthat may involve FSIS regulated productsidentify the source of production and thedistribution, of the suspect meat, poultry, orprocessed egg productIdentify contributing factors to the outbreakRecommend actions or policies to prevent futureoccurrences
  13. 13. Foodborne Outbreaks andRegulatory Actions• FSIS looks at all the evidence and mayTake samplesConduct an in-depth investigation at the plantIssue a public health alertRecommend the plant conduct a product recallTake enforcement action at the establishment
  14. 14. Foodborne Outbreaks andRegulatory Actions• FSIS conducts pathogen testing in RTE products andSTEC testing in raw ground beef (and ground beefcomponents)Any finding and the products are consideredadulterated• When FSIS conducts pathogen testing in thesecommodities, establishments are expected to holdthe associated products pending test results• FSIS also conducts process control testingSalmonella performance standard testing
  15. 15. Salmonella (raw)• FSIS conducts on-going performance standardtesting for Salmonella• However, if at any point FSIS determines thereis specific product in commerce makingpeople sick… They WILL ask for a voluntaryrecall of that specific production of product.
  16. 16. Salmonella (raw)• With Salmonella, if multiple production daysimplicated, (i.e., on-going outbreak) FSISbeginning to look at pre-harvest as the sourceUnclear as to the break point if a recall isdetermined necessaryUnclear what steps a grower could take to “break”the source of “contamination” Model for animal disease outbreaks and recall
  17. 17. Product Recalls
  18. 18. Product Recalls• A recall is a firm’s action to remove productfrom commerce (e.g., by manufacturers,• distributors, or importers) to protect thepublic from consuming adulterated ormisbranded products.Intentional contaminationResponse to an outbreakShipment of adulterated product
  19. 19. Product Recalls• FSIS has procedures for requestingestablishment to conduct recallThese procedures would be followed in the eventan establishment has shipped adulteratedproduct, including intentional contaminationFSIS post product labels and information to assistconsumers in returning recalled product One could expect heightened media surrounding anintentionally contaminated product
  20. 20. Product Recalls• Can lead to national/international newsstories (depending on the nature and size ofthe recall)• Cameras and media may appear at the facility• Product labels appearing in the press and onthe major news outlets
  21. 21. Impact of Recalls• Settlement Reached in hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS)Case Linked to Multistate Outbreak of E. coli O157:H7Infections from November-December 2006• This outbreak was clearly linked to XXX lettuce served in YYYrestaurants in the northeastern United States. As ofDecember 14, 2006, Thursday, 71 persons with illnessassociated with the YYY restaurant outbreak have beenreported to CDC from 5 states….Litigation and settlement (extremely costly)
  22. 22. Impact of Recalls“Blaming The Victim" Strategy Remains In Food Industrys Playbook New York Times story titled "Increasingly, Food Companies CannotGuarantee Safety" by Michael Moss:• Mr. Moss looks at the aftermath of the pot pie salmonella outbreakof 2007 that sickened at least 15,000 Americans. The New YorkTimes reports this:• "So ZZZ — which sold more than 100 million pot pies last yearunder its popular WWW label — decided to make the consumerresponsible for the kill step. The “food safety” instructions and four-step diagram on the 69-cent pies offer this guidance: “Internaltemperature needs to reach 165° F as measured by a foodthermometer in several spots.”Bad Press – Tarnish the brand….
  23. 23. Impact of RecallsCosts Improvements to facility (but timeline becomes someone else’s) Public perception of the brand Negative publicity last years•Personnel Under a microscope Pressure to implement changes Often personnel changes implemented during a crises•Corporation Can use the information as a “lesson learned” Must support the team at the affected facility (often at the expense to otherfacilities May be asked to testify to the issues at the facilityBetter to prevent than react to a situation.
  24. 24. • CASE STUDYImpact of Recalls - Beyond the Plant
  25. 25. Public Perception – Beyond “The Plant”• Polls have shown consumer confidence in foodsafety declining (22.5% consumers confident in theirfood supply) [2007]Recalls of pet food involving illness and deaths of pets Melamine issues Recalls with national attention: peanuts, pistachios, peanut butter,peppers, beef, canned food, tomatoes, lettuceWhen the public loses confidence…
  26. 26. The Tipping Point• Impacted those we loveOur pets (they can not make decisions for themselves - we fed them the contaminant)• It was an intentional contamination• It was imported
  27. 27. Strategies to Address Food SafetyConcerns• Legislation 2008 (10 food safety bills introduced in Congress)Food Safety Modernization Act• RegulationPreventive Controls Includes Mandatory Recall and Food DefenseProduce SafetyHold and Test (FSIS)• Enforcement
  28. 28. Things do improve….• 2009
  29. 29. Questions

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