Halgin6e ppt ch13

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  • Substance , in this context, refers to a chemical that alters mood or behavior when smoked, injected, drunk, inhaled, or swallowed in pill form.
  • Intoxication: Behavior is maladaptive. Specific symptoms vary by substance. Alcohol intoxication: The individual can experience impaired judgment and attention, slurred speech, abnormal eye movements, slowed reflexes, unsteady gait, and changeable moods. Amphetamine intoxication: The person experiences accelerated bodily functioning as well as perspiration or chills. Tolerance: The extent to which the individual requires larger and larger amounts of a substance in order to achieve its desired effects, or the extent to which the individual feels less of its effects after using the same amount of the substance. Withdrawal symptoms: Also vary according to substance used. For example, nicotine withdrawal commonly includes anxiety and irritability. Substances with higher potency can lead to such severe physical and psychological symptoms that medical care is required.
  • Currently, substance abuse is defined as the maladaptive pattern of substance use occurring within a 12-month period that leads to significant impairment or distress evidence by (1) failure to meet obligations, (2) use of substances in physically hazardous situations, (3) legal problems, or (4) interpersonal problems. Substance dependence is a maladaptive pattern of use manifested by cognitive, behavioral, and physiological symptoms during a 12-month period and caused by continued use of substance
  • These estimates vary by gender, with one fifth of men having lifetime prevalence of alcohol abuse and/or dependence, twice the rate for women. Among women, there are variations in prevalence by age with highest rates reported for adolescent females.
  • In small amounts, alcohol has sedating effects leading to feelings of warmth, comfort, and relaxation. In larger amounts, it may lead drinkers to feel more outgoing, self-confident, and uninhibited. As drinking continues, alcohol’s effects as a central nervous system depressant become more apparent, as sleepiness, uncoordination, dysphoria, and irritability set in. Excessive drinking affects vital functions and can be fatal.
  • The mixture of alcohol with other drugs is potentiation , meaning the effect of two drugs taken together is greater than the effect of either alone. Combining alcohol, a depressant, with another depressant would exaggerate effects on the body and possibly would be fatal.
  • Tolerance: The more a person consumes over time, the more alcohol that person needs to achieve the desired impact.
  • Wernicke’s disease: An acute condition involving delirium, eye movement disturbances, movement and balance difficulties, deterioration of peripheral nerves to hands and feet. Cause of Wernicke’s: Thiamine (vitamin B) deficiency due to deleterious effects of alcohol on metabolism. Korsakoff’s syndrome: A permanent form of dementia associated with long-term alcohol use in which the individual develops retrograde and anterograde amnesia leading to an inability to remember recent events or learn new information.
  • Strong evidence from family histories and twin studies indicate a genetic basis for predispositions to alcohol dependence. Expectancy model: An approach to alcohol dependence that focuses on cognitive-behavioral and social learning perspectives. According to this view, people acquire the belief that alcohol will reduce stress; will make them feel more competent socially; physically, and sexually; and will give them feelings of pleasure. Abstinence violation effect: A sense of loss of control over one's behavior that has an overwhelming and demoralizing effect. Self-efficacy is eroded, initiating a downward spiral which eventually ends in renewed alcohol dependence.
  • Stimulants: Substances that have an activating effect on the nervous system. Amphetamines (“uppers”): Stimulants that cause a range of effects depending of the amount, method, and duration of use. Tolerance builds quickly. Crack cocaine: The inexpensive, crystallized form of street cocaine that is usually smoked. Compared with amphetamines, the stimulating effects of cocaine last a shorter time but are more intense. At higher dosages, psychotic symptoms may be experienced. Caffeine is also a psychoactive drug in that even a small amount can bring about slight improvements in mood, alertness, and clarity of thoughts. Greater amounts can produce anxiety and irritability. Even small amounts of caffeine can provoke panic attacks in individuals susceptible to them. Some people experience caffeine intoxication, caffeine-induced anxiety disorder, or caffeine-induced sleep disorder. Caffeine withdrawal symptoms include headache, fatigue, anxiety, nausea, irritability.
  • Marijuana is the most widely used illegal drug in the US. The active drug in it is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinal (THC) , which comes from the plant cannabis sativa . Hashish , containing a more potent form of THC, comes from the resins of the plant’s flowers. Most effects of cannabis intoxication are reversible, but, when marijuana is taken over long periods, abuse is likely to lead to dependence. Adverse effects on bodily function include nasal and respiratory problems, chronic sinusitis, bronchial constriction, breathing difficulty, and loss of lung capacity. Heavy users show cognitive deficits in attention, memory, and learning.
  • Hallucinogens: Psychoactive substances that cause abnormal perceptual experiences in the form of illusions or hallucinations, usually visual in nature. LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) was an inadvertent discovery originally used to mimic schizophrenia for research purposes. It induces hallucinogen intoxication symptoms such as dizziness, weakness, euphoria, and hallucinations. Psilocybin: Hallucinogenic mushrooms in low amounts produce relaxation and euphoria. PCP (phencyclidine, a.k.a. “angel dust”) has unpredictable effects. In low dosages, it acts as a depressant and produces effects similar to alcohol intoxication. Larger doses cause distorted perceptions of self and environment, sometimes aggressive and irrational behavior, and/or a temporary psychotic state with symptoms similar to schizophrenia.
  • Opioids include natural derivatives from the opium poppy or synthetic drugs affecting the same portions of the nervous system. Heroin is the most abused opioid. Methadone is prescribed to heroin-dependent individuals to help them get control over their addiction with a safer and more controlled reaction. It is neither intoxicating nor sedating.
  • Intoxication from sedatives and hypnotics involves maladaptive behavioral or psychological changes, such as inappropriate sexual or aggressive behavior, unstable mood, impaired judgment, and generally impaired functioning. Other symptoms include slurred speech, incoordination, unsteady walking, impaired attention and memory, and stupor or possibly coma. Withdrawal symptoms may include trembling, insomnia, nausea, sweating, psychomotor agitation, anxiety, transitory illusions or hallucinations, possibly even grand mal seizures. Barbiturates are used medically as anesthetics and anticonvulsants. They were once used widely to induce sleep, although such prescriptions are now unusual due to public awareness about their dangers. Anxiolytics include diazepam (Valium) and chlordiazepoxide (Librium), calming but addictive.
  • In biological treatments, clients are given substances to block or reduce cravings as when methadone is used to treat heroin addiction. Contingency management: A form of behavioral therapy that involves the principle of rewarding a client for desired behaviors and not providing rewards for undesired behaviors.
  • Halgin6e ppt ch13

    1. 1. Richard P. Halgin Susan Krauss Whitbourne University of Massachusetts at Amherst slides by Travis Langley Henderson State University Abnormal Psychology Clinical Perspectives on Psychological Disorders 5e Clinical Perspectives on Psychological Disorders 6e Richard P. Halgin Susan Krauss Whitbourne slides by Travis Langley Henderson State University Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    2. 2. Chapter 1 <ul><li>Substance-Induced Disorders </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. 13 Chapter
    3. 3. <ul><li>Over one quarter have abused or been dependent on drugs during their lifetime. </li></ul>More than half (51%) of all Americans have used nonprescription or illegal drugs for nonmedical purposes. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    4. 4. Key Terms <ul><li>SUBSTANCE INTOXICATION – Temporary behavioral or psychological changes due to substance accumulation. </li></ul><ul><li>TOLERANCE – After repeated use of a substance, state in which the individual would have to increase amount used to achieve the same effects. </li></ul><ul><li>SUBSTANCE WITHDRAWAL – Set of physical and psychological disturbances experienced when substance is discontinued. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    5. 5. Substance Use Disorders <ul><li>SUBSTANCE ABUSE - Maladaptive substance use that leads to significant impairment or distress. </li></ul><ul><li>SUBSTANCE DEPENDENCE - Addiction. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    6. 6. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    7. 7. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    8. 8. Alcohol Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    9. 9. Patterns of Use and Abuse <ul><li>Approximately 5% of Americans are considered heavy drinkers. </li></ul><ul><li>One in seven has history of alcohol abuse or dependence. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    10. 10. Effects of Alcohol Use <ul><li>Immediate Effects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sedating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Central Nervous System Depressant </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Potentially Fatal in Excess </li></ul></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Alcohol Effects
    11. 11. <ul><li>Immediate Effects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sedating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Central Nervous System Depressant </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Potentially Fatal in Excess </li></ul></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. POTENTIATION compounds these effects. Alcohol Effects
    12. 12. Effects of Alcohol Use <ul><li>Long-Term Effects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tolerance </li></ul></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Heavy drinkers tend to increase intake, thereby increasing likelihood of bodily damage. Alcohol Effects
    13. 13. Effects of Alcohol Use <ul><li>Long-Term Effects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tolerance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dementia </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wernicke’s or Korsakoff’s </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Liver damage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Zinc deficiency </li></ul></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. The list goes on and on . . . . Alcohol Effects
    14. 14. THEORIES OF ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE <ul><li>BIOLOGICAL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Runs in families </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Genetic markers and genetic mapping </li></ul></ul><ul><li>PSYCHOLOGICAL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Expectancy model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Abstinence violation effect </li></ul></ul><ul><li>SOCIOCULTURAL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Family, community, & cultural stressors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Children of alcoholics at greater risk </li></ul></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Theories of Alcohol Dependence
    15. 15. TREATMENT FOR ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. <ul><li>BIOLOGICAL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Medications to control withdrawal symptoms. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Medications as aversive agents. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>PSYCHOLOGICAL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cue exposure method. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relapse prevention therapy. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>12-step program treating alcoholism as disease. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spiritually based, providing social support. </li></ul></ul>Alcohol Treatment
    16. 16. <ul><li>In Alcoholics Anonymous , a drinking binge by an alcoholic who succumbs to temptation is attributed not to moral failing but to biological process. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. <ul><li>Another tenet of AA is that alcoholics are never cured. </li></ul>
    17. 17. TREATMENT FOR ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. <ul><li>Cue exposure method: A behavioral approach to alcohol treatment in which the individual is given a priming dose of alcohol, which initiates the craving for more alcohol; the person is then urged to refuse further alcohol. </li></ul><ul><li>Relapse prevention therapy: A treatment method based on the expectancy model, in which individuals are encouraged not to view lapses from abstinence as signs of certain failure. </li></ul>Alcohol Treatment
    18. 18. Substances Other Than Alcohol Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    19. 19. Stimulants <ul><li>Amphetamines & Methamphetatmines </li></ul><ul><li>Cocaine </li></ul><ul><li>Caffeine </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Stimulant
    20. 21. Cannabis <ul><li>Marijuana </li></ul><ul><li>THC </li></ul><ul><li>Hashish </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Cannabis
    21. 22. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    22. 23. Hallucinogens <ul><li>LSD </li></ul><ul><li>Psilocybin </li></ul><ul><li>PCP </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Hallucinogens
    23. 24. Opioids <ul><li>Natural Opioids: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Opium </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Morphine </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heroin </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Synthetic Opioids </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Methadone </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Codeine </li></ul></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Opioids
    24. 25. Sedatives, Hypnotics, and Anxiolytics <ul><li>SEDATIVES have calming effects on the central nervous system. </li></ul><ul><li>HYPNOTICS have sleep-inducing qualities. </li></ul><ul><li>ANXIOLYTICS are antianxiety medications. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Sedatives, Hypnotics, & Anxiolytics
    25. 27. TREATMENT <ul><li>BIOLOGICAL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Substances to block or reduce craving. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>BEHAVIORAL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contingency management. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>COGNITIVE </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help modify thoughts, expectancies, behaviors concerning drugs. </li></ul></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Treatment
    26. 28. <ul><li>For more information on material covered in this chapter, visit our Web site: </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. http:/ www.mhhe.com/halgin6e

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