Trinity River BasinManagement andTRIMS Mapping ToolBlake AlldredgeExtension AssociateTexas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
Trinity Key Points– Connects D/FW toHouston– Supplies water to~40% of Texaspopulation– 8 million people inthe basin– 512 m...
The Challenges• Rapidly increasingpopulation• Poor waterquality• Habitat loss• Declining wildlifepopulations• Reducedrecre...
Water Quality• 2010 Water QualityInventory and CWA 303(d) List– 37 segments “impaired”– 67 segments of concern– 4 segments...
MissionImprove the quality of life, economic sustainabilityand ecological integrity of areas associated with theTrinity Ri...
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
TRIMS Features
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TRIMS Features

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Presentation showing the features and functions of the Trinity River Information Management System online mapping tool at trims.tamu.edu

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  • The Trinity has several other challenges associated with it. Increasing Population within the basin has led to greater volumes of wastewater and stormwater and has resulted in poor water quality, raising water treatment costs and reducing recreational opportunities. Also, habitat has been lost throughout the basin as native grasslands, bottomland hardwood forests and wetlands have been converted to other uses. This in turn has led to declining grassland bird populations, such as bobwhite quail, which depends on native bunchgrasses and forbs for food and shelter.
  • Going further into water quality issues, the Clean Water Act requires monitoring of streams to ensure water quality standards are being met for their “designated use”, such as drinking water, fish and aquatic life, contact/non-contact recreation, etc. The 303(d) list specifies stream segments that do not meet requirements for their designated use, also called “impaired” due to high levels of pollutant. In the 2010 draft report, 37 segments evaluated were impaired, 67 were of concern because they were close to that threshold, while 4 segments were delisted and 7 were added to the list. Of the 37 segments impaired, 27 were due to high bacteria levels that can come from various sources, such as wastewater effluent, wildlife, livestock, and failing septic systems.
  • Trinity Waters is a landowner organization dedicated to the land and people of the Trinity basin. (READ MISSION STATEMENT) They seek to accomplish this mission by restoring wildlife habitat that will produce greater economic and recreational opportunities from abundant wildlife populations, enhance livestock production with better management, and enable natural land functions to improve water quality.
  • After launching TRIMS, you will see the counties that contain the Trinity River basin outlined. At the top right, you will see a search bar that will help you locate features such as cities, creeks, lakes, etc. Next to the search bar is longitude and latitude. Below that you will see three viewing options: Street, Topo, Aerial. On the left side is a scale, zoom in/out and navigation buttons.
  • When you click on the “Layers” button, a drop down menu will appear showing all data layers. To see these data layers on the map, click the corresponding box next to it. If you are unable to click the box, you will need to zoom in or out to enable the data layer. Shown first is the “Water” layers. You can see locations for stream gauges, water diversions and impaired water bodies. “Hydrology” will also show you drainage courses on the land, which could help when building stock tanks. Click the Legend button at the top to show the Legend Bar on the bottom left.
  • Next is the “Wildlife” layer that shows locations of management areas, associations, and refuges. Zoom in close to see the name of the feature.
  • The “Recreation” layer shows where state and national parks, forests, and grasslands are located. Click the “Identify” button at the top and click the feature to find out name.
  • Under “Ecological” layer click “Soils” to see general soil type information. You can then Google that soil type to find out more info about it.
  • Under “Ecological” click “Landcover” to see what land use/land cover is currently present. Refer to the legend for corresponding colors to land covers.
  • Under “Middle Trinity Conservation Planning” click “Bottomland Hardwoods” to view areas that currently have bottomland hardwood forest (blue) and areas that could potentially be restored to bottomland hardwood based on soil, elevation, and hydrology data (yellow).
  • Still under “Middle Trinity Conservation Planning,” click “Upland Restoration Classes” to view the current land cover on upland areas. This layer is useful when considering restoring native grasslands. Ease of restoration is shown with Grassland/Pasture as most feasible, followed by cropland, shrubland, and forest as least feasible.
  • You can change the transparency of these data layers to see the land under the data layer by moving the toggle bar next to “TRIMS” at the top of the Layers drop down menu.
  • Click the “Topo” button at the top right to view the contour map and see elevations.
  • Click the “Measure” button (looks like ruler) at the top center to measure fence lengths, roads, etc.
  • In the “Measure” box, click the polygon button to measure acreage. Simply click along the perimeter of field or water body to obtain info.
  • Click on the “Drawing” button (looks like pencil) at the top to draw a point, line, or polygon. Multiple objects can be drawn at the same time and in different colors, and clicking the “Clear Graphics” button at the bottom will erase all objects. Can be used for planning new fences, watering points, wildlife feeders/blinds, etc.
  • Click the “Print” button at the top and you can print the screen out or export as a pdf or other format. You can also copy and email the web address link to share with others.
  • TRIMS Features

    1. 1. Trinity River BasinManagement andTRIMS Mapping ToolBlake AlldredgeExtension AssociateTexas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
    2. 2. Trinity Key Points– Connects D/FW toHouston– Supplies water to~40% of Texaspopulation– 8 million people inthe basin– 512 miles long– 1,983 miles oftributaries– 18,000 squaremiles (7% of Texas)
    3. 3. The Challenges• Rapidly increasingpopulation• Poor waterquality• Habitat loss• Declining wildlifepopulations• Reducedrecreationalopportunities
    4. 4. Water Quality• 2010 Water QualityInventory and CWA 303(d) List– 37 segments “impaired”– 67 segments of concern– 4 segments delistedfrom 303(d)– 7 segments added– 27 of 37 impaired segmentsdue to bacteria
    5. 5. MissionImprove the quality of life, economic sustainabilityand ecological integrity of areas associated with theTrinity River Basin through a coalition of localcommunities, NGOs and stewards of private andpublic lands.

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