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spoonerisms spoonerisms are words of phrases in which letters or syllables get swapped. this often happens accidentally in...
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
Spoonerism
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Spoonerism

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Spoonerism

  1. 1. spoonerisms spoonerisms are words of phrases in which letters or syllables get swapped. this often happens accidentally in slips of the tongue (or tips of the slung as spoonerisms are often affectionately called!): come and wook out of the lindow is an example. ''since spoonerisms are phonetic transpositions, it is not so much the letters which are swapped as the sounds themselves. transposing initial consonants in the speed of light gives the leed of spight which is clearly meaningless when written, but phonetically it becomes the lead of spite.'' ''it is not restricted simply to the transposition of individual sounds; whole words or large parts of words may be swapped: to gap the bridge and manahuman soup (to bridge the gap, superhuman man). and sounds within a word may be transposed to form a spoonerism too, as in crinimal and cerely (criminal, celery). it is not uncommon for spoonerisms of this type to be created unintentionally.'' ''generally spoonerisms which are produced accidentally are transpositions between words that resemble one another phonetically, such as cuss and kiddle and slow and sneet (kiss and cuddle, snow and sleet)'' ''the name spoonerism comes from the reverend william archibald spooner who is reputed to have been particularly prone to making this type of verbal slip. spooner, who also was an albino and a sufferer of poor eye-sight, was born july 22, 1844 (d. 1930). photos of him are scarce, but the national portrait gallery in london has the one reproduced here...'' ''english is a fertile soil for spoonerism, as author and lecturer richard lederer points out, because our language has more than three times as many words as any other -- 616,500 and growing at 450 a year. consequently, there's a greater chance that any accidental transposition of letters or syllables will produce rhyming substitutes that still make sense -- sort of. ''''spooner,'''' says lederer, ''''gave us tinglish errors and english terrors at the same time.'''''' ''he seems also to have been somewhat to an absent-minded professor. he once invited a faculty member to tea ''''to welcome our new archaeology fellow.'''' ''''but, sir,'''' the man replied, ''''i am our new archaeology fellow.'''' ''''never mind,'''' spooner said . ''''come all the same,'''' after a sunday service, he turned back to the pulpit and informed his student audience: ''''in the sermon i have just preached, whenever i said aristotle, i meant st.paul,'''''' ''thanks to reverend spooner's style-setting somersaults, our own little tips of the slung will not be looked upon as the embarrassing babblings of a nitwit, but rather the whimsical lapses of a nimble brain. so let us applaus that gentle man who lent his tame to the nerm. may sod rest his goal'' no......can you figure these ones out? know your blows lack of pies bowel fest pit nicking wave the sails have fun

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