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connections,  for commonalities and, 
while doing so,  to suspend assumptions
about persons w...
Etiquette

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A Presentation by Trinayani

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Creating Awareness about D...
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A Little about Disability Etiquette

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Just as we learn proper etiquette when we are children, it is never too late to learn something new such as the basic dos and don'ts when interacting with Persons with different Disabilities.
To be more inclusive as a person, learn about Disability Etiquette.

Published in: Education
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A Little about Disability Etiquette

  1. 1. @@fr: it@ [Ierrncorw [@err§@rms Irrrfiitlh oflfisalbfiflfififies (IEDW/ ®sI).
  2. 2. Unless you have known a number of persons with varying types of disabilities, you may never have had reason to think about the key points that make relationships with persons with disabilities easier and more relaxed.
  3. 3. We urge people to listen for connections, for commonalities and, while doing so, to suspend assumptions about persons with disabilities. cerebrati D3 ALL OF US
  4. 4. Etiquette ° Just as there are basic rules of etiquette (customary code of polite behavior) when interacting in society, there are rules which one could keep in mind when interacting with People with Disabilities. ° The good news is, just as general etiquette is learned through teaching, DISABILITY ETIQUETTE, TOO, CAN BE LEARNT.
  5. 5. With the intent to create a welcoming and relaxed environment for everyone, there are some basic ground rules we could all keep in mind. Read on. ..
  6. 6. Do not make assumptions about the existence or absence of disabilities. Not all disabilities are visible. When planning an event, make sure that it is pe_o - Ask before you help. If someone has a disability, do not assume that he needs help. Ask to see if help is really needed and how to give it. Never tease or laugh at a person with disability_. People with disabilities are individuals with families, jobs, hobbies, likes and dislikes, problems and joys.
  7. 7. Dfisalofiflfity Etfiqoette towards Persons wfith flteatfin Dfisabfiflfity <- - I>. ‘ 2- I . / 9 I I . M 1 / , ’ IF I’ ‘III E , I J; only FOSSIB b ‘If ’ *4. ' I -V I I-’I ‘VF’; . , ‘ ‘I’ ‘I , >o‘q»'I ) I. - 14.1 . . ‘s , * v . , I »"~: I"3-"I‘“~ ’. " 3;? ’ ‘:1, . .e-' up“ I— 4/‘W‘ -— . $.33 ’ R _ ”‘ / " ‘ wclfilhu Id‘, /fit r - 6‘ o« » l' (W ‘ 1" I _.
  8. 8. Face the person you are talking to. Speak clearly and slowly. Do not begin a conversation with a hearing impaired person until he or she has noticed you and is prepared for it. Do not pretend to understand if you do not. Repeat what you understand and ask again. Shouting to a person who is deaf does not help. Feel free to use written notes. If the person uses sign language, remember to look at him or her when speaking, regardless of whether or not an interpreter is present.
  9. 9. Dfisabfiflfity Etfiojuette towards Persons no are W/ neeflenafirs users ~ ea. .- . .."1 ‘fly I
  10. 10. Do not assume that a person on a wheelchair has an intellectual disability too. Speak directly to the person and not to an attendant who may be with him or her. Do not push, lean on or hold on to a person's wheelchair unless the person asks you to. Try to put yourself at eyelevel when talking with someone in a wheelchair so that he or she will not get a stiff neck from looking up for a prolonged pefiod. Avoid terms like “wheel-chair bound”, “confined to a wheelchair”, “cripple”. Instead use the term “wheelchair user”.
  11. 11. When arranging to meet with a person who uses a wheelchair, always give the person prior notice so that time is allowed for arrangement for transportation. Rearrange furniture or objects to accommodate a wheelchair before the person arrives. When assisting a wheelchair user, make sure that you release the breaks of the wheelchair before pushing it and while going up or down steps, always tilt the wheelchair back. When assisting a wheelchair user down an incline, grasp the push handles tightly so that the chair does not go too fast.
  12. 12. Dfisahillity Eticqjuette towards Persons who are Hfind or have tow ‘l i . I‘ IV . /) J ' ‘ *4. ' “tr. ‘Y M! s_. ._. ..r§ I ? «II I ‘I I F "1 L»! ‘ —"' ‘ *7’
  13. 13. - It is important to remember that people who are blind primarily experience the world through hearing and touch. Therefore, use verbal cues when speaking to a person with a visual impairment. ° When talking to a blind person, always introduce yourself and the people with you. When offering a handshake, say something like ‘‘shall we shake hands? ” - When offering assistance, ask the person directly what you need to do. As a rule, allow the person to take your arm. You should guide rather than propel the person. Advise on steps or other obstacles as they OCCUR
  14. 14. - When welcoming a blind person to a room they do not know, give a brief description of the room layout. - If you serve food to a person who is blind, let that person know where everything is on the plate according to a clock orientation.
  15. 15. Disahiiity Etiojuette towards Persons who haye Speech and tanuage t>)isorder; _ V
  16. 16. Be prepared for various devices or techniques used to enhance or augment speech. Do not be afraid to communicate with someone who uses an alphabet board or takes the help of computer synthesized speech. Pay attention, be patient and wait for the person to complete a word or thought. Do not finish it for the person. Don't pretend that you have understood. Ask the person to repeat what is said. In case of severe speech difficulties, you may consider asking questions that require short answers or a nod or shake of the head.
  17. 17. Disahiflity Etiduette towards Persons who have an inteiiectuai Pisahiiity 1 I ‘ »/ V _ «' Childhood ip ““—"i"° D"“%"““' ‘-1 ' " Diiantexzaxixe ? ""' 3'» ~= ' ' I , It [Duo dz liW(. ‘(’II0l$ emvenv enews
  18. 18. Do not make assumptions about what the person can or cannot do. Do not be condescending. Be polite and patient. Do not treat the person like a child. Talk with the person even though he or she may not be verbal enough to respond. Speak in a normal tone of voice and use simple words and short sentences. Give one piece of information at a time and repeat if needed. Be generous, but appropriate with compliments when the person has accomplished a task or taken initiative.
  19. 19. HMHGST HHIt? IIHLP®Li: ’HHAHixHHHLt THIiI. A1H root eiuougiif we [fiI1J[lJJ§{§EJ_l}1“I}1lII; ;II”“I Goethe ‘
  20. 20. A Presentation by Trinayani - A A ‘ VI — v ' I I I . I I I . ‘ I . I I - 1‘ _ 1 . , - I l Creating Awareness about Disability www. trinayani. org , .:v; ,. I: I . I I _ r *fI ' I . . I . ._, :2-.3.’-1°le§v I'.1‘h£)'fJ! h=§§: »=. .

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