Unit 4 AOS 2
Recovery
Monitoring training and recovery
responses
Overtraining
Returning an athlete to a state of
performance readiness both mentally and
physically
After a training session, fatigue ...
States that in order for an athlete to gain
maximum performance benefits, an athlete
must recover adequately from one tra...
Mind Map: What do you do to recover from
a training session or match?
 Assists in preventing
DOMS
 Recommended to use
PNF and Static
Stretching
 Stretches should be
undertaken while the
mus...
 Drink fluids and eat
food with CHOs within
20 minutes of
competing exercise
 You MUST replace the
fluid you lose during...
 Can come in various
forms
 Use depends on when
you need them
 Used for different
reasons
 Movement through
water
 Non-weight bearing
(takes the stress off
the joints)
 Hot/cold baths –
anecdotal evidence
• Ph...
This technique may involve alternating hot
and cold showers etc.
Recent research indicates that contrast
therapy may be a...
 To explain why contrast therapy appears to work so well
is that the changes between vasodilation (heat) and
vasoconstric...
 The use of ice packs
and cold water during
recovery from sports
injuries is known as
cryotherapy.
 Ice aims to reduce t...
 Ice baths involve the
complete immersion of
an athlete’s body, or
body part.
 Often used for athletes
who participate i...
 The rationale behind
ice-baths is that
immersion in very cold
water causes
vasoconstriction in the
body part and assists...
 Can help with physical
and mental recovery
 Relaxes the muscles
 Assist the speed-up of
o2 delivery to the
working mus...
 Thermal bathing in a
spa or mineral spring
increases hydrostatic
pressure on the
body, thereby
increasing blood
circulat...
 Compression applied
to injured body parts
via bandages and
taping has long been
used by athletes to
aid recovery after
i...
POSSIBLE BENEFITS
WHILE PARTICIPATING RECOVERY BENEFITS
 improved sporting
performance
 clearance of metabolic by-
produ...
 Form of relaxation and
stress release
 Very effective method of
stimulating blood flow to
areas of the body that have
b...
 Involves the
administration of 100
per cent pure oxygen
under increased
atmospheric pressure
via the use of a
hyperbaric...
 The athlete breathes in pure oxygen and this
significantly increases the oxygen
concentration levels of arterial blood.
...
 Lack of Sleep can lead to
reduced:
• Reaction times
• Agility
• Speed
• Visual processing
• Concentration
 Both quantit...
The following strategies
could be employed to
ensure a quality sleeping
routine
 a conducive sleeping
environment (comfor...
Physiological recovery strategies
Physiological recovery strategies
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Physiological recovery strategies

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Physiological recovery strategies

  1. 1. Unit 4 AOS 2
  2. 2. Recovery Monitoring training and recovery responses Overtraining
  3. 3. Returning an athlete to a state of performance readiness both mentally and physically After a training session, fatigue is likely to occur. To ensure you gain the benefits of that session, an appropriate recovery period is needed The type and intensity of training will depend on the recovery strategies used
  4. 4. States that in order for an athlete to gain maximum performance benefits, an athlete must recover adequately from one training stimulus before the next stimulus is introduced. Appropriate recovery periods should be planned into the training program
  5. 5. Mind Map: What do you do to recover from a training session or match?
  6. 6.  Assists in preventing DOMS  Recommended to use PNF and Static Stretching  Stretches should be undertaken while the muscles are still warm  Stretching the following day is also advisable
  7. 7.  Drink fluids and eat food with CHOs within 20 minutes of competing exercise  You MUST replace the fluid you lose during exercise. 1L of water for every KG of body weight you lost.  Complete hydration is critical for optimum recovery
  8. 8.  Can come in various forms  Use depends on when you need them  Used for different reasons
  9. 9.  Movement through water  Non-weight bearing (takes the stress off the joints)  Hot/cold baths – anecdotal evidence • Physiology behind this technique?
  10. 10. This technique may involve alternating hot and cold showers etc. Recent research indicates that contrast therapy may be an excellent way of reducing metabolic fatigue, enhancing arousal and relaxing muscles following training or competition. Alternate hot- and cold-water immersion appears to facilitate neuromuscular activity.
  11. 11.  To explain why contrast therapy appears to work so well is that the changes between vasodilation (heat) and vasoconstriction (cold) cause a ‘pumping’ or ‘shunting’ action in the muscles, which helps to speed up waste removal.
  12. 12.  The use of ice packs and cold water during recovery from sports injuries is known as cryotherapy.  Ice aims to reduce the blood flow to the joint or tissue area, thereby reducing the amount of swelling.
  13. 13.  Ice baths involve the complete immersion of an athlete’s body, or body part.  Often used for athletes who participate in high- impact sports (netball/long-distance running) or high-contact sports (AFL, rugby union/league)
  14. 14.  The rationale behind ice-baths is that immersion in very cold water causes vasoconstriction in the body part and assists in the dissipation of blood and waste (LA H+ etc) from any damaged areas.  It can help reduce the swelling from any soft- tissue damage.  It also thought to decrease DOMS (delayed onset of muscle soreness)  Ice-vests are becoming more frequently used to help lower core-body temperature.
  15. 15.  Can help with physical and mental recovery  Relaxes the muscles  Assist the speed-up of o2 delivery to the working muscles  Assists in the removal of waste products
  16. 16.  Thermal bathing in a spa or mineral spring increases hydrostatic pressure on the body, thereby increasing blood circulation and cell oxygenation. The increase in blood flow also helps dissipate waste products form the muscle cells  Bathing in thermal water increases body metabolism, including stimulating the process of digestion. This is important given the need to replenish fuel stores, especially glycogen, as soon as possible.
  17. 17.  Compression applied to injured body parts via bandages and taping has long been used by athletes to aid recovery after injury. It is an integral part of the immediate treatment of injuries to reduce bleeding and swelling  It is now common to see many sports and athletes using compression garments as a method to improve training performance and assist recovery between sessions
  18. 18. POSSIBLE BENEFITS WHILE PARTICIPATING RECOVERY BENEFITS  improved sporting performance  clearance of metabolic by- products  assistance of recovery from high-intensity exercise.  increasing blood flow  increasing venous return  decreasing blood-lactate levels and enhancing removal  reducing blood pooling  reducing swelling  enhancing proprioception  decreasing athletes  perception of muscle soreness (DOMS)  enhancing warm-up via increasing skin temperature.
  19. 19.  Form of relaxation and stress release  Very effective method of stimulating blood flow to areas of the body that have been stressed during exercise or training.  Post-exercise massage, performed 1–2 hours after training or competition, can relieve swelling caused by micro-trauma within muscle fibres. It can also:  help with the removal of lactic acid and other metabolic by-products.  It reduces muscle stiffness, crampingand soreness,  helps speed up the recovery process.
  20. 20.  Involves the administration of 100 per cent pure oxygen under increased atmospheric pressure via the use of a hyperbaric chamber.  Steve Johnson (Geelong)
  21. 21.  The athlete breathes in pure oxygen and this significantly increases the oxygen concentration levels of arterial blood.  The increase in blood-oxygen levels produces a subsequent increase in the oxygen diffusion gradient between the blood and muscle cells.  Supposedly, the more oxygen that can be delivered to fatigued muscle cells, the more rapid the recovery process.
  22. 22.  Lack of Sleep can lead to reduced: • Reaction times • Agility • Speed • Visual processing • Concentration  Both quantity and quality of sleep are very important.  Athletes are encouraged to view their sleeping habits in the same way they would their training habits.  Establishing a pre-sleep routine is very important.  Sports psychologists agree thatsleep hygiene is essential for athletes to benefit from a good nights sleep
  23. 23. The following strategies could be employed to ensure a quality sleeping routine  a conducive sleeping environment (comfortable bed, well-ventilated room)  switching off from the days activities  slowing down the functioning of the brain  going to bed when you are tired.

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