Muscle fibre types and contractions

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Muscle fibre types and contractions

  1. 1. + Muscle Fibre Types And muscular contractions
  2. 2. + Key Concepts  Muscles consist of slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibres. These fibres are suited to certain types of physical activity and assist with an athlete’s capacity to create forceful or sustained muscle contractions.  Muscle contractions can be isotonic (concentric and eccentric) and isometric
  3. 3. + Muscle fibre types  There are two basic types of muscle fibres we have in the body  Fast twitch (2 types) and slow twitch  Most people would have about a 50:50 split of the two different types  Each fibre is better suited to a different type of activity (based on its intensity)
  4. 4. + Slow Twitch (Type 1 fibre)  Red in colour  Contract slowly over a longer period of time  Best suited to aerobic and endurance type activities  Exert less force and can contract repeatedly
  5. 5. + Fast Twitch (Type 2a)  Very similar characteristics to Slow Twitch fibres  Have the ability to contract very forcefully over a longer period of time
  6. 6. + Fast Twitch (Type 2b)  While in colour  Contract rapidly over a shorter period of time  Best suited to anaerobic and high intensity activities  Exert great force in bursts of power and speed
  7. 7. + Athletes and their fibre types
  8. 8. + Types of muscle contractions
  9. 9. + Overview  There are three types of muscles contractions classified by the movement they cause  Isotonic  Isometric
  10. 10. + Isotonic  The most common type of contraction  Occurs when there is a change in muscle length as tension is developed  Muscle is shortening = isotonic concentric  Muscle is lengthening = isotonic eccentric
  11. 11. + Isometric  This type of contractions is characterised by the muscle contracting without causing movement.  Example: Holding your body in a squatting position  It is quite difficult to maintain this contraction for a long period of time

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