Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Ad fraud Awareness-2019 survey report

109 views

Published on

In November we partnered with independent research firm Fuse Insights to conduct a survey measuring the level of awareness digital marketers have about ad fraud.

Published in: Marketing
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Ad fraud Awareness-2019 survey report

  1. 1. Ad Fraud Awareness How Much Do Digital Marketers Really Know About Ad Fraud? A Research Study Created by Fuse Insights Sponsored by:
  2. 2. My name is Matt Gallant, I’m CEO of tribeOS and I’ve been a digital marketer for over twenty years. I made my first online sale in 1998, and I still fondly remember when advertisers and publishers were able to make a proper return on ad spend running digital campaigns. But sadly, the digital marketing landscape is very different today than it was back then, and that’s because because it’s become overrun by scammers and spammers. Industry giants like Newsweek have been forced to admit to buying fake traffic. Advertisers are losing a whopping $51 Million every single day. And ad fraud has now officially become the second most profitable organized crime in the world, second only to drug trafficking. It’s gotten so bad that Procter & Gamble, the largest brand advertiser in the world, cut their digital ad spend by $200 Million a year and actually increased their reach by 10%. How is that possible? Simple, they were no longer throwing money away on bots and click farms. And yet, most people don’t know what ad fraud is and know even less about how it works to steal advertising budgets. That’s why my team and I decided to make an investment in this research study. Rather than looking at the spammers and scammers, at digging into how ad fraud is being conducted and how much money is being stolen, we wanted to focus directly on the people and teams who are running digital ad campaigns. We believed that awareness about ad fraud remained strikingly low and we wanted to have real data to back it up. Knowledge is power, understanding where the gaps in our own knowledge are is the first step toward change. We are committed to remaining at the bleeding edge of the fight against ad fraud. Despite what you may believe, ad fraud affects every person, every team, and every company that advertises online. I hope that armed with this data, you are able to forge a clear path toward protecting yourself and your ad spend. We are a movement, and we are growing. Welcome to the tribe. Matt Gallant CEO of tribeOS
  3. 3. Most Marketers are Unfamiliar with Ad Fraud How Big of a Problem do Marketers Think Ad Fraud Is? Key Takeaways & How to Protect Yourself Appendix Who Participated in this Survey? Table of Contents 5 12 21 26
  4. 4. Godzilla image Vecteezy.com $ 1⁄3Experienced marketers are not familiar with ad fraud or have never heard of it Most respondents see ad fraud as the BIGGEST PROBLEM (or one of the biggest) facing the industry Most marketers have a limited understanding of what ad fraud is and how it works Only 13% of those respondents have a working knowledge of ad fraud and how it works 1⁄33⁄5 ¯_(ツ)_/¯ 55% have no idea how much is lost globally each year to ad frauddo not see ad fraud as affecting them 33% think they know it 77% have heard of ad fraud 94% do not identify as experts Only 11% of respondents have a working knowledge of ad fraud
  5. 5. Most Marketers are Unfamiliar with Ad Fraud
  6. 6. Ignorance is bliss? 4⁄5see ad fraud as a consumer problem not a problem for digital marketing 1⁄3experienced marketers are not familiar with ad fraud or have never heard of it of marketers surveyed have never heard of ad fraud 77% have heard of ad fraud 64% don’t really know what ad fraud is 22% 85% of those respondents could not give an accurate, working description of ad fraud and how it works Even though 49% of those respondents have 10+ years experience in digital advertising
  7. 7. MOST MARKETERS ARE UNFAMILIAR WITH AD FRAUD Only 11% of marketers surveyed could give an accurate definition of ad fraud Everyone who said they’d heard of ad fraud was asked in their own words to describe it. We then read their responses and summarised them – as shown in this chart. 77% of marketers said they’d heard of ad fraud. But when asked, only 15%* of them were able to describe ad fraud in terms the digital marketing industry would accept. These terms include: fake data, being charged for ads that aren’t shown, and fake interactions, etc. 3% said they really don’t know what ad fraud is. 8 out of 10 provided an incorrect description of what ad fraud is focusing on ads that defraud consumers, pretend to be from legitimate brands and so on. Only 18% of all respondents who claimed to be ‘expert’ or ‘experienced’ in digital marketing gave a correct description of ad fraud. *Marketers were asked to write in their own words what ad fraud is and how it works. In your own words, how would you describe online ad fraud and what it is? Fake/ bot traffic/ interactions Fake data Charging for ads that aren't shown Fake/copied ads; ads pretending to be from a specific brand/org False claims in ads Phishing/ ads to steal (consumer) data Ads defrauding consumers "Fraud", fake/ false ads Ads that lead to fraudulent sites Other Don't know/ unsure Base: all respondents who have heard of online ad fraud (210) Correct 3% 20% 2% 1% 6% 15% 18% 25% 2% 6% 10%
  8. 8. MOST MARKETERS ARE UNFAMILIAR WITH AD FRAUD Only 1 in 3 experienced marketers think they know digital advertising well 70% of survey respondents are senior management or higher. Respondents have an average of 11 years experience working in marketing 100% act as marketing ‘decision makers,’ meaning that they act as the resident marketing expert and subject matter expert for their organization. The majority of respondents are solely responsible for marketing within their organization. Despite having over a decade’s experience in marketing, very few see themselves as experts. 18% of people who said they’ve worked in marketing for 10+ years say they have no, or minimal, knowledge of digital advertising. And which of these answers best describes your knowledge and experience of digital advertising? 7% 20% 44% 24% 6% Expert: Experienced: Some exposure Minimal None Base: all respondents (274)
  9. 9. MOST MARKETERS ARE UNFAMILIAR WITH AD FRAUD While 3/4 have heard of ad fraud, only 1/3 (think they) know what it is 64% of our respondents said they’re not familiar with ad fraud – including half (49%) of those who have 10+ years of digital marketing under their belt. 1 in 3 (30%) of those who said they’re ‘experienced’ or ‘expert’ in digital advertising also said they’re not familiar with or haven’t even heard of ad fraud. Only 58% of people who say they’re familiar with ad fraud are actually experienced in digital marketing – and as we’ll see, what they understand of ad fraud is perhaps not what should be worrying them as marketers. How familiar, if at all, are you with online ad fraud? 1% 22% 41% 26% 9% Very familiar Quite familiar Not very familiar Not at all Don't know Base: all respondents (274)
  10. 10. MOST MARKETERS ARE UNFAMILIAR WITH AD FRAUD They don’t know what they are or how they work, but marketers have heard of the tactics fraudsters use steal ad spend All those respondents who claimed to have heard of ad fraud were then asked about specific ad fraud mechanisms, as charted here. When prompted, 2/3 of marketers claim to have at least heard of bot traffic and click farms. As detailed above, they probably don’t know much about how they work or, more importantly, what it means for their campaigns, but it’s still promising. And as a proportion of all the marketers we surveyed, that’s half who have heard of bot traffic and click farms. Similarly, about half of marketers surveyed have heard of buying traffic; fewer than half know about domain spoofing, hidden/ invisible ads, and so on. Which of these different types of ad fraud (if any) do you know about? 43% 49% 57% 62% 66% Bot traffic, click farms Buying traffic Domain spoofing pop-unders, hidden or invisible ads Cookie stuffing Base: all respondents who have heard of online ad fraud/ all respondents (210/ 274)
  11. 11. MOST MARKETERS ARE UNFAMILIAR WITH AD FRAUD Despite a lack of awareness about ad fraud, marketers understand that it is rampant All respondents who know anything about digital marketing or have heard of ad fraud (91% of our 274 marketers) were asked about the presence of ad fraud in particular digital channels. The good news is that, regardless of how well they understand what ad fraud is, they realise it’s fairly rampant. 4 out of 5 people who know anything about digital marketing said that they think there’s ad fraud on social ads. Only 3% of this group think that there definitely isn’t ad fraud in social channels. And it’s a similar story with other online ad solutions – the majority of respondents asked think that they’re prone to at least some ad fraud. But more than that, only a tiny minority think there’s no ad fraud in these formats. Also worth noting is that 1 in 5 admit that they really don’t know, for any channel, whether there’s fraud or not. In general, how much ad fraud do you think there is with each type of ad below? A Lot of fraud Base: All respondents who have some experience with digital marketing or heard of online ad fraud (249) Social ads (on Facebook, Twitter etc) Online display ads (banners, etc) Ads in mobile apps Search ads (Google AdWords) Online video ads (pre-roll, in-banner video etc) Some ad fraud Don’t knowNone 21% 5% 51% 23% 21% 6% 48% 25% 22% 2% 46% 30% 22% 4% 43% 31% 18% 3% 38% 42%
  12. 12. How Big of a Problem do Marketers Think Ad Fraud Is?
  13. 13. While marketers may have heard of ad fraud, the majority are unable to give an adequate description of what it is and how it works. This becomes even more striking when marketers are asked deeper questions about who is hurt by ad fraud and who should be responsible for putting an end to it. I haven’t been affected ...probably “It’s a big problem... but it’s not my problem.” The misunderstanding of what ad fraud is and who it affects influences the marketers’ whole perception of how relevant ad fraud is to their own day-to-day marketing efforts. 36% 3⁄5 say their own campaigns haven’t, or probably haven’t been affected say they definitely haven’t been directly affected $ 1⁄3 ¯_(ツ)_/¯ have no idea how much is lost globally each year to ad fraud Most respondents see ad fraud as the BIGGEST PROBLEM (or one of the biggest) facing the industry Only 13% of those respondents have a working knowledge of ad fraud and how it works 55%
  14. 14. HOW BIG OF A PROBLEM DO MARKETERS THINK AD FRAUD IS? Ad fraud is seen as a big problem by most who’ve heard of it – but for many that’s based on misunderstanding what it is Everyone who had heard of ad fraud was asked how big a problem it is for the online ad industry. More than half said it’s one of, if not the, biggest problems facing the online ad industry right now. But that still leaves a third who don’t see it as a huge issue, and 1 in 10 who really aren’t sure. Given the understanding of ad fraud demonstrated previously, though, this doesn’t necessarily indicate that marketers understand it as a big problem for them. In fact, of those marketers saying it’s the, or one of the, biggest problem(s) facing the industry, only 13% described ad fraud in terms we’d use. Given what you know about ad fraud, how serious a problem do you think it is for the online advertising industry as a whole? Please select the one answer you think best describes it Single biggest problem facing online ad industry today One of the biggest problems facing online ad industry A big problem, but there are much bigger concerns facing the industry right now It’s really not a big problem for the online ad industry Don’t know Base: all respondents who have heard of online ad fraud (210) t 9% 5% 31% 46% 9%
  15. 15. HOW BIG OF A PROBLEM DO MARKETERS THINK AD FRAUD IS? Most don’t know how much ad fraud costs the industry; but arguably that’s irrelevant to them Few respondents really understood the financial impact of ad fraud at a global level. (Although there are numerous competing figures in the industry, we’ve worked on the assumption that ad fraud costs $51 Million a day and $19 Billion a year). 1/3 of respondents who have heard of ad fraud said they just have no idea how much is lost to it each year in $; and a similar number don’t know as a proportion of total ad spend either. At a broader level, the answers perhaps also illustrate that many marketers don’t really think about how much is spent on advertising globally – for people whose success is measured in terms of their own specific marketing tactics, does it really matter that much? Which of these is closest to the total amount lost globally to ad fraud every year? …and as a proportion of global ad spend? <$50,000 $50,000 500,000 5,000,000 50,000,000 500,000,000 5,000,000,000 50,000,000,000 >50,000,000,000 Don't know <10% 10-25% 25-50% 50-75% >75% Don’t know Base: all respondents who have heard of online ad fraud (210) *Correct11% 35% 6% 10% 14% 10% 8% 32% 2% 5% 19% 30% 11%
  16. 16. HOW BIG OF A PROBLEM DO MARKETERS THINK AD FRAUD IS? There’s a cognitive gap between “it’s a big problem” and “I might have been affected” This idea that “ad fraud is a big problem, but I don’t think it applies to me” is evident when respondents were asked about their own digital campaigns. 3 out of 5 believe that their own digital campaigns haven’t been subject to ad fraud and only 1 in 5 concede that they may have run into it. 17% at least say they genuinely don’t know. Those who say they have (probably) had issues with ad fraud are disproportionately likely to be in the marketing industry; they’re also more likely to say they’re experienced in digital marketing and familiar with ad fraud. Perhaps more alarmingly, 3/4 of those who said they definitely haven’t had ad fraud work for firms that have run social ads in the last year, about a third have run online video ads, and a little over 1 in 4 have run display ads. Overlay those numbers with the proportion saying social, search and other ads have ad fraud (p17), and you can see quite vividly this idea that “ad fraud is a problem, but doesn’t affect me.” It’s possible this stems from the small budgets people are working with, and an idea that “ad fraud is something that only happens on those big complex campaigns,” or “I’m just placing ads through the Facebook interface, so I’m safe enough.” But the truth is it’s the smaller players who suffer the costs of ad fraud most. Base: all respondents who have had some experience with digital marketing (202) Thinking back to your own work in marketing, have any of the digital campaigns you’ve worked on ever been subject to ad fraud? Yes, definitely Probably, although it’s 100% certain Possibly, although it seems unlikely Definitely not Don’t know 17% 36% 25% 13% 8%
  17. 17. HOW BIG OF A PROBLEM DO MARKETERS THINK AD FRAUD IS? Buying ad space from well known publishers tops the list for solving ad fraud Our respondents have demonstrated that they’re not really aware of why ad fraud is such a problem, and the importance to their own campaigns – and so when 6 out of 10 agree that “only buying from well-known publishers” is a solution to ad fraud, it’s valid to wonder the extent to which they rely upon it. And if they see that as a solution but don’t know much about the mechanics of ad fraud, does it leave them even more open to domain spoofing? Also notable is that only a quarter realise that checking standard campaign data isn’t a solution for ad fraud. There’s clearly a big opportunity here to educate marketers not just that they should be taking these steps, but what they actually mean. Based on what you know of ad fraud, which of these would you say would solve ad fraud? Base: all respondents who have some experience with digital marketing or heard of online ad fraud (249) Definitely solves ad fraud Helps but isn’t the whole answer Don’t know what this is Not a solution 11% 44% 38% 7% 21% 16% 54% 10% 26% 18% 47% 10% 17% 24% 47% 12% 18% 15% 51% 16% 24% 6% 51% 19% 10% 9% 59% 23% Only buying ad space from well-known publishers Using an ad verification vendor (MOAT, DoubleVerify...) Not paying per impression, click or other metric which can be easily faked Checking the standard campaign data (impressions, clicks...) Checking a site’s ads.txt before buying any ad space there Using inclusion/ exclusion lists of sites to include or exclude from your online ad campaign Paying for more expensive ad inventory rather than buying cheaply
  18. 18. HOW BIG OF A PROBLEM DO MARKETERS THINK AD FRAUD IS? 3 out of 5 see the marketer as at least some responsibility for preventing ad fraud; but most think it’s the publishers, networks, agencies who should crack down This question was asked of all marketers who have experience of digital marketing or who have heard of ad fraud. 3 out of 5 feel that the marketer has a role to play in helping prevent ad fraud. Most marketers believe that publishers, networks and ad platforms should take responsibility for preventing ad fraud seems well-placed. But again, this sits somewhat at odds with respondents’ perceptions of their own liability, exposure to and role in preventing ad fraud.Based on your knowledge, who do you think is responsible for preventing ad fraud? 12% 4% 48% 15% 24% 49% 12% Totally responsible Partly responsible Don’t knowNot at all 14% 9% 55% 22% 14% 6% 55% 25% 14% 5% 55% 25% 35% The ad networks (such as Oath, Google AdSense etc) selling the ad space Ad platforms or exchanges where ad space is bought and sold The online publisher/ websites on which the ads appear The advertiser’s media agency that buys the ad space The marketer that’s paying for the ad campaign Base: all respondents who have had some experience with digital marketing or heard of online ad fraud (249)
  19. 19. HOW BIG OF A PROBLEM DO MARKETERS THINK AD FRAUD IS? 3 out of 5 think digital advertising is so complicated that ad fraud is inevitable By the end of the survey, many respondents had a better understanding – or at least stronger opinions – of ad fraud. Perhaps most headline-worthy is that among all our marketer respondents (274), 3 out of 5 feel that ad fraud is an inevitable corollary of the complexity of the digital ad ecosystem. But again, more than half concede that marketers have to take at least some responsibility for where their ads run online. 4 out of 5 believe that publishers are responsible for ensuring all ads are visible and served to people – and only 7% disagreed. How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements? Disagree Agree Neither Agree Nor Disagree Publishers and website owners are responsible for ensuring that all the ads on their sites are visible, and served to people, not bots Digital ad buying is so complex it’s no wonder there’s fraud Ultimately, the marketer paying for the campaign needs to take responsibility for where their ads are shown Really, when it comes to online ads there’s no way of knowing what ads are appearing where, and who’s seeing them Base: all respondents (274) 6% 8% 4% 2% 20% 14% 10% 5% 12% 18% 24% 37% 21% 22% 27% 14% 41% 38% 35% 43%
  20. 20. HOW BIG OF A PROBLEM DO MARKETERS THINK AD FRAUD IS? Ad networks don’t take enough responsibility for their involvement in ad fraud None of the online ad campaigns I’ve worked on have ever had issues with fraud When I’ve run online campaigns, I’ve always been happy with how successful they’ve been When I run online ad campaigns, the ad vendors and solutions I use do enough to protect me from fraud Ad fraud is less of a problem than it used to be Respondents are a little less sure of their own exposure to ad fraud The survey was designed such that respondents had to answer for each statement – so the % saying “neither agree nor disagree” is insightful. For example, we can see that when asked about their own issues with ad fraud, there’s a significant minority of respondents who really aren’t sure. Only 31% said their ad vendors and solutions protect them from fraud – a quarter said they definitely don’t, and 45% essentially don’t know. And when pressed, although 42% said their digital ad campaigns have never suffered from fraud, a quarter think they have, and a third aren’t confident enough to give an answer either way. Thinking more broadly about online and mobile advertising, how much do you agree or disagree with these statements? Disagree Agree Neither Agree Nor Disagree Base: all respondents who have had some experience with digital marketing (202) 23% 6% 8% 8% 28% 18% 20% 15% 3% 7% 8% 20% 10% 24% 31% 22% 3% 5% 23% 37% 45% 33% 35% 22% 47%
  21. 21. Key Takeaways & How to Protect Yourself
  22. 22. KEY TAKEAWAYS & HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF The 4 Key Gaps in Ad Fraud Awareness Our research indicates that there are 4 critical gaps in the general level of awareness that digital marketers have about what ad fraud is and how it works. GAP 1 THE RELEVANCY GAP Our data shows that while respondents are aware of ad fraud on a generic level, or have at least heard of ad fraud in a vague sense, what ad fraud is, how it works, and how it affects them directly as digital marketers remains a bit of a mystery. For instance, more than half of the digital marketers we surveyed said ad fraud is one of, if not the, biggest problems facing the online ad industry. However, that still leaves a third of respondents who don’t recognize that ad fraud is a critical issue and 1 in 10 who really aren’t sure at all. In addition, of those marketers who realize it’s one of the biggest problems facing digital advertisers, only 13% described ad fraud in familiar terms used by those more savvy on the issue. Meaning only a small fraction who understand that ad fraud is a big problem, actually understand what ad fraud is. And perhaps most alarmingly, the vast majority don’t see it as something that they themselves are affected by. GAP 2 AD FRAUD IS A PROBLEM, BUT NOT MY PROBLEM And this is where you see the relevancy gap clearly take hold. Consider these results as confirmation of that fact: 6 out of 10 believe that their own digital campaigns aren’t subject to ad fraud Only 1 in 5 concede that they may been impacted by ad fraud 17% at least say they genuinely don’t know Perhaps more alarming, is that 3/4 of those who said they haven’t experienced ad fraud actually work for digital marketing firms that run social ads! This includes a third that have run online video ads, and a little over 1 in 4 that have run display ads.
  23. 23. KEY TAKEAWAYS & HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF GAP 3 MARKETERS FAIL TO APPRECIATE THE TRUE COSTS OF AD FRAUD Because of disconnects #1 and #2, few respondents fully comprehend the financial impact of ad fraud at a global level. In essence, respondents see a number like $51 Million lost every day to ad fraud as “someone else’s problem” and not theirs. This data point confirms that previous insight: 1/3 of respondents who have heard of ad fraud said they just have no idea how much is lost to it each year in dollars; and a similar number don’t know any figure (such as industry estimates of 30-50%) as a proportion of total ad spend either. GAP 4 WHO’S ULTIMATELY RESPONSIBLE FOR AD FRAUD? Respondents felt social ads were more vulnerable to ad fraud than display ads. So, digital marketers know ad fraud exists but aren’t sure how relevant is to their campaigns. Now, how do they feel about who’s ultimately responsible? Answers to that question carry a two-fold importance: first where the problem lies and second who’s responsible for fixing it. 4 out of 5 believe that publishers are responsible for making all ads visible and served to people – and only 7% disagreed 3 out of 5 agree that “only buying from well-known publishers” is a possible solution. 3 out of 5 feel the marketer should take at least some responsibility for preventing ad fraud; but more say the publishers/ networks/ agencies must prevent it Only a quarter realise that checking standard campaign data is not a solution for ad fraud Looking at this section of the study results reveals a contradiction of sorts: while 3 out of 5 stated the marketer bears some responsibility in preventing ad fraud there is still the apparent disconnect about their own liability, exposure to and role in preventing ad fraud.
  24. 24. KEY TAKEAWAYS & HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF A FINAL TAKEAWAY The complexity of the ad buying process complicates matters By the end of the survey, many respondents had a better understanding – or at least stronger opinions – of ad fraud. In fact, 3 out of 5 feel that ad fraud is an inevitable outcome because of the complexity of the digital ad landscape. And as a reminder, more than half concede that marketers should take some responsibility for where their ads run online. Overall, the insights gained on this research study show more education and awareness are needed across the board for in-house marketers as well ad digital ad firms and marketing consultants as well.
  25. 25. KEY TAKEAWAYS & HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF So what can we, as digital marketers, do to forge a clear path towards protecting ourselves and our ad spend from scammers and, ultimately, end ad fraud once and for all? UNDERSTAND AD FRAUD Above all else, it is quite critical that we, as digital marketers, take the first step in educating ourselves about what ad fraud is, how it works, and how our own campaigns and return on ad spend might be affected. Luckily, there are a number of very dedicated independent researchers committed to investigating, documenting, and publishing the latest developments, stats, and figures about how scammers are stealing campaign dollars. I would urge you to look into the work of Dr. Augustine Fou along with the ad fraud collective Social Puncher where you can learn not only about just how bad ad fraud has become, but also about emerging tactics fraudsters use to steal ad spend. Stay up to late on the latest ad fraud news at websites like sadbottrue.com, The Drum, AdAge, and the IAB. And you can check out our blog at www.tribeos.io/blog where you will find educational articles to help you get a better understanding of what ad fraud really is and how it works. GET INVOLVED IN THE FIGHT TO END AD FRAUD And finally, become a part of our tribe and join the fight to end ad fraud. Sign up to for our waitlist and get early access to tribeOS, the only digital advertising marketplace that makes stopping at fraud and protecting your hard earned ad spend our #1 priority. Together, we can stop ad fraud once and for all.
  26. 26. Appendix
  27. 27. Who Participated in this Survey?
  28. 28. 274American Canadian Survey Sample Overview 274 marketing decision-makers in Canada and the US 70% of survey respondents are senior management or higher 30% of marketers surveyed said they’re expert or experienced in digital advertising, even though all respondents act as the resident marketing expert and decision maker for their organization. Only 32% say they are experienced or experts in digital marketing. 22% of marketing decision makers say they have minimal or no knowledge about digital advertising. Ad fraud is extremely relevant to the people we surveyed for this study. It has a direct affect on their professional performance and the return on ad spend generated by their digital ad campaigns. Respondents have an average of 11 years experience working in marketing The majority of respondents are solely responsible for marketing within their organization and act as the resident marketing expert for their companies 58% Spending on Digital Ads 42% Spending on Offline Ads
  29. 29. APPENDIX • WHO PARTICIPATED IN THIS SURVEY? We surveyed a representative cross-section of the marketing community Marketing decision-makers – that’s both offline and online marketing The majority are marketers in non-marketing organizations. They’re the marketing SME for their business – responsible for its marketing initiatives over the course of the year. Some are from the marketing and publishing sector, and in total 10% of respondents work for an agency, or an ad tech/ad verification firm. But they’re very much in the minority. Most work for small to medium size companies and teams. The marketing budgets they influence are commensurately small and digital ad formats feature heavily in their marketing efforts. 86% spent on marketing in the last year; of that 86%, 2/3 spent less than $50,000 ...and for the majority, at least half of that went on digital formats. Respondents are a diverse group, and a fairly representative cross-section of the marketing community. They may not have huge budgets, but they have to handle marketing for their entire organization – and so ad fraud is a vital consideration for them.
  30. 30. APPENDIX • WHO PARTICIPATED IN THIS SURVEY? In total 274 people completed the survey, 255 (93%) from AskingCanadians’ panels and 19 from external sources. Of those externally sourced respondents, 14 are in the US. The geographic spread of Canadian respondents is shown; among US-based respondents, 38% are in the South, 23% West, 20% Midwest and 19% in the Northeast. Just under half (47%) of respondents are college/ university graduates, and a further 23% have a post-grad qualification. Sample Profile Base: all respondents/ all in Canada (274/ 255) Ontario 48% Prairies 21% BC 17% Atlantic 9% Quebec 4% Northeast 19% South 38% Midwest 20% West 23% 77% Canadian 23% American 7% External 93% Panel
  31. 31. APPENDIX • WHO PARTICIPATED IN THIS SURVEY? Which of these best describes your job title/ level? Half of respondents are C-Level, with 2/3 being senior management level or above. Three quarters (77%) of respondents in Canada work in companies of up to 10 employees, reflecting the extent to which the economy is dominated by small companies; but also that for any given job title - such as “the person responsible for marketing” - that skew of small companies is even more pronounced. Respondents in the US unsurprisingly work for slightly larger companies: 1 in 3 works for a company of 1 to 10 employees, and 22% work in companies of more than 250 people. Respondents are predominantly senior management and work for small firms How many employees does your company have, across all offices and locations? Other 11% Non-management 8% (Consultant, Executive, Associate, etc) Other management 11% (Director, Manager, Team Manager) Senior Management 14% (SVP, VP, Senior Director, etc) C-Suite 56% (incl President, Managing Director, etc) 67% 13% 9% 4% 5% 1-10 11-50 51-250 251-1000 >1000 Base: all respondents (274)
  32. 32. APPENDIX • WHO PARTICIPATED IN THIS SURVEY? About 4/5 are not in marketing organisations Areas in which make or influence decisions as part of your job, including acting a decision maker for clients or other organisations A fifth (57) of respondents work for businesses in marketing, comms, media or publishing. Of those 57, a third work for agencies (ie 7% of our total sample), a fifth for media publishers, and a small number (8 respondents) for ad tech firms or ad networks. Apart from them and a handful of consultants listed under ‘other’, everyone else (ie about 4/5 of respondents) is a marketer in a non-marketing organisation. Everyone who completed the survey is a marketing decision-maker. 6 out of 10 are responsible for both digital and offline plans, with 18% handling just offline marketing. Areas in which make or influence decisions as part of your job, including acting a decision maker for clients or other organisations Offine Marketing 18% Digital Marketing 21% Both 61% Marketing, Communications Retail and Hospitality Real Estate, Finance, Insurance Arts and Entertainment Construction and Skilled Trades Health and Fitness Media, Publishing Education, Health or Social Services Manufacturing Non-profit Organizations Wholesale, Distribution Agriculture Natural Resources, Mining, Oil & Gas Transportation, Shipping, Warehousing Pharmaceuticals, Medicine Gov't, Public Administration, Utilities Others Base: all respondents (274) 19% 1% 1.1% 0.7% 1.5% 1.5% 2% 3% 4% 4% 5% 5% 6% 6% 7% 7% 12% 16%
  33. 33. APPENDIX • WHO PARTICIPATED IN THIS SURVEY? Most have extensive marketing experience but they’ve spent less time with digital marketing Time worked in or been involved in marketing/digital marketing On average respondents to the survey have 11 years’ experience with marketing. 8 out of 10 have spent more than 2 years working in or involved with marketing, half have more than 10 years under their belt, and only a quarter have less than 4 years’ experience. As a group they have a bit less experience with digital – the average is 6 years’ working with digital marketing. And 30% of respondents say they’ve never worked with digital, or have done so for less than a year. Still, that means 7 out of 10 have at least a year’s experience – and of course, 82% are involved in making digital marketing decisions for their organisation. Never <1yr 1-2yrs 2-4yrs 4-6yrs 6-8yrs 8-10 10-15 >15yrs Marketing (in general) Digital Marketing Base: all respondents (274) 9% 8% 12% 9%10% 12% 9% 13% 17% 38% 13% 9% 6%7%8% 7% 12%
  34. 34. APPENDIX • WHO PARTICIPATED IN THIS SURVEY? Spending Habits
  35. 35. APPENDIX • WHO PARTICIPATED IN THIS SURVEY? 2/3 work for organizations running marketing at least every year; most have small budgets 2/3 of respondents work for organisations that undertake marketing at least annually, with only 1 in 10 saying their company never advertises. More specifically, 8 out of 10 said their organisation has spent on marketing in the last 12 months. On average, their organisations spent $110,000 in the last 12 months, although this is skewed by the few organisations spending >$1,000,000. The majority spent less than $50k in the last year; unsurprisingly larger organisations spent, on average, more. NB: the question didn’t specify USD/ CAD, so it’s expected that respondents answered in their own currency. Does your company do any marketing or advertising, whether for itself or on behalf of any clients or other organisations? Amount spent on marketing/ advertising in last 12 months, incl for any clients or other orgs No 11% >1m to 1m to 750k to 500k to 250k <%50,000- $100,000 <%50,000 Nothing Most of the Time 46% Certain Times of Year 21% Rarely 23% Base: all respondents (274) 16% 55% 7% 5% 4% 1% 0% 1%
  36. 36. APPENDIX • WHO PARTICIPATED IN THIS SURVEY? On average, 58% of marketing spend went to digital ads Those whose organisations have invested in marketing in the last year were asked what proportion was spent on digital formats. Virtually all said that at least some of the budget went on digital formats. The average spent on digital was 58% of the marketing budget for the last 12 months. 63% said that half or more had been spent on digital ads. The most popular formats were social and search ads: 72% and 43% respectively of those whose firms spent money on digital in the last year said their efforts included ads on social platforms or search engines. 35% had included display ads, 33% online video and 14% mobile in-app ads. What proportion of this was spent on digital ads? 20% 22% 13% 9% 8% 19% 6% 100%>75%50-75%~50%25-50%<25%None Base: respondents whose organisation has spent on mktg in last year (209)

×